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Emily Carter

Emily A. Carter

Dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science
Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment
Professor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Applied and Computational Mathematics

B.S., Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, 1982
Ph.D., Chemistry, California Institute of Technology, 1987
Postdoctoral Fellow, Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, 1987-1988

Room: C230 Engineering Quad
Phone: 609-258-5391

Webpage: The Carter Group

Honors and Awards

  • Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecturer, American Chemical Society, 2016
  • Member, National Academy of Engineering, 2015
  • 2015-16 Joseph O. Hirschfelder Prize in Theoretical Chemistry, Theoretical Chemistry Institute at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2015
  • 2014 Ira Remsen Award, Maryland Section of the American Chemical Society, Johns Hopkins University, 2014
  • Sigillo D’Oro (Golden Sigillum) Medal, Italian Chemical Society, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy, 2013
  • Docteur Honoris Causa from L’Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland (EPFL), 2012
  • August Wilhelm von Hofmann Lecture Award, German Chemical Society, 2011
  • Member, International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science, 2009
  • Member, National Academy of Sciences, 2008
  • Fellow, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 2008

Concurrent University Appointments

  • Dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science
  • Associated Faculty, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
  • Associated Faculty, Department of Chemistry
  • Associated Faculty, Princeton Institute for Computational Science and Engineering
  • Associated Faculty, Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials
  • Associated Faculty, Princeton Environmental Institute


Research Areas

Research Interests

Emily Carter is a theorist first known for her work combining ab-initio quantum chemistry with dynamics and kinetics, especially as applied to surface chemistry. More recently, she has merged chemistry, solid state physics, materials science, applied mathematics, and mechanical engineering together, with her work on linear scaling, orbital-free density functional methods that afford treatment of thousands of atoms from first principles, her embedding theory that combines quantum chemistry with condensed matter electronic structure calculations, her local and spin-dependent pseudopotential theories, and her reduced scaling configuration interaction quantum mechanics methods. Prof. Carter is now merging these techniques with finite element approaches to undertake multi-length-scale simulations of materials. Some of the scientific questions she is working to answer include understanding how materials fail due to chemical and mechanical effects and how to optimally protect these materials against failure. This work has earned her a number of national and international awards including medals and fellowships of the American Vacuum Society, the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science. After 16 years on the Chemistry and Materials Science faculty at UCLA, she moved to Princeton in September 2004, where she was the Founding Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment from 2010-2016 and a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics from 2004-2016. She currently holds courtesy appointments in Chemistry, Chemical and Biological Engineering, and three interdisciplinary institutes (PICSciE, PRISM, and PEI). In 2011, she was named the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, and in 2016, the Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science.