Gene knockout

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{disease, patient, cell}
{math, number, function}
{game, team, player}
{build, building, house}
{work, book, publish}

A gene knockout (abbreviation: KO) is a genetic technique in which an organism is engineered to carry genes that have been made inoperative (have been "knocked out" of the organism). Also known as knockout organisms or simply knockouts, they are used in learning about a gene that has been sequenced, but which has an unknown or incompletely known function. Researchers draw inferences from the difference between the knockout organism and normal individuals.

The term also refers to the process of creating such an organism, as in "knocking out" a gene. The technique is essentially the opposite of a Gene Knock-in. Knockout is often abbreviated as KO. Knocking out two genes simultaneously in an organism is known as a double knockout (DKO). Similarly the terms triple knockout (TKO) and quadruple knockouts (QKO) are used to describe 3 or 4 knocked out genes, respectively.

Contents

Method

Knockout is accomplished through a combination of techniques, beginning in the test tube with a plasmid, a bacterial artificial chromosome or other DNA construct, and proceeding to cell culture. Individual cells are genetically transformed with the DNA construct. Often the goal is to create a transgenic animal that has the altered gene. If so, embryonic stem cells are genetically transformed and inserted into early embryos. Resulting animals with the genetic change in their germline cells can then often pass the gene knockout to future generations.

To create knockout moss, transfection of protoplasts is the preferred method. Such transformed Physcomitrella-protoplasts directly regenerate into fertile moss plants. Already eight weeks after transfection the plants can be screened for gene targeting via PCR.[1]

The construct is engineered to recombine with the target gene, which is accomplished by incorporating sequences from the gene itself into the construct. Recombination then occurs in the region of that sequence within the gene, resulting in the insertion of a foreign sequence to disrupt the gene. With its sequence interrupted, the altered gene in most cases will be translated into a nonfunctional protein, if it is translated at all.

A conditional knockout allows gene deletion in a tissue or time specific manner. This is done by introducing short sequences called loxP sites around the gene. These sequences will be introduced into the germ-line via the same mechanism as a knock-in. This germ-line can then be crossed to another germline containing Cre-recombinase which is a bacterial enzyme that can recognize these sequences, recombines them and deletes the gene flanked by these sites.

Full article ▸

related documents
Embryo
Intracytoplasmic sperm injection
Arachnophobia
Trypanosome
Eardrum
Rib
Chronobiology
Coprophagia
Hibernation
Vibrio cholerae
Ossicles
Bluethroat
Hebe (genus)
Oleaceae
Moth
Chestnut blight
Thelypteridaceae
Amphiuma
Bee Orchid
Commensalism
Scaevola
Dipper
Azalea
Crab
Trees of Britain and Ireland
Nightingale
Oology
Milkweed butterfly
Anomalocarid
Aster (genus)