Surfactant

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{@card@, make, design}
{specie, animal, plant}
{household, population, female}
{group, member, jewish}

Surfactants are compounds that lower the surface tension of a liquid, allowing easier spreading, and lowering of the interfacial tension between two liquids, or between a liquid and a solid. Surfactants may act as detergents, wetting agents, emulsifiers, foaming agents, and dispersants.

Contents

Etymology

The term surfactant is a blend of surface active agent.[1] Surfactants are usually organic compounds that are amphiphilic, meaning they contain both hydrophobic groups (their tails) and hydrophilic groups (their heads). Therefore, a surfactant molecule contains both a water insoluble (or oil soluble component) and a water soluble component. Surfactant molecules will migrate to the water surface, where the insoluble hydrophobic group may extend out of the bulk water phase, either into the air or, if water is mixed with an oil, into the oil phase, while the water soluble head group remains in the water phase. This alignment and aggregation of surfactant molecules at the surface, acts to alter the surface properties of water at the water/air or water/oil interface.

In Index Medicus and the United States National Library of Medicine, surfactant is reserved for the meaning pulmonary surfactant. For the more general meaning, surface active agent is the heading.

Properties

Surfactants reduce the surface tension of water by adsorbing at the liquid-gas interface. They also reduce the interfacial tension between oil and water by adsorbing at the liquid-liquid interface. Many surfactants can also assemble in the bulk solution into aggregates. Examples of such aggregates are vesicles and micelles. The concentration at which surfactants begin to form micelle is known as the critical micelle concentration (CMC). When micelles form in water, their tails form a core that can encapsulate an oil droplet, and their (ionic/polar) heads form an outer shell that maintains favorable contact with water. When surfactants assemble in oil, the aggregate is referred to as a reverse micelle. In a reverse micelle, the heads are in the core and the tails maintain favorable contact with oil. Surfactants are also often classified into four primary groups; anionic, cationic, non-ionic, and zwitterionic (dual charge).

Full article ▸

related documents
Potassium ferrocyanide
Ununennium
Uraninite
Octahedrite
List of synthetic polymers
Thermal diffusivity
Calamine (mineral)
Johannes Nicolaus Brønsted
Hypoxanthine
Isoleucine
Phenyl group
Perlite
Katharometer
Coenzyme A
Ulexite
Allene
Putrescine
Periodic table (standard)
Vitamin E
Genetic material
Chemisorption
Physical chemistry
Ketene
Ornithine
Cobalt bomb
Leucine
HMX
Valine
Anatase
Soman