Skip over navigation

Anschutz Distinguished Fellowship in American Studies


The Anschutz Distinguished Fellow is appointed annually by the Princeton University Program in American Studies.

Endowed in 1997 through the generosity of Philip and Nancy Anschutz, and their daughters Sarah Anschutz Hunt ’93 and Elizabeth Anschutz ’96, the Anschutz Fellow program is designed to bring to Princeton for one semester a leading scholar or practitioner in American arts, letters, politics, or commerce. The chief goal is to widen the Program’s intellectual horizons, and offer an accomplished figure the chance to take part in Princeton’s singular scholarly, teaching, and social life.

Applications are encouraged from those with non-academic as well as academic credentials. Junior scholars are also eligible to apply, but will be appointed only if their applications show promise of making an exceptional contribution.

The Anschutz Distinguished Fellow teaches one multidisciplinary seminar course for upper-division undergraduates. Generally, admission to the course is by application, with preference given to students enrolled in the American Studies Program. Each semester consists of twelve teaching weeks, plus a one week break at mid-semester and a three-week reading and exam period. In addition to giving the course, each visitor will deliver one public lecture to an audience drawn generally from faculty, graduate students, and interested members of the larger Princeton community.

Each Fellow is expected to reside on or near campus, unless he or she can arrange residency within comfortable commuting distance of Princeton.  Fellows have access to all University scholarly facilities, including libraries and computers. There will be a fee for the use of University athletic facilities, if desired.

Each fellow will have a campus office near the American Studies Program office, equipped with a computer, printer, and telephone.  The Fellow will be appointed as Lecturer to an appropriate academic department as well as to the American Studies Program.

 



The Photographer as Sociologist/The Historian as Photographer

Sunday, November 16, 2014
4:30 p.m.
"Dorothea Lange:  Grab a Hunk of Lightning" 
film screening of PBS American Masters series documentary followed by discussion with the filmmaker, Dyanna Taylor, Anschutz Distinguished Fellow Richard Steven Street and Professor Linda Gordon of NYU

Monday, November 17
4:30 p.m.
"Photographer's Double/Searching for Cover:  The Historian as Photographer/the Photographer as Historian"
Richard Steven Street will explore the challenge of crossing disciplines to carry on, extend, and amplify the work of Dorothea Lange.  Followed by discussion with Dr. Street, Ms. Taylor, and Professor Martha Sandweiss


Bios of participants

both events in 101 McCormick Hall

cosponsored by the Program in Visual Arts, the Department of History, the Department of Sociology, The Department of Art and Archaeology, and the Princeton Art Museum

supported by a generous gift of Philip F. Anschutz and family

free and open to the public

Fall 2014 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow

Street

RICHARD STEVEN STREET is a historian of photography, labor, California, and the American West, focusing on farm labor and its attendant issues. He has received many California journalism and photojournalism prizes, and numerous academic awards.
 
Dr. Street has photographed and written essays on Haiti’s transition from dictatorship to democracy to anarchy; TB; the U.S.-Mexico border; the United Farm Workers Union; corporate farming; organic agriculture; the wine industry; the UC Davis department of Viticulture and Enology; and the immigrant community of canyon campers in North San Diego County. He has produced a comprehensive, six-volume history of California farmworkers 1679-2000, including two volumes on the photographers and photography, two on the contemporary situation, and two works of narrative history describing the emergence of the farmworker class and the struggle to organize and develop countervailing power.
 
Dr. Street is presently completing a memoir, Photographer’s Double: An Independent Historian Adrift in the California Agro-Industry at Millenium’s End, along with three books, John Lewis: Photographs of the California Grape Strike; Subversive Images: Leonard Nadel’s Photo Essay on Braceros in 1956; and Knife Fight City, his 26-year photo essay (color) about life in California’s poorest town.
He will teach a spring term course on “The Engaged Photographer: Liberation Photography in the Age of Narcissism,” and deliver a public lecture on “Photographer’s Double: the Historian as Photographer, the Photographer as Historian.”

Spring 2014 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow


GERARDINE WURZBURG is an Academy Award-winning producer and director of documentary films. Over the last thirty years, she has focused on trends in disability rights, advocacy, social justice, education, science and health. Her work represents a commitment to use media to encourage dialogue and progressive social change. Since the 1980s, she has focused her talents on the advancement of full inclusion for persons with disabilities and the promotion of self-advocacy. Her major works in disability rights include: Regular Lives, Educating Peter, Graduating Peter, Autism is a World, and Wretches & Jabberers
 
Dr. Wurzburg will teach a spring-term seminar titled “A History of Disability told by Personal Narratives.” Her public presentation will include a screening of her film Wretches and Jabberers, as well as a conversation with two of the individuals featured in the film.


Wednesday
February 12
7:30 p.m.
106 McCormick Hall

 

Final Work Showcase for students in AMS 317
Social Media: History, Poetics, and Practice
Hosted by Judy Malloy

See here for more information


Social Media History and Poetics

Anschutz Symposium Fall 2013




December 2, 2013
4:30 pm
222 Bowen Hall

Social Media History and Poetics
Hosted by Judy Malloy

See here for poster and bios

For video of the symposium, click here.


Fall 2013 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow



Judy Malloy
 is a new media poet and critic, who has been working in the fields of computer-mediated literature and social media for over 27 years. 

A pioneer on the Internet and in electronic literature, Judy Malloy followed a vision of hypertextual narrative that she began in the 1970s with experimental artist books created in card catalog and electro-mechanical structures.  In the 27 years since she first wrote Uncle Roger on Art Com Electronic Network, she has composed an innovative body of hypertextual narrative poetry , including the Eastgate generative hypertext its name was Penelope and a series of  social media-based narratives created  in the Computer Science Laboratory at Xerox PARC . She strives for a poetic clarity, so that each lexia -- an idea developed in the handmade books -- transcends the computer screen and can either stand by itself or be combined in the reading or array to create a larger narrative.   Her work has been exhibited and published internationally.

Malloy has also been active in documenting new media and is the host of Authoring Software, a resource for teachers and students. As an arts writer, she has worked most notably as Editor of The New York Foundation for the Arts NYFA Current, (formerly Arts Wire Current) an Internet-based National journal on the arts and culture.

Her papers are archived as The Judy Malloy Papers at the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University.

Judy Malloy will teach a fall term course entitled “Social Media:  History, Poetics, and Practice.”  She will deliver a public lecture on “Social Media Poetics.”


Spring 2013 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow


Paul Berman (Spring 2013) is a writer on literature and politics who contributes to The New Republic, The New York Times Book Review and other journals. He is the author of two books on the history of the modern left in the United States and other countries: "A Tale of Two Utopias" and "Power and the Idealists." And he is the author of two books on controversies surrounding the Islamist political movement: "Terror and Liberalism," which was a New York Times best-seller in 2003, and "The Flight of the Intellectuals." His books have been translated into fifteen languages.  He is, in addition, the editor of a number of anthologies, including "Blacks and Jews," "Debating P.C.," and "Carl Sandburg: Selected Poems."

Mr. Berman has been the recipient of a MacArthur fellowship, a Guggenheim fellowship, and other awards.

Fall 2012 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow


David Binder (Fall 2012) has produced Broadway, Off-Broadway, festivals and spectacular events.  Credits include the Tony Award winning Broadway revival of Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, starring Sean Combs, Audra McDonald, and Phylicia Rashad, which was widely recognized for attracting a hugely diverse audience to Broadway. More recently, David produced the Broadway premiere of Moises Kaufman’s 33 Variations, which marked Jane Fonda’s return to the stage after a 45 year absence. In collaboration with CTG, David subsequently reunited Fonda and the New York cast for performances in Los Angeles. He has produced five shows with the Donmar Warehouse, including Frost/Nixon and Mary Stuart on Broadway, Lobby Hero, Voyage Around My Father with Derek Jacobi, and Guys and Dolls with Ewan McGregor and Jane Krakowski, in the West End.
 
Off Broadway, at De La Guarda, a group of flying Argentines literally lifted a young, international crowd off its feet for more than six years. David produced the Argentines’ follow up, Fuerza Bruta, which is now in its fifth year of performances. He is the original producer of John Cameron Mitchell and Stephen Trask’s rowdy, loud and ultimately sweet rock ‘n’ roll musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch. With Lisa Kron’s Obie Award winning 2.5 Minute Ride and Danny Hoch’s Taking Over, David has showed his support for new writing that is polemical, political and hilarious.In 2007, David mounted The High Line Festival, curated by David Bowie, which featured performances by Arcade Fire, Air, Laurie Anderson, Meow, Meow, The Polyphonic Spree and, in his American stand-up comedy debut, Ricky Gervais.  The festival raised money and awareness for New York’s newest public space, The High Line. More recently, he produced The New Island Festival, ten days of Dutch site-specific theater, dance, music and visual art on New York’s Governors Island.
 
David has produced numerous events around the globe. Credits include IBM's 100th Anniversary: Short Ride in a Fast Machine at Lincoln Center with Steve Martin, Jessye Norman, Joshua Bell, Morgan Freeman and Patti LaBelle, and The Public Sings: A 50th Anniversary Celebration for the Public Theater with Meryl Streep, Ben Stiller, Natalie Portman and Mike Nichols. His Broadway reading of The Normal Heart, which featured Barbra Streisand, was recorded and later released by Simon and Schuster Audio. To commemorate World AIDS Day in 2009 and 2010, the United Nations and Broadway Cares enlisted David Binder Productions to create an event where major landmarks across New York City extinguished their lights. An event to mark the occasion was held both years in Washington Square Park with guests including U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, Naomi Watts, Susan Sarandon, Kenneth Cole, and Liza Minnelli.
 
David is a four time Tony nominee. He has been honored by Performance Space 122 and is the recipient of the Robert Whitehead Award for Outstanding Achievement in Commercial Theatrical Producing. He is a frequent public speaker and is on the faculty of the Yale School of Drama.
 
For more information, please see http://davidbinderproductions.com/productions/
 
 

Anschutz Lecture

David Binder

Adventures in the Theater
a conversation with Karen Fricker

Wednesday, November 28
4:30 p.m.
106 McCormick
 
Theater critic Karen Fricker interviews Broadway producer David Binder (the Tony Award winning productions of 33 Variations with Jane Fonda, Raisin in the Sun with Sean Combs, Phylicia Rashad and Audra McDonald) about his experiences producing on Broadway and off.

Karen Fricker is a theatre critic and academic. Currently the Eakin Visiting Scholar in Canadian Studies at McGill University in Montreal, from January she will be an assistant professor in Dramatic Arts at Brock University in Ontario. Originally from Los Angeles, she earned a PhD from the School of Drama, Trinity College, Dublin, and has taught at the University of London. She is the founding editor of Irish Theatre Magazine and has written and broadcast for the Guardian, Variety, the Irish Times, The New York Times, the BBC, and the CBC, amongst other outlets.
 
video platform video management video solutions video player &height=NaN&width=&fullscreen=true&showicons=true"> video platform video management video solutions video player &height=NaN&width=&fullscreen=true&showicons=true">

Fall 2011 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow


Jenny Price  (Fall 2011) is a writer, Los Angeles Urban Ranger, and Research Scholar at the UCLA Center for the Study of Women. She's written often about environment, Los Angeles, and environmentalism, and about gun control, the Malibu beach wars, public space, and swag lounges.  Author of "Thirteen Ways of Seeing Nature in L.A." and Flight Maps: Adventures with Nature in Modern America, she's written also for GOOD, Sunset, Believer, Audubon, New York Times, and Los Angeles Times, and writes the Green Me Up, JJ not-quite advice column on LA Observed.

 
She gives frequent tours of the concrete L.A. River, to emphasize its central importance to L.A.'s past, present, and  future. With the Urban Rangers art collective, she has conducted such projects as Downtown L.A. Trail System and Public Access 101: Malibu Public Beaches; has led workshops in the U.S. and abroad; and has been a resident artist at the Orange County Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art.
 
She has taught at UCLA, USC, and Antioch-Los Angeles, and has been a Guggenheim and two-time NEH fellow. She has an A.B. from Princeton University--where as a biology major she studied the white-winged trumpeters of the Amazon rain forest--and a Ph.D. in history from Yale University, where she studied the plastic pink flamingos of the American grasslands.
 

She lives on Venice Beach.



"Cup and Gown" project built by Ivan Charnonneau in AMS 307


The Art of Sustainability

Subhankar Banerjee , photographer and activist, founder, ClimateStoryTellers
   Director's Visitor, Institute for Advanced Study
Fritz Haeg , artist, designer, gardener-Edible Estates, Animal Estates
   Princeton Atelier (Spring 2012), Lewis Center for the Arts
Jenny Price , co-founder, Los Angeles Urban Rangers art collective
   Anschutz Distinguished Fellow in American Studies

Moderator: Joe Scanlan , Director of Visual Arts, Lewis Center for the Arts 

 Monday, December 5
4:30 p.m.
James M. Stewart '32 Theater at the Lewis Center for the Arts

Free and open to the public
See here for more information

Sponsored by the Program in American Studies, the Office of Sustainability, the Program in Visual Arts, the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies, the Princeton Atelier, and the Princeton Environmental Institute

See here for video



Rivers R Us:
Reviving Rivers, Reinventing Cities

Jenny Price
Anschutz Distinguished Fellow
in American Studies
Janette Kim
Urban Landscape Lab, Columbia University GSAPP


Wednesday, December 7
5:00 p.m.
10 Guyot Hall

See here for more information 

Sponsored by American Studies Program,
the Office of Sustainability,
and the Princeton Environmental Institute

See here for video of lecture



2010-2011 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow:

Michael J. Golec (Spring 2011) is Associate Professor of the History of Design at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Golec’s scholarship focuses on twentieth century design in the United States as it intersects with the history of art, the history of technology and science, and philosophical aesthetics. While his interests range across and touch on all manner of designed objects, Golec’s research emphasizes graphic design, visual communications, and print culture. He is the author of Brillo Box Archive: Aesthetics, Design, and Art (Hanover: Dartmouth College Pres, 2008) and, along with Aron Vinegar, co-edited and contributed to Relearning from Las Vegas (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009). Golec has published articles and reviews in Design and Culture, the Journal of Design History, Design Issues, Senses and Society, Cultural Critique, and American Quarterly. His article “‘Motionmindedness:’ The Transposition of Movement from Factory to Home in Chaplin’s Modern Times” is forthcoming in the journal Home Cultures.
 
Golec is teaching a spring course titled, Pictographic Modernity in the United States
Course Description: The American visual landscape is replete with graphics dedicated to encouraging and detailing the reform of city, country, housing, farming, factory work and housework, health, and culture. This seminar will study the history of the tabulation of statistical data and its graphic representation in the form of pictographs, charts, diagrams, plans, maps, and other methods of illustration and inscription. Students will gain a thorough understanding of how it was that graphical methods worked to influence policy makers and to fix reforms in the minds of the American public.


R.E.A./X
Pictographic Mobility and Rural Electrification in the United States

Anschutz Lecture
Michael J. Golec
Anschutz Distinguished Fellow
4:30 p.m.
Wednesday, March 30
101 McCormick Hall

ANSCHUTZ LECTURE: R.E.A./X: Pictographic Mobility and Rural Electrification in the United States, by Michael J. Golec


JOURNALISTIC CRITICISM 
a conversation with 
TERRENCE RAFFERTY 
 
Wednesday, January 5, 2011
4:30 - 6:00 p.m.
East Pyne 111

Terrence Rafferty was born in Brooklyn and raised on Long Island, and received a BA in modern literature, philosophy, and creative writing from Cornell University in 1973.  He attended Brown University for one year, in the MFA program in Creative Writing, then returned to Cornell for postgraduate studies in Comparative Literature; he received an MA in 1977, and taught as a lecturer in the department in 1978-79.  Growing bored with his dissertation, he moved to New York and worked for Doubleday and Co. for five years, primarily editing genre fiction: mysteries, westerns, science fiction, fantasy, and horror.  He began to write reviews and essays about books, films, and television in the early 80s, which appeared in such publications as Film Quarterly, Sight and Sound, The Atlantic, Vogue, Newsday, The Village Voice, The Boston Phoenix, The Nation, and The New Yorker.  In the mid-80s he wrote a fiction column for The Nation, and later became its film critic.  He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in film studies in 1987.  In 1988 he was hired as a staff writer by The New Yorker, reviewing books and films; most of his better than 200 pieces for the magazine appeared in the “Current Cinema” column.  Rafferty left The New Yorker in 1997 to become Critic-at-Large for GQ magazine, where he wrote a monthly column on the arts for the next six years; he was a finalist for a National Magazine Award in 2002.  Since 2003, he has been a regular contributor to The New York Times, usually appearing in the Arts & Leisure section and the Book Review (to which he also contributes an occasional column on horror).  He currently also contributes book reviews to Slate and writes booklet essays for the Criterion Collection, and is the East Coast correspondent for DGA Quarterly, the journal of the Directors Guild of America.
     In 1996 Rafferty was the McGraw Fellow in Writing at Princeton, teaching a seminar on critical writing in the Council of the Humanities; he offered a similar course in the Writing Program the following year.  He has also taught at Columbia, and has lectured or presented films at many institutions, including Yale, Cornell, Ohio State, Wesleyan, UC Berkeley, Walker Arts Center (Minneapolis), High Art Museum (Atlanta), the American Museum of the Moving Image (Queens, NY), and the Jacob Burns Film Center (Pleasantville, NY).  A selection of his writings on film, The Thing Happens, was published by Grove/Atlantic in 1993; individual essays and reviews have appeared in several anthologies and textbooks, including The Princeton Anthology of Writing, Cinema Nation, Best American Movie Writing 1999, Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures, five anthologies compiled by the National Society of Film Critics, and the Norton Critical Edition of E.M. Forster's Howards End.

Terrence Rafferty was the Fall 2010 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow in the Program in American Studies and taught a course called “The Fear of God:  American Horror from Jonathan Edwards to Cloverfield.”


RXML parse error: Illegal arguments or image: Bad argument 1 to sizeof().
 | <emit background-color="#ffffff" format="jpeg" maxwidth="" nodata="yes" source="cimg" src="/ams/events/Rafferty-poster.jpg.bmp">
 | <eval>
 | <else>
 | <if variable="page.filename != subcontent.xml">
 | <cache enable-protocol-cache="yes">

Anschutz Lecture

Terrence Rafferty
The Fear of God:
Some Thoughts on American Horror
Tuesday, November 30
5:00 p.m.
101 McCormick
 

Rafferty Lecture

2010-2011 Anschutz Distinguished Fellow:

Terrence Rafferty (Fall 2010) was  born in Brooklyn and raised on Long Island, and received a BA in modern literature, philosophy, and creative writing from Cornell University in 1973.  He attended  Brown University for one year, in the MFA program in Creative Writing, then returned to Cornell for postgraduate studies in Comparative Literature; he received an MA in 1977, and taught as a lecturer in the department in 1978-79.  Growing bored with his dissertation, he moved to New York and worked for Doubleday and Co. for five years, primarily editing genre fiction: mysteries, westerns, science fiction, fantasy, and horror.  He began to write reviews and essays about books, films, and television in the early 80s, which appeared in such publications as Film Quarterly, Sight and Sound, The Atlantic, Vogue, Newsday, The Village Voice, The Boston Phoenix, The Nation, and The New Yorker.  In the mid-80s he wrote a fiction column for The Nation, and later became its film critic.  He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in film studies in 1987.  In 1988 he was hired as a staff writer by The New Yorker, reviewing books and films; most of his better than 200 pieces for the magazine appeared in the Current Cinema column.  Rafferty left The New Yorker in 1997 to become Critic-at-Large for GQ magazine, where he wrote a monthly column on the arts for the next six years; he was a finalist for a National Magazine Award in 2002.  Since 2003, he has been a regular  contributor to The New York Times, usually appearing in the Arts & Leisure section and the Book Review (to which he also contributes an occasional column on horror).  He currently also contributes book reviews to Slate and writes booklet essays for the Criterion Collection, and is the East Coast correspondent for DGA Quarterly, the journal of the Directors Guild of America.
     In 1996 Rafferty was the McGraw Fellow in Writing at Princeton, teaching a seminar on critical writing in the Council of the Humanities; he offered a similar course in the Writing Program the following year.  He has also taught at Columbia, and has lectured or presented films at many institutions, including Yale, Cornell, Ohio State, Wesleyan, UC Berkeley, Walker Arts Center (Minneapolis), High Art Museum (Atlanta), the American Museum of the Moving Image (Queens, NY), and the Jacob Burns Film Center (Pleasantville, NY).  A selection of his writings on film, The Thing Happens, was published by Grove/Atlantic in 1993; individual essays and reviews have appeared in several anthologies and textbooks, including The Princeton Anthology of Writing, Cinema Nation, Best American Movie Writing 1999, Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures, five anthologies compiled by the National Society of Film Critics, and the Norton Critical Edition of E.M. Forster's Howards End.


Previous Anschutz Distinguished Fellows:

Kenneth Goldsmith (spring 2010) is an accomplished poet and the author of nine books of poetry, founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb, and the editor I'll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews. He is the host of a weekly radio show on New York City's WFMU and he teaches writing at The University of Pennsylvania. He taught a seminar titled "Uncreative Writing" in the Spring 2010 semester. 

Ken Emerson
(spring 1999) music critic, author of Doo-Dah: Stephen Foster and the Rise of American Popular Culture. Mr. Emerson taught an American Studies seminar on American music, literature, and painting from 1800-1865, and delivered a public lecture titled "Life After Elvis: How the Brill Building Reconstructed Rock’n’Roll."

Greil Marcus (fall 2000) cultural critic, author of Mystery Train and Invisible Republic. Mr. Marcus taught a seminar titled "Prophecy and the American Voice," and lectured on the same topic, as exemplified in the work of the singer and storyteller David Thomas. 

Bonnie Marranca, (spring 2001) performance critic and Professor of Art and Performance at the University of Texas, Dallas, co-founder and editor of Peforming Arts Journal and PAJ Publications.  Ms. Marranca taught and lectured on contemporary performance in the United States.

Jeff Shesol (spring 2002) former Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Director of Speechwriting at the Clinton White House, and founding partner of West Wing Writers, LLC, taught a course titled "Behind the Bully Pulpit:  The History of the Presidential Speech," and lectured on the same topic.

Steve Fraser (spring 2003), writer and editor, and author of Wall Street:  A Cultural History of America's Dream Palace, taught and lectured on the cultural history of Wall Street.

Maurice Ferré (spring 2004) former Mayor of Miami, with distinguished career in politics and policy-making, taught and lectured on the changing American identity.

Wendy Lesser (fall 2004), founder and editor of The Threepenny Review, and editor of several books, including the recent Nothing Remains the Same:  Rereading and Remembering,  taught a course titled "Autobiography and Criticism," and lectured on Joan Didion's latest memoir.

Sheila Curran Bernard (fall 2005), an Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning filmmaker and writer, taught “History on Film,” and curated a series of illustrated talks, "American Visions in Documentary," by distinguished filmmakers including Susan Froemke, Ric Burns, Samuel D. Pollard, Muffie Meyer & Ronald Blumer, and herself.   Bernard’s broadcast credits include I’ll Make Me A World, Eyes on the Prize, and School: The Story of American Public Education. She is the author of Documentary Storytelling.

Chris Hedges (Spring 2006), a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times, has written several important books on war and religion, including the highly acclaimed War is a Force that Gives Us Meaning.  He taught and lectured on "The Christian Right and the Open Society."

Lee Clarke (Spring 2007), Associate Professor of Sociology at Rutgers University and author of Worst Cases:  Terror and Catastrophe in the Popular Imagination, taught a seminar on "Disaster, Culture, and Society."

Heather Hendershot (Fall 2007), Associate Professor of Media Studies at Queens College, CUNY; Coordinator of the Film Studies Certificate Program at the CUNY Graduate center; and editor of Cinema Journal, is the author of Shaking the World for Jesus:  Media and Conservative Evangelical Culture; Nickelodeon Nation:  The History, Politics, and Economics of America's Only TV Channel for Kids; and Saturday Morning Censors:  Television Regulation Before the V-Chip.  She taught a seminar titled "Children's Television:  History, Politics, Economics." 

Nicholas Dawidoff (Spring 2008) is the author of four books, including  The Catcher Was A Spy: The Mysterious Life Of Moe Berg  and his latest published In May 2008, The Crowd Sounds Happy: A Story of Love, Madness and Baseball.   He taught a seminar titled "Americans at Work and at Play."

Kandia Crazy Horse (Spring 2009) is a Manhattan-based rock critic, and the editor of Rip It Up: The Black Experience in Rock & Roll, a selective history of black rockers (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004). She is the former music editor at Creative Loafing in Charlotte, NC, and her work has appeared in numerous publications including  Paper, Harp, and the San Francisco Bay Guardian.   She taught a seminar titled "Roll Over Beethoven: Blacks, Rock & Roll and Cultural Revolt."