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People

Director

Amaney JamalAmaney Jamal is an associate professor of politics at Princeton University and director of the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice. Her interests include the study of Muslim and Arab Americans and the pathways that structure their patterns of civic engagement in the U.S. The focus of her current research is democratization and the politics of civic engagement in the Arab world. Jamal's books include Barriers to Democracy, which explores the role of civic associations in promoting democratic effects in the Arab world (winner 2008 APSA Best Book Award in comparative democratization); and, as coauthor, Race and Arab Americans Before and After 9/11: From Invisible Citizens to Visible Subjects (2007) and Citizenship and Crisis: Arab Detroit after 9/11 (2009). Her current book project is Of Empires and Citizens (under contract at Princeton University Press). In addition to her role as director of Princeton's Workshop on Arab Political Development, Jamal is a codirector of Princeton's Luce Project on Migration, Participation, and Democratic Governance in the U.S., Europe, and the Muslim World; principal investigator of theArab Barometer Project, winner of the Best Dataset in the Field of Comparative Politics( Lijphart/Przeworski/Verba Dataset Award 2010); co-PI of the Detroit Arab American Study, a sister survey to the Detroit Area Study; and senior advisor on the Pew Research Center projects focusing on Islam in America (2006) and Global Islam (2010). Ph.D. University of Michigan.

Workshop Manager
Christine Riley
103 Bobst Hall
T. 609.258.8237
F. 609-258-7762

 

Executive Committee

Nancy CoffinNancy Coffin is a senior lecturer in Arabic in the Department of Near Eastern Studies. She teaches all levels of Arabic as well as Colloquial Levantine Arabic. Her doctoral dissertation examined Palestinian novels and resistance narratives written in the wake of the 1967 Arab-Israeli War. Ph.D. Columbia University.

 

Abdallah HammoudiAbdellah Hammoudi is a professor in the Department of Anthropology. Hammoudi was the founding director of the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. He has done extensive work on the ethnohistory of his native Morocco, Libya, and Saudi Arabia, as well as participated in development projects in these countries. His books include The Victim an Its Masks, Master and Disciple, and A Season in Mecca. He teaches courses on social theory, French ethnographic theory, colonialism, and Islamic social movements. Ph.D.  Sorbonne.

Bernard HaykelBernard Haykel is a professor of Near Easter Studies and director of the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. His research and teaching interests center on the intellectual, political and social history of the Middle East with particular emphasis on the countries of the Arabian Peninsula.  His current research and writing project relates to the history of the Wahhabi movement in Saudi Arabia from the 1950s to the present. Ph.D. University of Oxford.

Miriam KunklerMirjam Künkler is an assistant professor in the Department of Near Eastern Studies and codirector of the Luce Project on Migration, Participation, and Democratic Governance in the U.S., Europe, and the Muslim World. Her research interests are in comparative politics and political theory and focus on comparative relations between religion and state in the Muslim world. She is currently working on a monograph that analyzes the impact of contemporary Islamic thought and social movement activism on the transformation of authoritarian rule in Iran (1989–2005) and Indonesia (1974–98), and on an edited volume on new jurisprudential approaches to the question of government in Iran. Künkler is co-PI of the "Iran Social Science Data Project" funded by the Social Science Research Council . Ph.D. Columbia University.

Cyrus SchayeghCyrus Schayegh is an assistant professor in the Department of Near Eastern Studies. His areas of interest include the social history of the Middle East and the Levant, the history of Arab-Israeli relations, and modern Iran. His main current project seeks to re-read the formation of the post-Ottoman Levant by examining the interaction, across that region, of new states and cross-border movements of goods and people. Ph.D. Columbia University.

 

 
 
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