Skip over navigation
Faculty
Click on each name for a short bio
Assistant Professor
308 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3732
19th Century European Art
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2008
Assistant Professor
309 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-1322
Classical Archaeology
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2010
Professor
404 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3784
Early Chinese Art and Archaeology
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1981
Professor
372 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-0352
Early Christian, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Art
Ph.D., Courtald Institute of Art, University of London, 1989
Professor, Director of Graduate Studies
403 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3789
History of Modern Architecture
Ph.D., Yale University, 1987
Associate Professor
307 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3774
American Art
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2001
Associate Professor
223 East Pyne
(609) 258-7258
20th Century Art
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1996
Townsend Martin '17 Professor of Art & Archaeology
314 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3790
20th Century Art
Ph.D., City University of New York, 1990
Assistant Professor
315 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-5319
Northern Renaissance Art
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2003
Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology
313 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3760
European Art and Architecture 1500-1800 in its Global Context; World Art History; Geography and Historiography of Art
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1977; Doctor Philosophiae Honoris Causa, Technische Universität Dresden, 2010; Doctor Historiae Artium Honoris Causa, Masaryk University, Brno, 2013
Professor
401 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-9098
Roman Art and Architecture; Hellenistic Art; Renaissance Antiquarianism
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1991
David Hunter McAlpin Professor of the History of Photography and Modern Art
310 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-0914
History of Photography and Modern Art
Ph.D., Yale University, 1980
Associate Professor
305 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-7456
African and African Diaspora Art
Ph.D., Emory University, 2004
P. Y. & Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History
406 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-6249
Chinese Art and Archaeology
Ph.D., Stanford University, 1974
Assistant Professor
306 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3771
Contemporary Art and Criticism
Ph.D., Yale University, 2008
Professor
316 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-9338
Japanese Art and Archaeology
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1994
Lecturer with Rank of Professor
Professor
Institute for Advanced Study
(609) 734-8000
Twentieth-century European and American Art
Director of the Art Museum
142 Art Museum
(609) 258-2870
18th-Century European Art
PhD, Oxford University, 1992
Lecturers
Perkins-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows
304 McCormick Hall
609-258-8593
European Art 1500-1800
Ph.D., University of Cambridge, 2012
Lecturer in the Council of the Humanities and Art and Archaeology
204 Scheide Caldwell House
(609) 258-8858
Classic Maya Art and Society
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2007
Peter Jay Sharp, *52, Curator and Lecturer
251 Art Museum
(609) 258-8805
Art of the Ancient Americas
Ph.D., Tulane University, 2006
Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows
205A Scheide Caldwell House
(609) 258-8860
Egyptology
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2012
Lecturer
311 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3797
Italian Renaissance Art
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2008
Lecturer
312 McCormick Hall
(609)258-6313
Medieval and/or Renaissance-Baroque Architecture
Ph.D., Princeton University, 2009
Associate Professional Specialist
302 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-1423
Eastern Mediterranean and Near Eastern Art and Archaeology
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1994
Research Staff
Emeriti
Professor
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3798
Renaissance Art
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1983
Emeritus
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3794
History of Photography and Modern Art
Professor
372 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3778
Classical Art & Archaeology
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1971
Professor
(609) 258-3782
Early Christian/Byzantine Architecture and Monumental Decoration
Ph.D., New York University, 1971
Emeritus
(609) 258-3782
Chinese Art
Ph.D., Princeton, 1958
Emeritus
(609) 258-3782
20th-Century Art
Emeritus
(609) 258-3782
Northern Renaissance Art
Professor
Roman Art
Ph.D., Göttingen University, 1986
Howard Crosby Butler Memorial Professor of Art & Archaeology
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3799
Renaissance and Baroque Architecture
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1976
Professor
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3769
Classical Archaeology
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1966
Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology
Japanese Art
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1974
Christopher B. Sarofim '86 Professor of American Art, Emeritus
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3785
American Art
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1965
TDK
Kaufmann
Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology
Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann
313 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3760
European Art and Architecture 1500-1800 in its Global Context; World Art History; Geography and Historiography of Art
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1977; Doctor Philosophiae Honoris Causa, Technische Universität Dresden, 2010; Doctor Historiae Artium Honoris Causa, Masaryk University, Brno, 2013
CV (pdf)

Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann teaches courses on art and architecture of the sixteenth to the eighteenth century in Europe and its relations with other parts of the world. His teaching includes seminars and classes on the literature of art, old master drawings, Central European Art, the art of Latin America, the geography of art, global exchange in art, the possibilities of world art history, and art, science, and magic. Professor Kaufmann has recently advised students who have written or are writing dissertations on Jesuit art in Japan, on seventeenth-century poets and painters in Silesia, on architecture and culture in seventeenth-century Sweden, on architectural theory in late eighteenth-century Poland, on Puncinello themes in the art of G. B. Tiepolo, on occult themes in the German Renaissance, and on the architect and theorist Wenzel Dietterlin; on Bonifaz Wohlmut and the origins of Renaissance architecture in the Czech lands; and on the Hyperborean Baroque (visual culture in seventeenth-century Sweden).

In December 2010 Professor Kaufmann was awarded the degree of Doctor philosophiae honoris causa by the Technische Universität, Dresden. The diploma presented to him at a ceremony held in Dresden in May 2011 cited the quality of his scholarship, especially on Central Europe, its application as a basis in the effort to establish a more global history of art, and his services for international collaboration and mutual understanding among nations. At the ceremony Professor Kaufmann lectured on Natural History and Art in Dresden.

In November 2013, he was awarded the degree of Doctor Historiae Artium Honoris Causa by Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. He is the first non-Czech scholar to be awarded this degree by the university.

After spending the first term teaching at Princeton, Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann was on leave in Spring Term 2013, when from January through May he was Nina Maria Gorrissen Fellow in History at the American Academy in Berlin. In June he was the Director’s visitor at the German Art Historical Institute in Florence, where he had been invited to collaborate on global art history projects, and conducted several seminars. He delivered keynote lectures on world art history at an International Conference co-sponsored by the École Normale Supérieure, Paris, and Purdue University in September; at an international conference on New Directions in Latin American Art History at the University of Hamburg in January; and at a symposium on World Art History at the Schloss in Dresden in May. He delivered “Reflections on World Art History” as the Nina Maria Gorrissen Lecture at the American Academy in Berlin in February, at the Mickiewicz University Poznań, Poland, in March, and at the University of Greifswald in April. He lectured on the “Spirit of the Place” at the University of Göttingen in April, and at the Technical University, Berlin in May. In March Professor Kaufmann was invited to the Palacký University in Olomouc, Czech Republic, where he gave three lectures.

In addition to aiding various American and European fellowship committees and universities on appointment and scholarship decisions, Professor Kaufmann continued to serve as a panel member and external advisor to the Fellowship Committee of the European Research Council, in conjunction with which he attended a meeting in Brussels. He also was a member of an external committee that evaluated part of the University of Leiden, Netherlands.

Professor Kaufmann undertook a major new responsibility as editor-in-chief of the Oxford Bibliography of the History of Art, scheduled to be launched in mid-2013. For this project he wrote the essay on (Western) Historiography of Art History.

During the academic year 2012-2013 Professor Kaufmann published the following articles and books: “Representation, Replication, Reproduction: The Legacy of Charles V in Sculpted Rulers’ Portraits of the Sixteenth and Early Seventeenth Century,” Austrian History Yearbook, xliii, 2012, pp. 1-18; “Linz--des Kaisers Kulturhauptstadt um 1600? Ein Escorial in Oberösterreich? ,” in Linz--des Kaisers Kulturhauptstadt um 1600?, (exhibition catalogue, Linz, Oberösterreichisches Landesmuseum,” Weitra, Bibliothek der Provinz, 2012, pp. 39-54; “ADSIT. Vistas for Rudolfine Research,” in Hans von Aachen in Context Proceedings of the International Conference Prague 22–25 September 2010, ed. Lubomír Konečný and Štěpán Vácha with Beket Bukovinská, Prague, Artefactum, 2012, pp. 245-251; “Centres or Periphery? Art and Architecture in the Empire,” in The Holy Roman Empire, 1495-1806. A European Perspective, ed. R. J. W. Evans and Peter H. Wilson, Leiden and Boston, Brill, 2012, pp. 315-332; “Un Empire d’art: l’Europe Centrale aux alentours de 1550-1630,” in Dürer et son temps. De la Réforme à la Guerre de Trente Ans. Dessins Allemands de l’École des Beaux Arts, ed. Emmanuelle Brugerolles et. al., (exhibition catalogue)Paris, Beaux-Arts de Paris, 2012, pp. 10-14; and “Le génie du lieu. Réflexions critiques,” in Le “génie du lieu.” La réception du langage classique en Europe (1540-1650) : sélection, interprétation, invention, ed. Monique Chatenet et Claude Mignot, Paris, Picard, 2013, pp. 65-74. He also published reviews of Italy & Hungary. Humanism and Art in the Early Renaissance, ed. Péter Farbaky and Louis A. Waldman. Villa I Tatti, Harvard University Press. 2011, Renaissance Quarterly, lxv, no. 3, 2012, pp. 874-6; and of Carina L. Johnson, Cultural Hierarchy in Sixteenth-Century Europe. The Ottomans and the Mexicans, Cambridge etc., Cambridge University Press, 2011, American Historical Review, May, 2013.

Review, Stanisław Mossakowski, King Sigismund Chapel at Cracow Cathedral (1515–1533). trans. Krystyna Malcharek, Cracow, IRSA, 2012, Renaissance Quarterly, forthcoming 2013.

“Historiography of Art History (Western Traditions)”, in Oxford Bibliography of the History of Art, ed. Thomas DaCosta Kaufmann, online launch 2013.