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Faculty
Click on each name for a short bio
Assistant Professor
308 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3732
19th Century European Art
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2008
Assistant Professor
309 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-1322
Classical Archaeology
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2010
Professor
404 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3784
Early Chinese Art and Archaeology
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1981
Professor
372 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-0352
Early Christian, Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Art
Ph.D., Courtald Institute of Art, University of London, 1989
Professor, Director of Graduate Studies
403 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3789
History of Modern Architecture
Ph.D., Yale University, 1987
Associate Professor
307 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3774
American Art
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2001
Associate Professor
223 East Pyne
(609) 258-7258
20th Century Art
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1996
Townsend Martin '17 Professor of Art & Archaeology
314 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3790
20th Century Art
Ph.D., City University of New York, 1990
Assistant Professor
315 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-5319
Northern Renaissance Art
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2003
Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology
313 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3760
European Art and Architecture 1500-1800 in its Global Context; World Art History; Geography and Historiography of Art
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1977; Doctor Philosophiae Honoris Causa, Technische Universität Dresden, 2010; Doctor Historiae Artium Honoris Causa, Masaryk University, Brno, 2013
Professor
401 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-9098
Roman Art and Architecture; Hellenistic Art; Renaissance Antiquarianism
Ph.D., Columbia University, 1991
David Hunter McAlpin Professor of the History of Photography and Modern Art
310 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-0914
History of Photography and Modern Art
Ph.D., Yale University, 1980
Associate Professor
305 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-7456
African and African Diaspora Art
Ph.D., Emory University, 2004
P. Y. & Kinmay W. Tang Professor of Chinese Art History
406 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-6249
Chinese Art and Archaeology
Ph.D., Stanford University, 1974
Assistant Professor
306 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3771
Contemporary Art and Criticism
Ph.D., Yale University, 2008
Professor
316 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-9338
Japanese Art and Archaeology
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1994
Lecturer with Rank of Professor
Professor
Institute for Advanced Study
(609) 734-8000
Twentieth-century European and American Art
Director of the Art Museum
142 Art Museum
(609) 258-2870
18th-Century European Art
PhD, Oxford University, 1992
Lecturers
Perkins-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows
304 McCormick Hall
609-258-8593
European Art 1500-1800
Ph.D., University of Cambridge, 2012
Lecturer in the Council of the Humanities and Art and Archaeology
204 Scheide Caldwell House
(609) 258-8858
Classic Maya Art and Society
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2007
Peter Jay Sharp, *52, Curator and Lecturer
251 Art Museum
(609) 258-8805
Art of the Ancient Americas
Ph.D., Tulane University, 2006
Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows
205A Scheide Caldwell House
(609) 258-8860
Egyptology
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 2012
Lecturer
311 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3797
Italian Renaissance Art
Ph.D., University of Chicago, 2008
Lecturer
312 McCormick Hall
(609)258-6313
Medieval and/or Renaissance-Baroque Architecture
Ph.D., Princeton University, 2009
Associate Professional Specialist
302 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-1423
Eastern Mediterranean and Near Eastern Art and Archaeology
Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1994
Research Staff
Emeriti
Professor
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3798
Renaissance Art
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1983
Emeritus
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3794
History of Photography and Modern Art
Professor
372 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3778
Classical Art & Archaeology
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1971
Professor
(609) 258-3782
Early Christian/Byzantine Architecture and Monumental Decoration
Ph.D., New York University, 1971
Emeritus
(609) 258-3782
Chinese Art
Ph.D., Princeton, 1958
Emeritus
(609) 258-3782
20th-Century Art
Emeritus
(609) 258-3782
Northern Renaissance Art
Professor
Roman Art
Ph.D., Göttingen University, 1986
Howard Crosby Butler Memorial Professor of Art & Archaeology
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3799
Renaissance and Baroque Architecture
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1976
Professor
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3769
Classical Archaeology
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1966
Frederick Marquand Professor of Art and Archaeology
Japanese Art
Ph.D., Princeton University, 1974
Christopher B. Sarofim '86 Professor of American Art, Emeritus
205 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-3785
American Art
Ph.D., Harvard University, 1965
Nathan Arrington
Arrington
Nathan Arrington
Assistant Professor
309 McCormick Hall
(609) 258-1322
Classical Archaeology
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2010

Profile

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2010

Nathan Arrington specializes in classical archaeology and focuses on the material culture of ancient Greece. His monograph Ashes, Images, and Memories: The Presence of the War Dead in Athens, forthcoming from Oxford University Press, examines how monuments, objects, and images, in their ritual and spatial contexts, changed the way that people viewed and remembered military casualties. It draws on a wide range of material and literary evidence to elucidate a public visual rhetoric of service and sacrifice, and traces the private engagement with this ideology across media and spaces. Several articles that have developed from this book project address Athenian topography, sculpture, vase-painting, and epigraphy in their social, cultural, and political contexts.

Arrington’s work explores the intersections of art history and archaeology, addressing the dependence of memory on materiality; tensions between public and private art; non-elite representation and display; epigraphy as monument; and the status of the image and the sign in classical Greece. His research has been supported by grants from the Gates Cambridge Trust and the Fulbright Foundation.

Arrington has excavated at Corinth, Nemea, Mycenae, Polis (Cyprus), and Tel Dor (Israel). He is co-director and USA director of the Molyvoti, Thrace, Archaeological Project (MTAP), a co-operation with the 19th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities under the auspices of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. A large international team uses a wide range of approaches to investigate a trading port on the Thracian Sea in its changing environmental, economic, and cultural contexts, and within evolving regional trade and power networks.

At Princeton, Arrington is an undergraduate advisor and faculty fellow at Mathey College. He is affiliated with the Classics Department and the Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies, and he holds the Class of 1931 Preceptorship.

Teaching Interests

Professor Arrington teaches courses in art history (ancient through medieval), archaeology, and archaeological methods and theory. His classes are organized around specific problems and current research questions, and make as much use as possible of the museum’s collections. They are designed to engage students with artifacts, sites, and other archaeological data, and to teach them how to critically assess primary and secondary evidence. Each summer, Arrington teaches Art 304: “Archaeology in the Field.” Princeton undergraduates are warmly invited to apply to participate in the excavation and survey of an ancient trading port on the north coast of Greece.

Current Research

Arrington is currently working on two research projects. The first, which centers around his excavation and survey work, examines settlement and trade networks in Thrace, and investigates the changing form and function of trading ports (emporia) in the ancient Mediterranean. The second focuses on the Orientalizing period in Greek art and archaeology, examining the contexts, motivations, and implications of Greek relations with the Near East in the Early Iron Age.

Selected Publications

Ashes, Images, and Memories: The Presence of the War Dead in Athens (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).

“Molyvoti, Thrace Archaeological Project (MTAP): 2013 Preliminary Report” (in preparation).
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“Fallen Vessels and Risen Spirits: Conveying the Presence of the Dead on White-Ground Lekythoi,” in Athenian Potters and Painters, vol. 3, ed. John H. Oakley (forthcoming).

“The Form(s) and Date(s) of a Classical War Monument: Re-evaluating IG I3 1163 and the Case for Delion,” Zeitschrift für Papyrologie und Epigraphik 181 (2012).

Review of Griechische Heiligtümer als Erinnerungsorte: Von der Archaik bis in den Hellenismus; Erträge einer internationalen Tagung in Münster, 20.–21. Januar 2006, ed. Matthias Haake and Michael Jung (Franz Steiner Verlag, 2011), in Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 2012.03.32.

“Inscribing Defeat: The Commemorative Dynamics of the Athenian Casualty Lists,” Classical Antiquity 31 (2011).

“Topographic Semantics: The Location of the Athenian Public Cemetery and Its Significance for the Nascent Democracy,” Hesperia 79 (2010).