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The Program in Creative Writing offers Princeton undergraduate students the unique opportunity to pursue original work in fiction, poetry and translation under the guidance of over 20 practicing writers, including Jeffrey Eugenides, Chang-rae Lee, Paul Muldoon, Joyce Carol Oates, James Richardson, Tracy K. Smith, Susan Wheeler, and Edmund White.

Fall 2014

CWR 201Creative Writing (Poetry)(LA)Practice in the original composition of poetry supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student's growth as both creator and reader of literature. This class is open to beginning and intermediate students by application.Tracy K. SmithMeghan E. O'RourkeSusan WheelerMichael C. DickmanMonica Y. Youn
CWR 203Creative Writing (Fiction)(LA)The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers a perspective on the place of literature among the liberal arts. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student's growth as both creator and reader of literature.Joyce Carol OatesEdmund V. WhiteSusan M. ChoiFiona MaazelA.M. HomesChang-rae LeeJeffrey K. Eugenides
CWR 205Creative Writing (Literary Translation)(LA)Practice in the translation of literary works from another language into English supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by professionals and talented peers encourages the student's growth as both creator and reader of literature. Students MUST be fluent in their chosen language.Idra R. Novey
CWR 301Advanced Creative Writing (Poetry)(LA)Advanced practice in the original composition of poetry for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the places of literature among the liberal arts.Paul B. Muldoon
CWR 303Advanced Creative Writing (Fiction)(LA)Advanced practice in the original composition of fiction for discussion in regularly scheduled workshop meetings. The curriculum allows the student to develop writing skills, provides an introduction to the possibilities of contemporary literature and offers perspective on the place of literature among the liberal arts. Criticism by practicing writers and talented peers encourages the student's growth as both creator and reader of literature.Joyce Carol OatesEdmund V. WhiteA.M. Homes
CWR 305/COM 355Advanced Creative Writing (Literary Translation)(LA)Advanced practice in the translation of literary works from another language into English supplemented by the reading and analysis of standard works. Criticism by professionals and talented peers encourages the student's growth as both creator and reader of literature. Students MUST be fluent in their chosen language.Idra R. Novey
CWR 345Special Topics in Creative Writing: How to Write a Novel in Twelve Weeks (or at least make a start)(LA)This advanced workshop will be devoted to the novel. What makes a novel? How do novels work? Most important, how do we write one? Participants will arrive with a novel in prospect (in other words, an idea) or even a novel already in progress, will produce a minimum of eight draft pages per week, and will have their novels-in-progress workshopped by the group. In addition we will read at least three canonical novels of the past century to see what we can learn about why they succeed. Each participant's goal will be as much of a rough draft as possible of his or her novel-in-progress.Susan M. Choi
CWR 348/VIS 348Screenwriting I: Screenwriting as a Visual Medium(LA)The course will introduce students to basic screenwriting principals and techniques, using cross-cultural and cross-temporal examples. Course will examine the visual power of storytelling in film and other relative media, concentrating on the strategic use of visual elements to create a unified viewing experience and the use of visual moments/behavior in creating memorable characters. Students will complete the course with a strong working sense of the core elements used in visual storytelling as applied in film, tv, or new media. Final portfolio will include one silent short film and two narrative shorts.Christina Lazaridi
CWR 448/VIS 448Screenwriting II: Adaptation(LA)This course will introduce students to Screenwriting Adaptation techniques, focusing primarily on the challenges of adapting "true stories" pulled from various non-fiction sources. The class will address the ethics of adaptation, questions and techniques surrounding the need to fictionalize truth for dramatic purposes, as well as touching on the differences between fictional and nonfictional original materials. Students will be exposed to various contemporary non-fiction adaptations, and will write a short film (under 15 pages) and one longer project (30 pages).Christina Lazaridi
VIS 215/CWR 215Graphic Design: Typography(LA)This studio course introduces students to graphic design with a particular emphasis on typography. Students learn typographic history through lectures that highlight major shifts in print technologies and through their engagement in studio design projects. Class readings provide the raw material for hot metal typesetting in the letterpress print shop, photo-typesetting in the mechanical paste-up studio, and state of the art typesetting and design software in the digital computer lab. Overall, the workshop synthesizes hands-on graphic design skills with aesthetic awareness and a critical vocabulary.David W. Reinfurt
VIS 441/CWR 441/THR 441Notes on Color(LA)This seminar will explore the idea of color through a wide range of scientific, philosophical and aesthetic theories. While the eyes of normally sighted human beings render color in roughly the same manner, our reactions and ability to "see" color vary. Far from being a fixed entity, color is a deeply personal and psychological component of human perception and art. In addition to readings, presentations, and discussions, students will be required to keep two kinds of color diaries-one using portable watercolors and another using language-to chronicle their color perceptions, as well as write a paper on an artwork they encounter on campus.James Welling

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