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Reverse the Tide - New choreography by seniors
Katy Dammers and Stefanie Siller

 

Event Information

 

April 26, 2013 • 7:00

April 27, 2013 • 2:00 & 8:00

Patricia and Ward Hagan '48 Dance Studio

Lewis Center for the Arts
at 185 Nassau Street



Christina Campodonico ‘13 (foreground) and Adam Stasiw ‘13 rehearse “Sea Change,” Katy Dammer’s new dance work, to be presented at Reverse the Tide. Photo by Jaclyn Sweet

 

 

The Lewis Center for the Arts' Program in Dance presents Reverse the Tide, a performance of original choreography created by Katy Dammers and Stefanie Siller, seniors in the program, on Friday, April 26, at 7:00 p.m. and Saturday, April 27, at 2:00 and 8:00 p.m. in the Patricia and Ward Hagan '48 Dance Studio at 185 Nassau Street.  The performances are free and open to the public. 

The two new works to premiere are presented under the title, Reverse the Tide, with both pieces examining the interaction between forces of change and structure to question the process of evolution. The project is the culmination of their work in achieving a certificate in dance, a concentrated course of study in addition to their majors.

In “Sea Change,” Dammers notes her exploration of “the intersection between multiple art forms (music, art, and dance) and the inherent properties of dance itself.” She investigates the relationship between individuals and the group to examine how a community forms relationships and a sense of intimacy and how a community stabilizes itself after a disaster and comes together in times of need. In choreographing the dance Dammers, an art history major, notes she was inspired by water’s multiple properties and its ability to change states to rapidly shift from gentle waves to a turbulent storm. “In this piece,” she explains, “complex spatial patterns, unexpected alignments and intricate weaving motifs are used to represent the complicated relationships between groups of people.” 

“Sea Change” will be performed by dance students Tess Bernhard ’14, Casey Brown ’14, Christina Campodonico ’13, Toluwani Dawadu ’16, Carson Hughes ’16, and Adam Stasiw ’13. The piece is choreographed to three movements of Mozart’s Sonata in D Major for Two Pianos, which will be performed live by undergraduates Mariana Olaizola ’13 and Darya Koltunyuk ’15, both students in the Department of Music. Cara Michell ’15, a visual arts major, serves as artistic designer.

Siller, an anthropology major, describes her piece, “You Have but Slumbered Here,” as “a fusion of the aesthetic and the natural,” noting that she drew from a variety of sources that explore the cyclical nature of the environment, what it means to “conserve,” and how humankind can preserve and keep aspects of the environment constant without altering nature’s inherent tendency towards change. She also drew upon her experience as a conservation club teacher in Kenya last summer, where at a Community Conservation Day festival she witnessed primary school students in the program perform a traditional Maasai dance. “I was drawn to the way in which the dancers’ movements progressed and transformed while they fought to keep the movement grounded within the same innate characteristics,” she explains. She states that in her new piece a combination of organic movement and controlled randomness propel the dancers forward, while the use of paint roots the past visually on the dancers themselves. Siller was also inspired by the works of artist Andy Goldsworthy and the dance duo Eiko and Koma; Eiko visited Princeton last year as part of a lecture series in conjunction with the course “Muscle Memory” exploring the relationships between dance and sculpture.


Grace Singleton '16 (left) and Asawari Sodhi ’15 rehearse “You Have but Slumbered Here,” Stefanie Siller’s new dance work, to be presented at Reverse the Tide. Photo by Jaclyn Sweet

“You Have but Slumbered Here” is choreographed to three recorded original compositions by a senior chemical engineering student, Osei Wilks: “FusionPetals,” “Planters,” and “SnakeEyes.” The dance is performed by undergraduate and graduate students Rachel Buckle ’13, Lakshmi Davey ’15, Megan Karande ’13, Grace Singleton ’16, Asawari Sodhi ’15, and Hannah Yohalem G1.

The two seniors have worked together frequently during their time at Princeton, both choreographing new works and performing works by choreographers who have inspired their own work, such as Mark Morris, Trisha Brown and Rebecca Lazier. “Working together these past four years has generated a relationship of trust,” notes Dammers. “This has allowed us to push one another and explore our creative limits,” adds Siller.

To learn more about the Program in Dance and the more than 100 events offered annually by the Lewis Center visit princeton.edu/arts.

Link to photos:  https://lca.sharefile.com/d/sd2d5a73a7cc449ea
Photo Caption 1:  Christina Campodonico ‘13 (foreground) and Adam Stasiw ‘13 rehearse “Sea Change,” Katy Dammer’s new dance work, to be presented at Reverse the Tide.
Photo Caption 2: Grace Singleton '16 (left) and Asawari Sodhi ’15 rehearse “You Have but Slumbered Here,” Stefanie Siller’s new dance work, to be presented at Reverse the Tide.
Photo Credit: Photos by Jaclyn Sweet

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