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Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS)



 


Upcoming Event:

AALIMS-Princeton Conference on Islam and Human Capital - October 30-31, 2015 - Princeton University

This conference features a broad array of ongoing research on human capital in the Muslim world. Presentations will include papers on educational opportunities, the effects of education on attitudes, vocational and higher education, female schooling, and incentives for schooling. There will also be two panel discussions, one on “curriculum, ideology, and civic attitudes,” and the other on “gender and education.”

  

PAST AALIMS CONFERENCES

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AALIMS-Oxford Conference on Political Economy of Islam and Muslim Societies, May 15 and 16, 2015 - Oxford University

Co-sponsored by the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center and the PIIRS Workshop on Arab Political Development.

AALIMS - Spring 2014

Graduate Student Workshop

Friday, April 11, 2014

Princeton University, Princeton, NJ:

This workshop provided a forum for graduate students writing dissertations on Islam or the Muslim world. It featured selected students who presented work in progress to an audience consisting of both faculty and graduate students. The event also provided opportunities for graduate students in the field to meet one another as well as established scholars. AALIMS plans to organize graduate student workshops periodically at various locations. 

Presenters (partial list)

  • Cihan Artunc, Yale University: Legal Pluralism, Contracts and Trade in the Ottoman Empire
  • Diana Dakhlallah, Stanford University: The Micro-dynamics of Corruption in Morocco
  • Rachel Gillum, Stanford University: An Experimental Analysis of Muslim-American Attitudes toward US Law Enforcement
  • Michael Hoffman, Princeton Universit: Religion, Group Interest, and Democracy
  • Vera Mironova, University of Maryland, College Park: Leave, Stay, Fight: Different roles in Syria's Civil War

AALIMS - Spring 2014

Conference on the Political Economy of Muslim Societies

Friday, April 11 and Saturday, April 12, 2014

Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

All sessions are free and open to the public.

Schedule:

Presentations by faculty and advanced graduate students will explore the workings and transformations of diverse institutions that have been identified with Islam either through doctrinal interpretation or the practices of Muslims. The workshop's purpose is to foster conversations between scholars studying such institutions from various perspectives, in various contexts, and in both the past and the present. The focus will be on institutions that have affected political and economic performance.

http://aalims.org/

Conference sponsored by the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice, the Workshop on Arab Political Development (PIIRS), the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance, the Program in Near Eastern Studies, the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia and the Department of Near Eastern Studies.


Spring 2014 Conference Presenters


Mohamed Al-Ississ, American University in Cairo

Patronage and Electoral Behavior: Evidence from Egypt's First Presidential Elections

 

Tahir Andrabi, Pomona College

Gender Attitudes of Pakistani Parents: Rates of Return or Religious Values

Aysegul Aydin, University of Colorado, Boulder and Cem Emrence

18 Districts: The Making of Mass Kurdish Nationalism

 

John Bowen, Washington University in St. Louis

Fiqh, law and morality in Aceh, Indonesia

 

Filipe Campante, Harvard Kennedy School and David Yanagizawa-Drott, Harvard Kennedy School

Does Religion Affect Economic Growth and Happiness? Evidence from Ramadan

Eric Chaney, Harvard University

Pirates of the Mediterranean: An Empirical Investigation of Bargaining with Transaction Costs

 

Amaney Jamal, Princeton University, Tarek Masoud, Harvard Kennedy School and Elizabeth Nugent, Princeton University

Discursive Frames and Policy Preferences in the Muslim world  --  When Does Religion Resonate? Experimental Evidence from Egypt

 

Saumitra Jha, Stanford University

Unfinished Business: Ethnic Complementarities and the Political Contagion of Conflict and Peace in Gujarat

Asim Khwaja, Harvard Kennedy School

Trust in State Authority and Non-State Actors: Evidence from Pakistan

Adria Lawrence, Yale University

Collective Protest and the Institutional Promise of Monarchy

 

Jennifer London, Institute for Advanced Study

Richard Nielsen, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Martyrdom or Irrelevance?  The Effect of Drone Strikes on the Intellectual Legacy of Jihadists

Jennifer Peck, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Can Hiring Quotas Work? The Effect of the Nitaqat Program on the Saudi Private Sector

 

Jacob Shapiro, Princeton University

With Ali Cheema, Lahore University of Management Sciences, Asim Khwaja, Harvard Kennedy School and Farooq Naseer, Lahore University of Management Sciences:

Do Good Intentions Matter? Experimental evidence on how citizens respond to promises of Government service delivery

 

Yael Zeira, University of Mississippi

Protesting Together: Education and Participation in Nationalist Resistance in Palestine

AALIMS Brochure pg 2 small
AALIMS Brochure pg 1 small

 

 

 

Fall 2013 Workshop and Conference

Friday - Saturday October 18 and 19, 2013

Princeton University

Princeton, New Jersey

http://aalims.org/

Friday - Saturday October 18 and 19, 2013

Princeton University

Princeton, New Jersey

http://aalims.org/

 
Presentations by faculty and advanced graduate students will explore the workings and transformations of diverse institutions that have been identified with Islam either through doctrinal interpretation or the practices of Muslims. The workshop's purpose is to foster conversations between scholars studying such institutions from various perspectives, in various contexts, and in both the past and the present. The focus will be on institutions that have affected political and economic performance.

Presenters:

Masooda Bano, University Research Lecturer
Department of International Development, University of Oxford
Emergence of Female Preachers and Shaping of Islamic Authority: Case of Institutional Change or Persistence?


Christine Binzel, Postdoc
Department of Economics, University of Heidelberg

Jean-Paul Carvalho, Assistant Professor
Department of Economics, University of California-Irvine

Education, Social Mobility and Religious Movements: A Theory of the Islamic Revival in Egypt


Lisa Blaydes, Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science, Stanford University
Mirrors for Princes and Sultans: The Evolution of Governance in the Medieval Christian and Islamic Worlds

(with Justin Grimmer, Stanford University and Alison McQueen, Stanford University)


Stuart Borsch, Assistant Professor
Department of History, Assumption College
Coercion and Catastrophe: the Black Death in Comparative Perspective


Metin Cosgel, Professor

Economics Department, University of Connecticut

Theocracy  (with Thomas Miceli, University of Connecticut)


Amaney Jamal, Associate Professor
Department of Politics, Princeton University

Tarek Masoud, Associate Professor
John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

Elizabeth Nugent, PhD Candidate
Department of Politics, Princeton University

Discursive frames and policy preferences in the Muslim world  --  When does religion resonate? Experimental evidence from Egypt


Jane Menon, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Political Science, University of Michigan
Women’s Activism in Islamist Organizations: How Co-education Shapes Mobilization for Gender Equality


Erik Meyersson, Assistant Professor
SITE, Stockholm School of Economics
Counting Islamists – Regression Discontinuity meets Election Forensics


Alan Mikhail, Professor
Department of History, Yale University
Engineering Institutions: Irrigation and the Persistence of Early Modern Expertise in Ottoman Egypt


Christopher Paik, Assistant Professor
Department of Politics, New York University-Abu Dhabi
A Western Reversal Since the Neolithic? The Long-Run Impact of Early Agriculture

With Ola Olsson, University of Gothenburg


 Thomas Pepinsky, Assistant Professor
Department of Government, Cornell University
Colonial Migration and the Origins of Governance: Theory and Evidence from Java


Carolyn Warner, Professor
School of Politics and Global Studies, Arizona State University

Generosity Dynamics of Catholicism and Islam: The Role of Institutions and Beliefs

(with Ramazan Kilinc, University of Nebraska, Omaha and Christopher Hale, Arizona State University)


The workshop is organized jointly by the the Association for Analytic Learning about Islam and Muslim Societies (AALIMS) and three Princeton University units: theMamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice, the Workshop on Arab Political Development (an affiliate of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies and the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance. It also has the following co-sponsors: the Program in Near Eastern Studies, the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa and Central Asiaand the Department of Near Eastern Studies. The event is the first focused workshop co-organized by AALIMS. The first AALIMS conference took place at Duke University in 2010, the second at Harvard University in 2011, and the third at Stanford University in 2012. The fourth was held at Rice University in April 2013.

Questions may be directed to bobstctr@princeton.edu


Spring 2014 Annual Conference Organizing Committee

Amaney Jamal, Princeton University, chair

Tahir Andrabi, Pomona College

Timur Kuran, Duke University

Helen Milner, Princeton University

Thomas Pepinsky, Cornell University

Jacob Shapiro, Princeton University