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Events, Spring 2014

The Minefields of Mediation Workshop
May 8-9, 2014 
sponsored by the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and the University of Oslo, Norway
May 8
9:15 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
101 and 105 Bobst Hall
May 9
9:15 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
101 and 105 Bobst Hall 
   


 

IR Faculty Colloquium - A. Jamal, R. Keohane, D. Romney and D. Tingley - May 5

Amaney Jamal (Princeton University), Robert O. Keohane (Princeton University), David Romney(Harvard University) and Dustin Tingley (Harvard University) will be the guest speakers at the International Relations Faculty Colloquium session, the last for the 2014 academic year.

Monday, May 5th  at 12:15pm in Room 219, Aaron Burr Hall.

 

 
 

April 24, 2014: Panel discussion

Up to the Minute: Middle East Peace Talks: Crisis or Opportunity?

4:30 p.m.
Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall
 
Amaney Jamal; Daniel C. Kurtzer; and Rami Khouri
 

 
 

April 11-12, 2014

AALIMS Workshop and Conference

Find details here:  http://www.princeton.edu/bobst/events/aalims/

 

 
 

April 8

Workshop on Race, Ethnicity and Identity

LAFLEUR STEPHENS

Race-ing for Votes: How Political Elites Use Racial Appeals to Win Votes

5:00 p.m.
105 Bobst Hall
 

 
 

March 26

"The Security Archipelago: Human-Security States, Sexuality Politics and Social Militarization in Contemporary Egypt and Brazil "

Paul Amar, Global and International Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara
March 26
12 noon
Location: 105 Bobst Hall
 

 
 

March 25

Islam in Conversation Series

"Islamic Law, Gender and Human Rights"

Dr. Khaled Abou el Fadl, UCLA School of Law
 
Co-sponsored by the Program in Law and Public Affairs and Near Eastern Studies.
 
March 25
6:30 p.m.
101 McCormick Hall
Princeton University Art Museum
 
  

 
 

March 25

"Measuring Public Opinion During Egypt's Struggle to Democracy"

Magued Osman, Egyptian Center for Public Opinion "Baseera"
March 25
4:30 p.m.
Bowl 001, Robertson Hall
 

 
 

March 10

"Policy Deliberation and Voting Behavior: A Campaign Experiment in the Philippines"

A symposium by Gabriel Lopez Moctezuma Jassan and Leonard Wantchekon

11:30 a.m. -- 1:30 p.m; Rooms 101 and 105, Bobst Hall

 

 
 

Workshop on Arab Political Development

"Revolutions, Counter-Revolutions and Constitutions: The Difficult Rebirth of the Modern Arab World"

Rami Khouri, Issam Fares Institute for Public Policy and International Affairs, American University of Beirut
March 5
4:30 p.m.
Location: Bowl 1, Robertson Hall
 

 
 

Workshop on Arab Political Development

"After the Arab Spring"

Marc Lynch, George Washington University
February 25
4:30 p.m.
Bowl 001, Robertson Hall
 
 

 
 

February 11

Workshop on Race, Ethnicity and Identity
Princeton University
5:00 p.m.
105 Bobst Hall
 

 
 
 

Events, Fall 2013

Mandela: Man, Myth and Memory

Dec. 11, 2013

5:00 p.m.

219 Aaron Burr Hall

December 10

Nancy Okail, Executive Director, Tahir Institute for Middle East Policy (TIMEP)
“Does the US Still Have Leverage Over Egyptian Transition?”
4:30 p.m.
Bowl 1
Robertson Hall
  

 
 
 
November 8

Workshop on Arab Political Development Co-sponsored event

"Institutional Reform in Pakistan: Approach and Challenges"

Bobst-WWS Innovations for Successful Societies talk, Ahsan Iqbal, Fri., Nov. 8, Robertson Rm. 16

On Friday, November 8, Ahsan Iqbal, Minister of Planning and Development for Pakistan, will visit the Bobst-WWS Innovations for Successful Societies program.  The Minister formed a dynamic Institutional Reform Group in Punjab, and he will talk about this program as well as other initiatives underway. The talk will take place in Bowl 16, Robertson Hall.

 

 
 
 
October 22
Workshop on Race, Ethnicity and Identity:
Paul Frymer, Princeton University
5:00 p.m.
105 Bobst Hall
  

 
 

October 18 and 19

AALIMS ConferenceEconomic and Political Institutions of Islam:  Past and Present
Bowl 016
Robertson Hall
  

 
 

October 14

"Interim Assessment:  Is There Progress Toward Democracy in the Post-Spring Arab World? "
Leslie Campbell, National Democratic Institute
4:30  p.m.
McCosh 60
  

 
 

Oct. 14, 2013

Qasim Rashid, "The Wrong Kind of Muslim"

7:00 p.m.

Dodds Auditorium

Lecture by Qasim Rashid with opening remarks by Professor Robert George, Chairman, US Commission on International Religious Freedom.

Presented by the Freedom, Human Rights and The Muslim World Initiative and the Muslim Life Program of the Princeton University Office of Religious Life.  Co-sponsored by the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice.

 

 
 

October 8 

"What is Happening in Egypt"
Dalia Ziada, Ibn Khaldun Center for Development Studies
12:00  p.m.
Bowl 002, Robertson Hall
 
  

 
 
October 7
"A New U.S.-Middle East Approach Towards the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict" 
Maen Rashid AreikatAmbassador of the PLO Delegation to the US
4:30 p.m.
Dodds Auditorium
Robertson Hall
  

 
 

October 4 and 5

 

Aaron Burr Hall, Room 219

 

 
 

September 26

South Asian Studies Seminar
Sankarshan Thakur, Roving Editor, The Telegraph (New Delhi)
"Narendra Modi and the 2014 India Elections"
12:00 p.m.
Aaron Burr Hall, Room 219
  

 
 

September 26

Public Lecture with 

His Excellency, Moncef Marzouki, President of the Republic of Tunisia

Co-sponsored by the Workshop on Arab Political Development and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

5:00 p.m.

Richardson Auditorium

 

 
 

September 25

Sankarshan Thakur, Roving Editor, The Telegraph (New Delhi)
"Caste and Sectarianism: Constructive and Destructive Narratives of Affirmative Action"
4:30 p.m.
Bowl 1, Robertson Hall
 

 
 

 

Events, Spring 2013

Grant Proposal Professional Development Workshop for Politics Graduate Students with Professors Mark Beissinger, Kosuke Imai, Jake Shapiro; Politics Grants Manager Bobbie Zlotnik; and ORPA's Electronic Research Coordinator Kyle Burkhardt.
Tuesday January 8, 2013, 12 - 2:30 p.m., Location: Corwin 127
Lunch will be served.  POL Graduate Students and Faculty Only.
Co-sponsored by the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and the Politics Department Graduate Office

Film Screening of Promises: A Hope for Peace in the Children of Israel and Palestine with Director Justine Shapiro

Monday December 10, 6:30-8:30 pm, Location: Whig Hall, Senate Chamber

Wednesday February 6, 4:30 p.m., 127 Corwin Hall
Comparative Politics Colloquium

More People = More Democracy
John Gerring, Boston University

Tuesday February 12, 4:30 p.m., Dodds Auditorium
How Not to Write a Constitution: Lessons from Egypt
Marina Ottaway, Senior Scholar, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
Dodds Auditorium
Cosponsored by the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice; the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia; the Department of and Program in Near Eastern Studies, and the
 Workshop on Arab Political Development.

Wednesday February 20, 4:30 p.m., 216 Aaron Burr Hall
Democracy and Development Workshop
Why Nations Fail
James Robinson, Harvard University

Friday February 22, 10 a.m., Bobst Hall (83 Prospect Avenue) Room 101
Book Discussion 
Ways Out of War: Peacemakers in the Middle East and Balkans, edited by Mona Fixdal, Department of History, University of Oslo

Ambassador Peter Galbraith, Former Ambassador to Croatia

Ambassador Daniel Kurtzer, Former Ambassador to Israel and Egypt and Woodrow Wilson School Lecturer and S. Daniel Abraham Visiting Professor in Middle East Policy Studies

Ambassador Samuel Lewis, Former Ambassador to Israel, Former Director of Policy Planning Staff and past President and CEO of the United States Institute of Peace

Professor Brendan O'Leary, Lauder Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania

The Honorable Harold Saunders ‘52, Former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs and current Director of International Affairs, Kettering Foundation

The Honorable Tamara Cofman Wittes, Former U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs and current Director, Saban Center for Middle East Policy, Brookings Institution

How do peacemakers end wars? This book explores the work of ten diplomats who were charged with negotiating conclusions to intractable conflicts in the Middle East and Balkans. The first study to combine the outlooks of practitioners and academics, Ways out of War shows how peacemaking has struggled to respond to new forms of war, especially asymmetrical warfare between state and non-state actors. It shows these diplomats straining to solve major challenges, such as negotiating with war criminals, balancing peace against justice, handling spoilers, setting the timing of peace initiatives, and building or rebuilding state structures. By focusing on these questions from individual peacemakers' points of view, Ways out of War paints a vivid picture of peacemaking, one with full scope for the play of personalities—but one, too, that is critical, comparative, and fully informed by theoretical literature. It makes compelling and essential reading for all students of negotiation and conflict resolution, as well as for any reader who takes an interest in the Balkans, the Middle East, or the ten notable diplomats at its heart.  Sponsored by Innovations for Successful Societies and the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice
 

Friday February 22, 12 p.m., Aaron Burr Hall Room 216
PIIRS Director's Book Forum 
Of Empires and Citizens: Pro-American Democracy or No Democracy at All? (Princeton Univeristy Press, 2012)
Amaney Jamal, Associate Professor of Politics, Director of the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and of the Workshop on Arab Political Development
Lunch will be provided.

Wednesday February 27, 4:30 p.m., 127 Corwin Hall
Comparative Politics Colloquium
Daniela Campello, Princeton University

Wednesday, March 6, 127 Corwin Hall

Comparative Politics Colloquium
Paul Sniderman, Stanford University

M. Hakan Yavuz, Professor of Political Science, University of Utah
Toward an Islamic Enlightenment: The Gülen Movement
Thursday March 7, 2013, 4:30 p.m.

Bobst Hall (83 Prospect Avenue) Room 101

**Attendees should read the book before the seminar discussion; no presentation will be given. Contact Kevin Mazur (kmazur@princeton.edu) or Sarah Kazaz (skazaz@princteton.edu) for more information.
 

 

A Panel Discussion with Ambassador Daniel Kurtzer, Lecturer in Public and International Affairs and S. Daniel Abraham Visiting Professor in Middle East Policy Studies and Yael Berda, Israeli Constitutional Lawyer and PhD Candidate in Sociology.  Moderated by Professor Amaney Jamal

Monday March 11, 4:30 p.m., Location: Robertson Hall Dodds Auditorium

Sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson School, Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and the Workshop on Arab Political Development


Thursday March 14, 2013, 12 p.m., 219 Aaron Burr Hall
Pakistan: Preventing State Failure
Pervex Hoodbhoy, Pakistani nuclear physicist, essayist, and defense analyst
Co-Sponsored with the Program in South Asian Studies (PIIRS)


Thursday March 14, 2013, 4:30 p.m., Bowl 016

Alexander Aleinikoff, United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Refugees 
The International Refugee Regime: Protection without Solutions?
Co-Sponsored with the WWS Office of Public Affairs


Wendy Pearlman, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Northwestern University

Violence, Nonviolence and the Palestinian National Movement.

Tuesday March 26, 4:30 p.m.

Bobst Hall (83 Prospect Avenue) Room 101

Attendees should read the book before the seminar discussion; no presentation will be given. Contact Kevin Mazur (kmazur@princeton.edu) or Sarah Kazaz (skazaz@princteton.edu) for more information.


Wednesday, March 27, 4:30 p.m., 216 Aaron Burr Hall
Democracy and Development Workshop
The Politics of Improving Cabinet Office Performance
Jennifer Widner, Princeton University


Wednesday March 27, 4:30 p.m.
McCormick Hall 101 (near Art Museum)

Dr. Eric Davis is a Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University and past director of the University's Center for Middle Eastern Studies. His research has included the study of the relationship between state power and historical memory in modern Iraq, the political economy of Egyptian industrialization, the ideology and social bases of religious radical movements in Egypt and Israel, and the impact of oil wealth on the state and culture in Arab oil-producing countries. Sponsored by the Princeton Middle East Society, the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and the Workshop on Arab Political Development (PIIRS).


Wednesday, April 10, 4:30 p.m., 127 Corwin Hall
Comparative Politics Colloquium
Scott Straus, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Wednesday, April 17, 4:30 p.m., 216 Aaron Burr Hall
Democracy and Development Workshop
Responsiveness and Responsibility: Party-Voter Linkages in Argentina and Chile
Maria Victoria Murillo, Columbia University


 
Wednesday April 24, 12 p.m.

Comparative Politics Colloquium (co-sponsored with the European Union Program)
Interwar Fascism and the Origins of the Contemporary Radical Right in Sweden
Kare Vernby - Uppsala University 

Wednesday April 24, 7 p.m., 101 McCormick Hall

Remembering Virginia Tech: The Fight for a Safer America

Colin Goddard, a survivor of the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting and Assistant Director, Brady Campaign to End Gun Violence, will visit Princeton to give a public talk about gun violence and how he thinks gun laws can play a stronger role in creating a safer America. The event will include a screening of the film “Living for 32” – a powerful documentary about the Virginia Tech shooting, and closing remarks from Colin.

This event is co-sponsored by S.A.V.E. (the Student Anti-Violence Effort), NJ Million Mom March, College Democrats, and the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice.


Ziad Fahmy, Assistant Professor of Modern Middle East History, Cornell University

Ordinary Egyptians: Creating the Modern Nation through Popular Culture

Thursday April 25, 4:30 p.m.

Bobst Hall (83 Prospect Avenue) Room 101

Attendees should read the book before the seminar discussion; no presentation will be given. Contact Kevin Mazur (kmazur@princeton.edu) or Sarah Kazaz (skazaz@princteton.edu) for more information.


Ideology and Humor in Dark Times: Notes from Syria
April 30, 4:30 P.M.– 6:30 P.M., Robertson Hall Bowl 02
Workshop on Arab Political Development
Lisa Wedeen, University of Chicago

Co-sponsored by Workshop on Arab Political Development, the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice, and the Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. 

Wednesday, May 1, 4:30 p.m., 216 Aaron Burr Hall
Democracy and Development Workshop
Social Democracy and Democratic Consolidation in Europe
Sheri Berman, Barnard College
 

Thursday May 9, 4:30 p.m., Aaron Burr Hall Room 219

Saskia Sassen is the Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology and Co-Chair, The Committee on Global Thought, Columbia University (www.saskiasassen.com). Her recent books are Territory, Authority, Rights: From Medieval to Global Assemblages ( Princeton University Press 2008), A Sociology of Globalization (W.W.Norton 2007), and the 4th fully updated edition of Cities in a World Economy(Sage 2012). Among older books is The Global City Princeton University Press 1991/2001). Her books are translated into over 20 languages. Currently she is working on Ungoverned Territories(Harvard University Press). She is the recipient of diverse awards and mentions, ranging from multiple doctor honoris causa to named lectures and being selected as one of the 100 Top Global Thinkers of 2011 by Foreign Policy Magazine. 

Sponsors: Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, The Institute for Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia, and the Workshop on Arab Political Development (PIIRS)

Events, Fall 2012

 

Experimental Research Workshop, cosponsored with the Niehaus Center for Globalization and GovernanceCenter for the Study of Democratic Politics, and The Program for Quantitative and Analytical Political Science (Q-APS)

Friday September 28 - Saturday September 29, 2012
Robertson Hall Bowl 016


Workshop on Arab Political Development
Bernard Haykel, Department of Near Eastern Studies and director, Institute for Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia

"Is Yemen a Failed State?"

Tuesday October 2, 2012, 4:30 p.m., Location: Robertson Hall Bowl 2


Panel Discussion: Digital Pathways to Peace? Online Dialogues in the Middle East

Monday October 15, 4:30 p.m., Robertson Hall (WWS) Bowl 16

Can virtual communities forge bonds of trust and understanding among groups separated by political boundaries and cultural conflict?  YaLa-Young Leaders is an online, Facebook-based movement dedicated to empowering young Middle Easterners to lead their generation to a better future.  A 2011New York Times article characterized YaLa’s early success as “suggesting that the Facebook-driven revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt may offer guidance of coexistence efforts as well.”  Members of YaLa will join leading scholars for a discussion of whether and how online initiatives can help to build civic networks and institutions that will provide a foundation for peace.


Moty Cristal

Peace Negotiator & CEO, Negotiation Strategies LTD 

Mahdee Jaber Abu-Zehriya & Megan Hallahan
Ya-La–Young Leaders

Mitchell Duneier
Maurice P. During Professor of Sociology, Princeton University

Amaney Jamal
Professor of Politics and the Director of the Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice, Princeton University 

Christopher L. Eisgruber
 (moderator)
Provost, Princeton University

Sponsored by:  

Office of Religious Life
Program in Law and Public Affairs
Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice
Woodrow Wilson School     


Latinos in the 2012 Elections: An Expert Discussion on Research and Politics
Thursday October 25, 2012, 4:30 p.m., Robertson Hall Bowl 016

Marisa Abrajano, Department of Political Science, University of California~San Diego
Daniel Hopkins, Department of Government, Georgetown University
Gary Segura, Department of Political Science and Chair, Program in Chicana/o Studies, Stanford University

Panel moderated by Ali Valenzuela, Department of Politics, Princeton University

Political scientists will give their expert analysis of the 2012 Election and the role of Latinos in local or national races this November and beyond.  Panelists will be asked to discuss their particular research expertise so that we might better understand some aspect of the election dynamic that is not typically discussed in the mainstream media.

Co-sponsored by the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice, the Program in Latino Studies and the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics

Free and Open to the Public

Workshop on Arab Political Development
Kahlil Shikaki, Palestinian Center for Policy and Survey Research
Daniel Kurtzer, WWS
Amaney Jamal, Politics; Director, Workshop on Arab Political Development; Director, Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice

"U.S. Election Outcome and Its Impact on the Palestinian-Israeli Peace Plan"
November 15, 2012, 4:30 p.m., Location: Robertson Hall Bowl 2


Film Screening of Jai Bhim Comrade with Anand Patwardhan, leading Indian documentary film maker
Thursday December 6, 6 p.m., Location: Aaron Burr Hall 219 

Co-sponsored by the Program in South Asian Studies (PIIRS) and the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice

Events, Fall 2011

Thursday September 22, 2011, 4:30 p.m., Corwin 127

The Art of Writing a Politics Research Proposal workshop, sponsored by the Bobst Center and the Department of Politics Graduate Program, will offer interested faculty and graduate students insights into the availability of research grants, guidance on crafting a research proposal and useful tips for a successful statement of work.

Professors Evan Lieberman, Associate Chair of Politics, Mark Beissinger, Director of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, and Kosuke Imai, and Politics Grants Manager Bobbie Zlotnik to present.


Public Event: Wednesday October 19, 2011, 4:30 p.m., Bobst 105

Emil P. Bolongaita, Public Management Specialist, Asian Development Bank 

A Revolution in Fighting Corruption?  A Comparative Analysis of Indonesia's Anti-Corruption Agency

 


Thursday, October 20, 2011, 9:00 a.m., Location: Bobst 101

Roundtable discussion with Matt Andrews, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard

Reform Leaders: Who are they and what do they do?
 


Thursday, October 20, 2011, 12 noon (Lunch served), Location: Robertson 035

Kurt Weyland, Department of Government, University of Texas at Austin

Policy diffusion: The State of the Academic Conversation


Events, Spring 2011


World Development Report 2011: Conflict, Security, and Development

Wednesday April 13, 4:30 p.m.

Robertson Hall (WWS) Bowl 01

A conversation with Nigel Roberts, Special Representative and WDR Director, and Gary Milante, WDR Research Economist


Building peaceful nation-states which respond to the aspirations of their citizens takes strong leadership, both international and domestic. The international community has an important role to play in assisting countries to avoid, contain and recover from conflict, and the recent past demonstrates how much can be achieved when global and national incentives align, and program implementation is appropriately designed and well-managed. Too often, though, efforts have failed to decisively address the motives and opportunities which help to mobilize violent conflict; to integrate political, security and development approaches; or to align local, national, regional and global actions. As a result, some areas have seen new waves of conflict and violence in recent years and some “post-conflict countries” have not yet managed to make a decisive shift to successful and stable development.  

Nigel Roberts has worked in international development for over 30 years, spending much of this time in the field. He was based for extended periods in Malawi, Thailand, Hong Kong, Nepal, Kenya, Ethiopia and Jerusalem, as well as working on the Pacific out of Australia. Since 1968 he worked for various development NGOs, including Oxfam and Save the Children Fund. Nigel joined the World Bank in 1981 as an agricultural economist, and before co-leading the WDR team was for almost 20 years a field-based Country Manager (Nepal, Ethiopia) and then Country Director (West Bank & Gaza, the Pacific).  

Gary Milante came to the World Bank in 2003 as a researcher, focusing on the causes and impacts of conflict and fragility as well as on effective post-conflict recovery. His interests are in applied game theory and modeling the political economy of peaceful compromise. Before joining the WDR 2011 team, Gary held a joint position in the Development Economics Research Group and the Bank’s Fragile and Conflict Affected Countries Group. He led the Bank’s "Peace and Development" research project focusing on successful post-conflict economic recovery through effective powersharing arrangements, political systems and macroeconomic policy. He has conducted research in Sudan and has recently written on the upcoming referendum. Additionally, he manages research projects on landmines and geography of conflict data, has written on the "Arab Democracy Deficit" and was a guest editor for a special edition on post-conflict transitions for the Journal of Peace Research. Gary has taught the World Bank's core course on fragility and conflict for internal and external audiences and leads the "Carana" post-conflict recovery simulation exercise for the course.

Sponsored by the Innovations for Successful Societies (ISS) Program, a joint initiative of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice


Conflict Resolution: The Role of Business in Dismantling Apartheid


Monday February 14, 2011, 4:30 p.m.

Michael Young, business executive and mediator who brokered the secret talks that led to the end of apartheid in South Africa, will present a public talk titled, "Conflict Resolution: The Role of Business in Dismantling Apartheid" at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, February 14, in Bowl 016, Robertson Hall.

This event is co-sponsored by the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.


Events, Fall 2010

Building Institutions in Fragile States



October 8, 2010

8:45 AM – 4:00 PM


Robertson Hall (WWS) Bowl 16

 
TENTATIVE SCHEDULE
 

8:15 a.m. – Breakfast

8:45 a.m. – Introduction

Jennifer Widner, Professor of International Affairs and Politics and Director, Mamdouha S. Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and Innovations for Successful Societies Program

 

9:00 a.m. - Reform Leadership and Institutional Change
Ronald MacLean-Abaroa, Leadership and Coalition Building Program, World Bank Institute and former mayor of La Paz, Bolivia with comments by Robert Tignor, Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, Emeritus

10:45 a.m. - Making Services Work: Mobilizing Social Pressures and Information
Sven de Kock and Martin Wust, FeverTree Consulting, South Africa

12 p.m. - Lunch

1:00 p.m. - Decentralization in Insecure Environments
ISS Introduction

Jean-Paul Faguet, London School of Economics and Joseph Stiglitz’s Decentralization Team, Initiative for Policy Dialogue, Columbia University

2:45 p.m. - Cities as Centers of Change
Videoconference with Antanas Mockus, former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia and candidate in the 2010 presidential elections




Case Study Research Workshop

Thursday and Friday, September 23 and 24, 2010

Case studies are an important tool in research on effective peace agreements, international negotiation, and institution building.  Scholars use qualitative cases to evolve theories, identify causal mechanisms, and trace processes.  Sometimes they use them to text explanations.  What makes some case studies better than others for these purposes?  What kinds of steps should researchers take to ensure that others can replicate their work and understand the degree of uncertainty surrounding their conclusions?
 
Thursday, September 23
4:30-6 p.m., Aaron Burr Hall, Room 219       
“Cases and Theory Building/Cases and Causal Inference: Current Debates” 
Andrew Bennett (Georgetown University), with comments by Carles Boix (Princeton University) and Robert Keohane (Princeton University)
 
6:15-8 p.m., Bobst Hall, 83 Prospect Avenue         
Reception & dinner  
 
Friday, September 24
9:00 a.m., Robertson Hall, Bowl 016          
“Case Studies & Policy Analysis: Reflections on a National Academy of Sciences Study” 
Jack Goldstone (George Mason University), with comments by Andrew Bennett (Georgetown University)
 
10:30 a.m., Robertson Hall, Bowl 016
Case Study Methods to Study Institution Building and Institutional Change:  Opportunities & Limits
  •  “Analyzing Institutional Change in Fragile States”  
    Jennifer Widner (Princeton University)

12 p.m., Bobst Hall, 83 Prospect Avenue

1:00 p.m., Bobst Hall, Room 105
Panel Discussion: Replicability in Qualitative Research
  • A Modest Proposal?:
    Colin Elman (Syracuse University) and Andrew Moravscik (Princeton University)
  •  “Historically-oriented Replication Datasets” 
    Evan Lieberman (Princeton University)
2:30 p.m., Bobst Hall, Room 105
Wrap-Up Comments
Andrew Bennett (Georgetown University), Jack Goldstone (George Mason University), Colin Elman (Syracuse University), Robert Keohane (Princeton University)
 
Please register by emailing Maureen Killeen at mkilleen@princeton.edu or calling
609-258-8237.

Co-Sponsored Comparative Politics Colloquium in AY 2010-2011

Thursday, October 7, 4:30 p.m., 105 Bobst Hall, 83 Prospect Avenue
Sarah Zukerman, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
“Bankruptcy, Guns or Campaigns:  Explaining Armed Groups’ Post-War Trajectories”  

Thursday, November 11, 4:30 p.m., 105 Bobst Hall, 83 Prospect Avenue 
Saumitra Jha, Stanford University 
“Veterans, Organizational Skill and Ethnic Cleansing: Evidence from the Partition of South Asia” (with Steven Wilkinson)  

Thursday, December 2, 4:30 p.m., 105 Bobst Hall, 83 Prospect Avenue
Karen Barkey, Columbia University
“State Formation in the Ottoman Empire, A Dialogue with Reflections on Contemporary State Building Strategies”   

Co-sponsored by the Bobst Center for Peace and Justice and the Research Program in International Security (RSIP).  The complete Comparative Politics Colloquia schedule can be viewed here.