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Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Deputy Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, will deliver an on-campus lecture on February 19 entitled “Ubiquitous Electronics through Conducting Plastics” as part of the President’s Lecture Series.  Established by President Shirley Tilghman in 2001, the three President’s Lectures each year give Princeton’s faculty an opportunity to learn about the work of their
Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Deputy Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, was recently named a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS).  Each year, newly-elected APS Fellows number no more than ½% of APS membership.  Loo, who was recommended for Fellowship by the APS Division of Polymer Physics (DPOLY), was recognized “for elucidating the relationships between structure and function in conducting
In organic photovoltaic devices, the active layer—which absorbs sunlight to generate the electrons and holes which become the output current—has a delicate balancing act.  It must simultaneously be thin enough that the electrons and holes can easily be collected, yet thick enough to absorb much of the solar radiation landing upon it.  In an article entitled, “Wrinkles and Deep Folds as Photonic Structures in Photovoltaics”, published recently in Nature Photonics
In single crystals of organic semiconductors, charge carrier mobility can depend strongly on the crystal orientation, since mobility is typically much higher along the pi-stacking direction.  But usually, the active layer in organic transistors consists not of a single crystal, but of a polycrystalline aggregate.  CBE graduate student Stephanie Lee, working with Professor Yueh-Lin Loo and collaborators from the University of Kentucky, has studied large two-dimensional spherulites&mdash
Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Deputy Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, has been chosen to receive the 2012 Owens Corning Early Career Award from the Materials Engineering and Sciences Division (MESD) of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).  The award “recognizes outstanding independent contributions to the scientific, technological, educational or service areas of materials science and engineer
A multi-institutional international research team led by Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and Takao Someya of the University of Tokyo (also in part-time residence at Princeton since 2009 as a Princeton Global Scholar) has created an organic transistor whose electronic characteristics are unchanged even after 20 sec of heating at 150°C, a temperature typically used to sterilize medical devices.  These transistors, fabricated on a thin plastic film, a
The World Economic Forum has announced its Young Global Leaders (YGLs) for 2012, including Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Deputy Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.  This honor, bestowed each year by the Forum, recognizes up to 200 outstanding young leaders from around the world for their professional accomplishments, commitment to society, and potential to contribute to shaping the future of the world.  For 2012,
Lynn Loo, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, has been appointed the first Deputy Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment (ACEE), effective July 1. As Deputy Director, Loo will develop programs that enrich the education and professional experiences of graduate students and post-doctoral researchers and will help build external partnerships for the ACEE. For more information, see the ACEE news release.
In their meeting concluded this past weekend, the Trustees of Princeton University have approved the promotions of Associate Professors Yueh-Lin Loo and Stanislav Shvartsman to full Professor, effective July 1, 2011. Congratulations to both Lynn and Stas!
Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and her work were highlighted at the “Celebrate Princeton Invention” event held on the University’s campus on December 3. The event, which brought together members of the University community, investors, and industry representatives, featured eight kiosks at which University researchers presented their discoveries, including Loo’s work on printable conductive plastics for low-cost solar panel
Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Associate Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, was one of five young scientists who spoke in September at the World Economic Forum’s (WEF’s) "Annual Meeting of the New Champions" in Tianjin, China. To present her group’s research on plastic electronics to the broad audience attending the WEF, the School of Engineering and Applied Science produced a short video demonstrating just a few of the possibilities that these novel materials an
A research team led by Yueh-Lin Loo, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and an associated faculty member in Electrical Engineering, has shows that a simple treatment can raise the conductivity of polyaniline and poly(ethylene dioxythiophene), PANI and PEDOT, by 2-3 orders of magnitude.
The channel region of solution-processed organic thin film transistors using triethylsilylethynyl anthradithiophene (TES-ADT)as the organic semiconductor. Grain size is controlled by the addition of fluorinated-TES-ADT, which acts as heterogeneous nuclei for TES-ADT crystallization.
Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, has been named as the recipient of the 2010 John H. Dillon Medal of the American Physical Society (APS).
Chemical engineering graduate student Stephanie Lee and postdoctoral associate Chang Su Kim, working with Professor Lynn Loo and collaborators from the University of Kentucky and Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, have discovered a method to tune the grain size of organic semiconductors over a remarkable three orders of magnitude.
Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, has been selected to receive one of eight research awards in environmental chemistry from the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation.
The July issue of the MRS Bulletin, edited by Lynn Loo of Princeton and Iain McCulloch of Imperial College, is devoted to "Commercialization of Organic Electronics". Featuring six highlight articles by leaders in the field, and a tutorial article by the editors, this issue focuses on recent technological advances in organic electronics and light-emitting devices as well as photovoltaics and sensors.
This is a top-view of a thin-film transistor, the basic building block for integrated circuits. The source and drain interdigitated electrodes of this transistor consist of a conductive polymer, polyaniline, that is directly patternable from an aqueous dispersion. Its active component (green rectangle) is pentacene, an organic semiconductor.
Lynn Loo has been awarded a 2008 Sloan Research Fellowship in the field of chemistry.
Lynn Loo *01, currently teaching at the University of Texas at Austin, will return to Princeton in September 2007 as an associate professor in Chemical Engineering. This month, she is profiled in Chemical Engineering Progress, a publication of AIChE.
Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo (M.A. *98, Ph.D. *01) will receive the 2006 Allan P. Colburn Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers at its November Annual Meeting in San Francisco.