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Computer simulations can be used to explore what happens to water as it is cooled to temperatures below freezing. A recent study found that the supercooled liquid separates into two liquids with different densities.
In today’s issue of the journal Nature, a Letter describes unambiguous evidence for a liquid-liquid transition in a modern model of water—the ST2 model—at deep supercoolings, and even shows coexistence between the two liquid forms, which differ in density and average coordination number.  This behavior is thought to underpin several of the unusual properties of water at shallower undercoolings, such as the steep increases in compressibility, heat capacity, and thermal expa
Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Princeton University’s Dean for Research, will receive the 2014 Benjamin Garver Lamme Award from the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), at a ceremony to be held on June 16 during the 2014 ASEE Annual Conference and Exhibition in Indianapolis.  The Lamme Award “is bestowed upon a distinguished engineering educator for contributions to the art of teaching, contri
On May 13, Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Dean for Research, will deliver the Bird/Stewart/Lightfoot Lecture in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.  The lectureship was inaugurated in 2001 to honor Wisconsin Professors R. Byron Bird, Warren E. Stewart, and Edwin N. Lightfoot and their landmark textbook, Transport Phenomena, which has educated generations
On February 3, Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Dean for Research, will deliver the Warren L. McCabe Lecture in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at North Carolina State University.  The lectureship was created in 1983 to honor Professor Warren L. McCabe of NC State, and previously of the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, who is familiar to generations of chemical engineering students worldwide thr
Pablo G. Debenedetti has been elected as a Fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE),
Each spring, the editors of the Journal of Chemical Physics select a few of the most innovative and influential articles published in the preceding year to highlight to the community as “Editors’ Choice”.  For 2012, one of the five highlighted articles in the “liquids, crystals, and glasses” area was “A Computational Investigation of the Phase Behavior and Capillary Sublimation of Water Confined Between Nanoscale Hydrophobic Plates”, from lead autho
Pablo G. Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor and currently Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been named Princeton University’s Dean for Research (DfR), effective July 1, 2013.  The appointment follows an extensive search, inside and outside Princeton, for a successor to A.J. Stewart Smith, the first incumbent in the DfR position.  The DfR is responsible for encouraging innovation and collaboration across campus, promoting Princeton research to poten
On March 25 and 26, Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor and Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, delivered the 2013 Julian C. Smith Lectures in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell University.  The lectureship was initiated in 1988 to honor Professor Emeritus Julian C. Smith of Cornell, who is familiar to generations of chemical engineering students worldwide through his McGraw-Hill
Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor and Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, has been named the 65th Institute Lecturer for the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).  Each year, the Executive Board of the Program Committee for the AIChE Annual Meeting invites a distinguished AIChE member to present a comprehensive authoritative review of the chemical engineering science in his or her field of spe
At a lunch and ceremony on February 22, open to the entire School of Engineering and Applied Science, the Princeton Engineering Council (E-Council) and Graduate Engineering Council (GEC) jointly recognized a record-breaking FOUR members of the CBE department for their excellence in teaching during Fall 2012.  Professor Yannis Kevrekidis was recognized for his teaching in the graduate-level course CBE 502, “Mathematical Methods of Engineering Analysis II”.  Professor Pablo D
On May 24 and 25, Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor and Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, delivered the 2012 William G. Lowrie Lectures at the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department of Ohio State University.  The lectureship was initiated in 1996 to honor William G. Lowrie, a distinguished alumnus of Ohio State’s Chemical Engineering Department.  It is awarded “once each year
Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor and Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), as announced in a press release issued earlier this week.  The NAS, established by a Congressional act signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863, is a private, non-profit society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the fu
Two CBE faculty were recently named Fellows by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), in the AAAS’ Section on Engineering.  Fellows are selected for their distinguished contributions to science and technology, and are recognized at a special Fellows Forum at the AAAS Annual Meeting (to be held in 2012 in Vancouver, Canada, on February 18).  Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor and Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, was recog
Pablo Debenedetti, Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and Class of 1950 Professor and Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been profiled as the “Featured Educator” in the Summer 2011 issue of Chemical Engineering Education (CEE), a quarterly publication of the American Society of Engineering Education. “Featured Educator” profiles are a recurring series on outstanding chemical engineering educators which appear typically twice per
A simple lattice model of prochiral reactants, chiral products and inert solvent was formulated to study the kinetics of chiral symmetry breaking via asymmetric autocatalysis and inhibition, which have been proposed as key processes in the spontaneous emergence of chiral symmetry breaking in a prebiotic world.
On April 19, Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor and Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, delivered the Eli Ruckenstein Lecture at the Chemical and Biological Engineering Department of the University at Buffalo, State University of New York (SUNY). The lecture series was initiated in 2009 to honor the work of SUNY Distinguished Professor and National Medal of Science recipient Eli Ruckenstein. Debenedetti’s
Molecular simulation illustrating the mechanisms of failure of thin films of amorphous solid water in nano-scale confinement.
Microcin J25 is a small 21-residue antimicrobial peptide exhibiting an interesting "lasso" motif whereby the N-terminal glycine 1 is covalently bonded via a peptide bond to the glutamic acid 8 sidechain to form a loop through which the C-terminus is threaded and sterically locked in place by bulky aromatic groups either side of the ring.
Isolated n-alkane chains in water serve as useful model systems in which to study the role of hydrophobicity in protein folding.
Isolated n-alkane chains in water serve as useful model systems in which to study the role of hydrophobicity in protein folding. A nonlinear dimensionality reduction technique known as the diffusion map, was applied to long molecular dynamics simulations of n-alkane chains to systematically extract order parameters describing the slow, fundamental dynamics of the chain.
In the current issue of Chemistry World, prizewinning science journalist Philip Ball writes about the phenomenon of protein unfolding -- the prevention of which, in his words, would "keep the egg unscrambled". The article includes extensive quotes from Chemical Engineering professor and SEAS Vice-Dean Pablo Debenedetti.
As part of its Centennial Celebration, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers has published, in the October issue of Chemical Engineering Progress, a gallery of "100 Chemical Engineers of the Modern Era", 11 of whom are Princeton faculty and graduate alumni.
Pablo Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor of Chemical Engineering and Vice Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, will receive the 2008 William H. Walker Award for Excellence in Contributions to Chemical Engineering Literature from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) at its November Annual Meeting in Philadelphia.
Pablo G. Debenedetti, Class of 1950 Professor in Engineering and Applied Science, received the President's Award for Distinguished Teaching at the University's Commencement ceremony on June 3, 2008.
Professor Pablo Debenedetti has received the 2008 SEAS Distinguished Teacher Award from Princeton's School of Engineering.
The American Academy of Arts & Sciences, has elected Professor Pablo Debenedetti and Professor Emily Carter to its 2008 Class of Fellows.
Chemical Engineering faculty and students were among those included in the Princeton Engineering's Commendation List for Outstanding Teaching and Princeton's Engineering Council's Excellence in Teaching Awards.
Pablo Debenedetti, the Class of 1950 Professor in Engineering and Applied Science, will be appointed as Vice Dean of the School of Engineering.
Rotational trajectory of a unit vector on a model molecule representing the glass-forming substance ortho-terphenyl. This computer simulation illustrates the progressive slowing down of rotational motion upon cooling, which occurs as molecules become trapped in a transient cage of immobile neighbors.
Chemical Engineering faculty and students were among those included in the School of Engineering and Applied Science's Commendation List for Outstanding Teaching for courses taught in the Spring of 2007.
Researchers were surprised to find a highly simplified model molecule that behaves in much the same way as water, a discovery that upends long-held beliefs about what makes water so special.
Pablo Debenedetti, the Class of 1950 Professor in Engineering and Applied Science, has been named the recipient of the 2008 American Chemical Society's (ACS) Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in the Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry of Liquids.
Pablo Debenedetti delivered the 2007 Reilly Lectures in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Notre Dame on April 3 and 4.
Earlier this week, three faculty members and three graduate students form Chemical Engineering received commendations from the School of Engineering for outstanding teaching.
Professor Pablo Debenedetti and graduate student Richard Lunt were recently presented with Excellence in Teaching Awards from Princeton's Engineering Council.
Professor Pablo Debenedetti has been invited to present at the 2006 James M. and Catherine T. Patten Distinguished Lecture held by the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Professor Pablo G. Debenedetti was honored by the University of Michigan's Department of Chemical Engineering with the Donald L. Katz Lectureship on April 7-8. 2005.
M. Scott Shell, a fourth-year graduate student working with Professors Debenedetti and Panagiotopoulos, has obtained a significant theoretical result on the properties of saddles in multidimensional potential energy surfaces (energy landscapes). The research, published January 23 in Physical Review Letters, has important implications for the theory of the glass transition.