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<<  February 19, 2013   >>
Tuesday, February 19
2/19 - Seminar (organic): Richard Hooley, UC Riverside
<p>Richard Hooley - <a href="http://research.chem.ucr.edu/groups/hooley/" target="_blank">speaker's webpage</a><br />Department of Chemistry<br />University of California, Riverside</p>
<p><strong>Biomimicry with Synthetic Receptors: Self-Assembly and Molecular Recognition</strong></p>
<p><img src="http://www.princeton.edu/chemistry/events_archive/images/hooley-seminar-cartoon-2013.jpg" alt="" name="" width="293" height="198" hspace="4" align="right" />The focus of our laboratory is on novel multicomponent self-assembly and molecular recognition processes. Our work on multicomponent self-assembly centers on controlling the interior space of self-assembled metal ligand complexes in order to mimic the behavior of enzyme active sites in a purely synthetic environment. Assembly can be controlled by coordination of derivatized bis-pyridine ligands with palladium salts, or by novel coordination motifs involving late main group metal-based assembly. The complexes can be analyzed by NMR techniques (including Diffusion NMR and 2D NOESY), ESI mass spectrometry and X-Ray crystallography. Self-sorting behavior is observed, controlled by substitution on the <em>interior</em> of the complex. Tuning the size of the internal substituent allows selective heterocluster formation, determined by non-covalent and space-filling interactions. This novel method of self-sorting allows discrimination between ligands of identical geometry and donor type.</p>
<p>In addition, we have shown that water-soluble deep cavitands (small molecules capable of selective aqueous molecular recognition) can be incorporated into a membrane bilayer assembled onto a nanoglassified surface. The receptors retain their selective host properties, and real-time analysis <em>via</em> surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence microscopy is possible. These receptors have applications in biorecognition processes of proteins and living cells, as well as the ability to direct nanoscale synthesis at the bilayer water interface.</p>
Frick Chemistry Laboratory, Taylor Auditorium  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.