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Princeton’s “New” Typeface: Princeton Monticello

Princeton Monticello is the core typeface for Princeton’s new graphic identity because it is historically related to the University. While rooted in the 18th century, Princeton Monticello has a vibrancy in detail and overall character that makes it distinctive today.

Monticello is modeled after a typeface from the late 18th century by America’s first successful type foundry — Binny & Ronaldson in Philadelphia. The typeface owes its modern incarnation to Princeton University Press, which commissioned its design in the 1950s as a historically accurate typeface for the publication of “The Papers of Thomas Jefferson” — accounting for the typeface’s name. In 2003, the press commissioned renowned type designer Matthew Carter to create a digital version of Monticello for its continued publication of Jefferson’s papers.

Originally a book face, new display and bold versions make it ideal for text and display settings. Princeton Monticello is recommended for use as a text and display face in all Princeton publications.

While Princeton Monticello is for sale to the public through Linotype, it is available free of charge to members of the Princeton community after access is granted by subscribing to the identity listserv. To join, send an e-mail -- using your PU netID -- to commpro@princeton.edu.

Macintosh platform: download a zipped archive that contains the necessary resources.
Windows platform (with administrative privileges): download a zipped archive that contains the necessary resources.
Windows platform (DeSC): please contact your SCAD to arrange for installation.