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2000-2001 Visiting Fellows

Penny Edgell Becker received the Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Chicago in 1995 and is currently Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cornell University. She is the author of Congregations in Conflict: Cultural Models of Local Religious Life (1999) and the co-editor (with Nancy Eiesland) of Contemporary American Religion: An Ethnographic Reader (1997). At the Center she is pursuing her work on the Religion and Family Project, of which she is Principal Investigator.  
Marc Dollinger received the Ph.D. in History from UCLA in 1993 and is currently Assistant Professor at Pasadena City College. He is the author of Quest for Inclusion: Jews and Liberalism in Modern America (2000) and co-editor of the forthcoming Jews of California. At the Center Marc is working on his current project, Turning Inward: American Jews and the Politics of Cultural Nationalism, 1965-1980.
   
Marla Frederick holds the Ph.D. in Cultural Anthropology from Duke University and will become Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Cincinnati after her stay at Princeton. Her dissertation is entitled "The Cultural Politics of Religious Experience: African Ameican Women’s Spirituality and Activism in the Contemporary U.S. South." She is the postdoctoral fellow for the Center’s Project in Religion, Race, and Gender. She is spending this year revising her dissertation for publication. 
   
Kathryn A. Johnson received the Ph.D. in History from the University of Pennsylvania in 1997 and is currently Assistant Professor of History and Director of American Studies at Barnard College. She is the author of the forthcoming The Split-Level Catholic: Faith, Citizenship, and Suburban Family Life in Postwar America. At the Center she is continuing her archival research on Catholic sexuality and attitudes toward fertility, working toward completion of a book project on the transformation of Catholic identity in the 1950s.
   
Prema Kurien received the Ph.D. in Sociology from Brown University in 1993 and is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Southern California. Her book, Kaleidoscopic Ethnicity: International Migration and the Reconstruction of Community Identities, is forthcoming. At the Center Prema is working on a project entitled, "The Emergence of American Hinduism."
   
Lisa Materson received the Ph.D. in History from UCLA in June 2000. She has published an article, "Sisterhood, Ideology, and the Women's International league for Peace and Freedom: Formulating Policy on the Arab-Israeli Conflict During the 1960s and 1970s," in the UCLA Historical Journal. At the Center she will be working to transform her study, "Respectable Partisans: African American Women in Electoral Politics, 1870 to 1944," into a book manuscript for publication. 
   
Charles Mathewes received the Ph.D. in Religion from the University of Chicago in 1997 and is Assistant Professor of Religious Ethics at the University of Virginia. His book, Evil and the Augustinian Tradition, is forthcoming. At the Center he is writing about the role of religion in American public life for a project entitled, "During the World: Religion, Politics, and Culture."

   
Sally Shafto received an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Film-Art-Aesthetics from the University of Iowa in June 2000. She is the postdoctoral fellow for this year's Thematic Project on Religion and Cinema, coordinated by Princeton Professors P. Adams Sitney and Jeffrey L. Stout. Her dissertation is entitled, "Ut pictura cinema: The Strange Adventure of Jean-Luc Godard." At the Center she will continue her work on Godard, exploring Godard's expression of religious interests vis a vis the filmmaker Philippe Garrel. 
   
Lisa Sideris, received the Ph.D. in Religious Studies from Indiana University in 2000. She is the postdoctoral fellow for this year's Thematic Project on Darwin and Religion, coordinated by Princeton Professor of English William Howarth. She will be working on a book project based on her dissertation, "The Limits of Theodicy: Ecological Theology, Natural Selection, and the Problem of Suffering in Nature."