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Past Fellows • 前任研究员

2013-2014


Cheng-Chwee Kuik (郭清水) is on leave from the National University of Malaysia (UKM) where he is an associate professor at the Strategic Studies and International Relations Program. From August 2012-August 2013, he is a Visiting Research Fellow at Oxford's Department of Politics and International Relations, and concurrently an Associate Member of the Nuffield College. Cheng-Chwee researches on China-Southeast Asia relations, regional multilateralism, weaker states' alignment choices, and East Asian security. His English and Chinese publications have appeared in Chinese Journal of International Politics (forthcoming), Asian Politics and Policy (2012), Contemporary Southeast Asia (2008 & 2005), Shijie Jingji yu Zhengzhi (2004), as well as edited books. His article "The Essence of Hedging: Malaysia and Singapore's Response to a Rising China", which was part of his doctoral dissertation, was awarded "The 2009 Michael Leifer Memorial Prize", a biennial award established by the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS) in memory of the late Professor Michael Leifer, for the best article published in one of the three ISEAS journals. Cheng-Chwee holds a PhD from the Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) and an M.Litt. in International Security Studies from the University of St. Andrews. He was a recipient of the British Chevening Award and the Fulbright Graduate Scholarship. He has held visiting fellowships at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for International Studies, Lee Kong Chian Reference Library (Singapore), SAIS Southeast Asia Studies Program, American University's ASEAN Studies Center, and the Centre for Strategic and International Studies (Jakarta). He is a member of the Community of East Asian Scholars (Bangkok). During the CWP fellowship year, he will be working on a project concerning the role of bilateralism in the evolution of East Asian multilateralism during the post-Cold War era.

Cheng-Chwee can be contacted at cckuik@gmail.com.  He will be in residence at Princeton.  He will hold office hours on Wednesdays 1-3 pm and you can make an appointment here: https://wass.princeton.edu/pages/login.page.php


Tabitha Grace Mallory (马碧珊) specializes in international relations and Chinese foreign and domestic policy. Her current research interests include China’s role in global governance, environmental issues, and sustainable agriculture. As a CWP fellow, she will be working on a book manuscript on China and global fisheries governance based on her dissertation entitled “China, Global Governance, and the Making of a Distant Water Fishing Nation.” Dr. Mallory also conducts research on China-Africa relations, with a focus on the environmental aspects of that relationship, and has led research delegations to both China and Africa. Dr. Mallory completed her Ph.D. in international relations at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). She was a visiting scholar at Peking University’s School of International Studies, and an A. Doak Barnett Fellow at SAIS. She was a Hopkins Scholar and holds a certificate in Chinese Studies from the Hopkins-Nanjing Center; and a B.A. in international studies and Mandarin Chinese from the University of Washington. Dr. Mallory has also worked as a research associate at The National Bureau of Asian Research, an organization dedicated to informing and strengthening U.S. policy toward Asia.

She will be in residence at Princeton.  She will hold office hours on Wednesdays 1-3 pm and you can make an appointment here: https://wass.princeton.edu/pages/login.page.php.

2012-2013


Dawn Murphy (瑞黎明) specializes in Chinese foreign policy and international relations. Her current research analyzes China’s interests and behavior as a rising global power towards the existing international order and China’s relations with the Middle East and Sub-Saharan Africa. As a CWP fellow, she worked on a book manuscript based on her dissertation entitled "Rising Revisionist? China’s Relations with the Middle East and Sub-Saharan Africa in the post-Cold War Era." This project is based on extensive field work conducted as a Visiting Scholar with the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing, China; a Visiting Research Fellow with the American University in Cairo, Egypt; and a Visiting Researcher at Stellenbosch University’s Centre for Chinese Studies in South Africa. She is a visiting adjunct professor at George Washington University. 

Dr. Murphy received her B.S. in Industrial and Labor Relations from Cornell University and Master of International Affairs from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science at George Washington University. 


Xiaoyu Pu(蒲晓宇)has research interests in international security, international relations theories, and Chinese foreign policy. During the CWP fellowship period, he worked on a book manuscript based on his dissertation entitled “Limited Rebranding: Status Signaling, Multiple Audiences, and the Incoherence of China’s Grand Strategy.” Challenging the conventional wisdom that rising powers always maximize their prestige and status, this project aims to provide a two-level theory of status signaling in international politics and to explain the seemingly incoherent grand strategy of contemporary China. In addition, he worked on some article manuscripts on such topics as diplomatic signaling, rising powers, and the change of international order. His previous research has appeared in journals such as International Security, The China Quarterly, Asian Affairs, World Economics and Politics as well as in edited volumes. He has received grants and award from Mershon Center for International Security Studies and American Sociological Association. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at University of Nevada, Reno. From 2009 to 2012, he has taught at Ohio State as an instructor, and has received department chair’s commendation for excellence in teaching. Xiaoyu Pu holds a BA and an MA from Nankai University in Tianjin, and another MA from Kent State University in Ohio. He received his PhD in political science from the Ohio State University.


Courtney J. Fung (nee Richardson) (馮康雲) specializes in Chinese foreign policy, international organizations, and non-traditional security issues. As a CWP fellow, Dr. Richardson revised her PhD dissertation, "The Chinese Mirror Has Two Faces? Understanding China's United Nations Peacekeeping Participation" for publication. Dr. Fung's book manuscript explores China’s United Nations Security Council activity regarding intervention as a means to understand broader trends in Chinese foreign and security policy. She concluded extensive fieldwork for this project, including participant observation at the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations. 

Dr. Fung holds a PhD in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, where she was awarded the Peter Ackerman Dissertation Prize for her doctoral thesis. She also holds an M.A. in Security Policy Studies from the George Washington University, and a B.Sc. (Hons) in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Dr. Fung is also a graduate of the Middlebury College Chinese Summer Language School, where she was a Kathryn Davis fellow. Additional training includes participation in the Institute for Qualitative and Multi-Methods Research, Syracuse University and the Graduate Institute for Teaching, Tufts University. Her teaching and research interests include Chinese foreign policy, non-traditional security issues, global governance, and International Relations theory.

Dr. Richardson completed her PhD at Tufts University, where she was also a participant in the Graduate Institute for Teaching. During her PhD studies, Dr. Richardson was a pre-doctoral fellow with both the International Security Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University and with the Global Peace Operations Program at the Center on International Cooperation, New York University. She earned her BSc (Hons) in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and her MA in Security Policy Studies from the George Washington University. Dr. Richardson is also a graduate of the Middlebury College Chinese Summer Language School, where she was a Katherine Davis Fellow. She is an assistant professor at the Department of Politics and Public Administration at the University of Hong Kong.

She has published in International Peacekeeping and with the Central Party School Press in Beijing. 
 

2011-12


Alison Kaufman is an Asia analyst in CNA's China Strategic Issues Group of the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) in Alexandria, Virginia. At CNA she has worked on issues related to China’s and Taiwan’s military culture, Chinese foreign and security policy, and cross-Strait relations. Her personal research focuses on the historical origins of and current trends in Chinese strategic and foreign policy debates. During the fellowship year she worked on a project entitled “The Sources and Evolution of Chinese Foreign Policy Thinking, 1895-2010,” examining the development of key vocabularies and premises of Chinese elite debates about the nature of the international order and China's place in the world.

Before joining CNA, Dr. Kaufman worked for the World Bank’s China program and at China Radio International in Beijing. She also worked as a subject matter expert on Chinese affairs for a well-known consultancy. Dr. Kaufman holds a Ph.D. in political science with a focus on Chinese political philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley, and a B.A. in East Asian studies from Harvard University. She has also studied Mandarin Chinese in Beijing at Capital Normal University and in Taipei at the International Chinese Language Program. She is the author of “The ‘Century of Humiliation,’ Then and Now: Chinese Perceptions of the International Order” in Pacific Focus (April 2010).


Joel Wuthnow specializes in Chinese foreign policy, international relations theory, international organizations, and U.S.-China relations. As a CWP Fellow, he will be examining China's role and influence in the U.N. Security Council, covering negotiations on Iran, North Korea, Sudan, and others. The author of articles in Issues & Studies, East Asia, and elsewhere, Joel was a Pre-Doctoral Fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution from 2010 to 2011. His degrees are from Princeton (A.B., summa cum laude, in the Woodrow Wilson School), Oxford (M.Phil. in Modern Chinese Studies), and Columbia (Ph.D. in Political Science). He has also spent two years in China studying and conducting research. He is the author of a book, Chinese Diplomacy and the United Nations Security Council (Routledge, 2012) and several articles in East Asia-related academic journals. Dr. Wuthnow is is an Asia analyst in the China Security Affairs Group at teh Center for Naval Analyses (CNA).


Zhenqing Zhang (张振庆) received his Ph.D in Political Science from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities.His research interests focus on China's integration into the global political economy and China's response to the diffusion of global norms.
 
During the fellowship period, he worked on a book manuscript based on his dissertation entitled "From Words to Deeds: Explaining the Implementation of China's Intellectual Property Rights Policy since its WTO Entry." Based on extensive field work in China from 2007 to 2008, this project aims to tease out how interaction between the Chinese domestic societal and state actors shapes attitudes toward the global intellectual property rights (IPR) regime. Dr. Zhang received his B.A. and M.A. from the Beijing Foreign Affairs College,China. He also holds a graduate certificate from the Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies. Hs is an assistant professor of Political Science at Hamline University.
 
 
 

Boliang Zhu is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science and Asian Studies Program at the Pennsylvania State University. His research addresses the politics of globalization and economic development in developing countries. In particular, he works on three major topics: the political economy of FDI and MNCs, globalization and domestic governance, and public opinion on economic integration. While a Fellow, he worked on a book manuscript examining the skill composition of inward FDI in developing countries as well as papers on corruption and public opinion towards globalization. He holds double B.A. degrees in International Politics and Economics from Peking University, an M.A. degree in East Asian Studies from Yale University, and a Ph.D. degree in Political Science from Columbia University.

2010-2011


Andrew S. Erickson works at the U.S. Naval War College where he is an associate professor in the Strategic Research Department and a founding member of the department’s China Maritime Studies Institute (CMSI). He is also a Fellow in the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations’ Public Intellectuals Program. Dr. Erickson received his M.A. and Ph.D.in international relations and comparative politics from Princeton University and graduated magna cum laude from Amherst College with a B.A. in history and political science. His research, which focuses on East Asian defense, foreign policy, and technology issues, has been published widely in such journals as Asian Security (forthcoming), Journal of Strategic Studies, The American Interest, and Joint Force Quarterly. Erickson is coeditor of, and a contributor to, the Naval Institute Press book series, “Studies in Chinese Maritime Development,” comprising China, the U.S., and 21st Century Sea Power, China Goes to Sea (2009), China’s Energy Strategy (2008), and China’s Future Nuclear Submarine Force (2007); as well as the Naval War College Newport Paper China’s Nuclear Force Modernization . During the fellowship year, he worked on a book project concerning Chinese aerospace development. He can be reached through www.andrewerickson.com.

Enze Han

Enze Han (韩恩泽) is currently a Lecturer in the Department of Politics and International Studies at SOAS, University of London.  His research focuses on ethnic politics in China, in particular how domestic politics interact with the international dimension in the making of ethnic group political strategies in China.He is currently working on a book project titled "From Domestic to International: National Identity Contestation and Adaptation in China." Dr. Han's works have been published at Nationalities Papers, Asian Ethnicity, and International Journal of Conflict and Violence. His recent book, Contestation and Adaptation: The Politics of National Identity in China was published by Oxford University Press.

He holds a BA from Beijing Foreign Studies University and an MA from the University of British Columbia and  received his Ph.D in Political Science from the George Washington University.


William Norris received his Ph.D in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. As a Fellow, he worked on a book manuscript based on his dissertation entitled "Economic Statecraft: the Use of Commercial Actors in China's Grand Strategy." This work builds a middle-range theory of economic statecraft that provides both a micro-level theory explaining how states use firms to pursue their strategic goals as well as a macro-level theory explaining the conditions under which economic statecraft is likely to succeed.
 
His broad research interests include East Asian security, business-government relations, Chinese foreign and security policy, and international relations theory—particularly the strategic relationship between economics and national security. His recent work focuses on the use of commercial sector actors to achieve national foreign policy objectives in the context of Chinese grand strategy.
 
Dr. Norris received an A.B. from Princeton University, summa cum laude, in 1999, and has spent significant time abroad studying Chinese and economics. Dr. William Norris is currently an assistant professor at the George Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University where he teaches graduate-level courses in Chinese domestic politics, East Asian security, and Chinese foreign policy.

2009-2010

Todd Hall received his PhD in Political Science from the University of Chicago in 2008.  Todd was a CWP fellow in 2008-09 and 2009-10.  Todd holds a B.A. in International Relations from American University,as well as visiting scholar appointments at the Free University of Berlin and Tsinghua University in Beijing.

Prior to joining the University of Oxford, Dr. Hall held the position of Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Toronto (2010-2013). Research interests extend to the areas of international relations theory; the intersection of emotion, affect, and foreign policy; and Chinese foreign policy. Recent publications include articles in Political Science Quarterly (2012), International Studies Quarterly (2012, co-authored with Keren Yarhi-Milo), Security Studies (2011), Waijiao Pinglun (2011), and The Chinese Journal of International Politics (2010). Dr. Hall is currently working on a book manuscript that examines the role of state-level emotional behavior in international relations entitled Emotional Diplomacy: Official Emotion on the International Stage.


Donglin Han (韩冬临) received his PhD in Social Science from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology in 2009. His dissertation explored the political impact of international return migration on domestic politics in China. While a fellow, he commenced a new project on the attentive public and foreign policy making in China. He has published articles in Asian Survey, Science, Technology and Society, and the China Quarterly. He holds a B.A. with first class honors from City University of Hong Kong, an MPhil. in Social Science from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

Dr. Han is an associate professor at Renmin University of China


Kai He (贺凯) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Utah State University (USU). Before USU, he also taught at Spelman College and Georgia State University. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Arizona State University in 2007. His research interests include international security, international political economy, Asian security, Chinese politics, and research methods. He is the author of Institutional Balancing in the Asia Pacific: Economic Interdependence and China’s Rise (Routledge, 2009). He has also published articles in European Journal of International Relations, Security Studies, The Pacific Review, Journal of Contemporary China, Asian Security, Asian Perspective, and International Relations of the Asia Pacific. During the fellowship year, he worked on a new book project, “Negative Balancing in World Politics,” which examines why and how the United States, China, and Russia have used a new balance of power strategy, negative balancing, to tame each others’ power in order to achieve security under anarchy.

He has received two fellowships for a new research project on China's foreign policy crisis behavior from the East-West Center and the East Asia Institute.

Ye 2

Min Ye (叶敏) is an assistant professor and Director of the East Asian Studies Program in the Department of International Relations at Boston University. She received her Ph.D degree from Princeton University.

Dr. Ye’s teaching and research interests include foreign direct investment policies and regional integration in East Asia. Her dissertation examines how economic liberalization in developing countries is shaped by external linkages and domestic interest group politics with a focus on economic reform in China and India since the late 1970s. In studying Asian regionalism, she centers on China and examines how local governments and transnational corporations serve as the driving force for regional cooperation in East Asia.

Dr. Ye coauthored (with Kent Calder) The Making of Northeast Asia, Stanford University Press, 2010. She has published articles in various journals and presented papers at professional conferences. She is the recipient of various grants at Princeton, including the Bradley Scholarship and Bobst Peace Foundation. External grants include Japan ’s Millennium Education Scholarship and the Pacific Forum Fellowship in Hawaii. She has been a visiting fellow at Waseda University in Japan, Chinese Academy of Social Science in Beijing, SAIS John Hopkins University in Washington DC, and Rajiv Gandhi Foundation in New Delhi.
 

2008-2009


Chong Ja Ian (莊嘉穎) holds Bachelors and Masters degrees from the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, and received his Ph.D. in politics from Princeton University. His research focuses on security issues pertaining to China and the Asia-Pacific but crosses international relations, comparative politics, political sociology, and history. Ian previously worked with the Centre for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C., the Institute of Defense and Strategic Studies in Singapore, the East Asian Institute at the National University of Singapore, and served as an infantry officer in the Singapore Armed Forces. His English and Chinese publications have appeared in Security Studies, Twentieth Century China, Journal of East Asian Studies, Asian Affairs, China Review International, the Institute of Defense and Strategic Studies Working Paper Series, as well as edited volumes and newspapers.

Ian is Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science at the National University of Singapore. His book, Imposing States: External Intervention and State Formation in China, Indonesia, Thailand, 1893-1952, will be published by Cambridge University Press. Ian is currently working on projects examining how collective responses to power transtion by non-leading powers may affect regional order, the uses and misuses of historical data in international relations research on China and its implications, how political liberalisation may affect alliance politics, and the effects of political decentralisation on Qing external relations during the Boxer Episode (1899-1901). 


Andrew Kennedy teaches international politics at the Crawford School of Economics and Government at the Australian National University. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Government at Harvard University in 2007. He also holds a Master's degree in Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University and a B.S. in Psychology from Duke University. His research focuses on international politics in Asia, with particular interest in comparing the foreign policies of China and India. He is the author of The International Ambitions of Mao and Nehru: National Efficacy Beliefs and Foreign Policy (Cambridge, 2012) as well as articles in International Security, The China Quarterly, Asian Survey, and Survival. In addition to serving as a fellow in the China and the World Program, he has been a predoctoral fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard and a post-doctoral fellow at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies.

Jessica C. Weiss received her Ph.D. in political science in 2008 from the University of California, San Diego and joined the faculty at Yale University in July 2009 as assistant professor of political science. Her research explores the connection between domestic politics and the international relations of authoritarian states. Her dissertation, Powerful Patriots: Nationalism, Diplomacy, and the Strategic Logic of Anti-Foreign Protest in China, analyzes the pattern of nationalist protest in China in the post-Mao era. To explain why Chinese and other authoritarian leaders sometimes allow and sometimes suppress nationalist protests, she identifies the conditions under which nationalist protests can be effective diplomatic bargaining chips. Weiss has received fellowships from the Department of Education Fulbright-Hays program, the National Science Foundation IGERT program, and the University of California Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation. She graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University with a B.A. in political science, where she founded the Forum for American/Chinese Exchange at Stanford (FACES).

2007-08


Yinan He (何忆南) is an associate professor at the Whitehead School of Diplomacy and International Relations, Seton Hall University. She received her Ph.D. in political science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her research focuses on politics of memory and reconciliation, East Asian international security, Chinese and Japanese foreign policy, and national identity mobilization and nationalism in East Asia. She is the author of The Search for Reconciliation: Sino-Japanese and German-Polish Relations since World War II (Cambridge University Press, 2009). The book is the first systematic, scholarly study on post-conflict interstate reconciliation, an important but often neglected topic in the field of international relations. Her research has appeared in academic journals of both political science and history disciplines. In addition to her fellowship from Princeton-Harvard China and the World program, She has held An-Wang Postdoctoral Fellow in Chinese Studies at Harvard University, John M. Olin Fellowship in National Security at Harvard University, Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar Fellowship of the United States Institute of Peace, MacArthur Fellowship on Transnational Security Issues, and Japanese Government Mombusho Scholarship sponsored by the University of Tokyo, among others. In 2011-2013, she is selected as a Public Intellectuals Program (PIP) fellow of the National Committee on United States-China Relations. In AY 2012-2013 she is a Visiting Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson School of Princeton University. She holds a B.A. from Peking University and M.A. from Fudan University in international politics.


Manjari Chatterjee Miller is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Boston University. She works on foreign policy and security issues in international relations specializing in South and East Asia. She particularly focuses on rising powers, India and China. Her doctoral work examined the influence of the different experiences of colonialism in India and China on their contemporary foreign policy decisions. She is interested in ideational influences on foreign policy and conceptions of state security and is currently working on the concept of loyalty in military units. Her research has been supported by fellowships from the US Department of Education, the Fairbank Center and South Asia Initiative at Harvard University, and the United Nations Foundation. Prof. Miller holds a PhD from Harvard University, an MSc. from the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, and a BA (Hons) from Lady Shri Ram College, University of Delhi.

Miller’s research has appeared in Foreign Affairs, the New York Times, Asian Security, Foreign Policy, the Indian Express and the Christian Science Monitor. Her work has been supported by grants from the East-West Center, the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, the South Asia Initiative, the Fairbank Center, the Woodrow Wilson School and, the US Department of Education.


Yu Zheng (郑宇) is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at University of Connecticut. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program in 2007-08 after receiving a Ph.D. in Political Science and International Studies from University of California, San Diego. He specializes in international political economy with a regional focus on East Asia and China. His current research interests include foreign direct investment, trade policy, legal system, income inequality in China and other developing countries. He has published articles in the Journal of Contemporary China and Public Opinion Quarterly (forthcoming). He also holds a B.A. in International Economics from Beijing Institute of International Relations.

2006-07


Dingding Chen (陈定定) is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Government and Public Administration at the University of Macau where he teaches Chinese Politics and International Relations.  His current research interests include China's foreign policy, East Asian security, human rights in international relations, International Relations theory, and legal reforms in China.  His dissertation, “Transformation from within: Chinese Agency and International Human Rights Norms”, examines how and why changes in China’s human rights policy have taken place since 1978 by focusing on both international and domestic factors. In 2005-06, he was a visiting instructor in Government Department at Dartmouth College.  Dingding Chen was affiliated with the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University during his tenure as a CWP Fellow.  Dr. Chen holds a B.A. in International Economics, Renmin University of China, China and an M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from the University of Chicago.


M. Taylor Fravel is Associate Professor of Political Science and member of the Security Studies Program at MIT. He studies international relations, with a focus on international security, China and East Asia. His current projects examine the evolution of China’s military strategy since 1949 and the relationship between material capabilities and political influence in China’s rise as a great power.

Taylor’s first book, Strong Borders, Secure Nation: Cooperation and Conflict in China’s Territorial Disputes, was published by Princeton University Press in 2008 (Series in International History and Politics). His other publications have appeared in International Security, Foreign Affairs, Security Studies, International Studies Review, The China Quarterly, The Washington Quarterly, Journal of Strategic Studies, Armed Forces & Society, Current History, and Asian Survey as well as in edited volumes. His research has been supported by various organizations, including the National Science Foundation, the United States Institute of Peace, and the Smith Richardson Foundation. In March 2010, he was named Research Associate with the National Asia Research Program launched by the National Bureau of Asian Research and the Woodrow Wilson International Center.

Taylor is a graduate of Middlebury College and Stanford University, where he received his PhD. He has been a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, a Predoctoral Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University, a Fellow with the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program and a Visiting Scholar at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also has graduate degrees from the London School of Economics and Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.
 

Injoo Sohn (孙仁柱) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at the University of Hong Kong. He also taught at the George Washington University, worked for the U.S. Congress (the Subcommittee on International Terrorism and Non-Proliferation), and consulted for the Intergovernmental Group of 24 (G-24) and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). His earlier research fellowships at the Shanghai Institute for International Studies (SIIS) and at the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) were on Chinese foreign economic policy. He was also a commissioner of the Warwick Commission on International Financial Reform. He has published articles in China Quarterly, European Journal of International Relations, Global Governance, and Review of International Political Economy (forthcoming). He is currently the principal investigator of a RGC-funded research project entitled “the Genesis and Design of China-centered Regional Institutions in the Developing World”. He holds a B.A. in Asian History from Seoul National University, an M.A. in Asian Studies and a Ph.D. in Political Science from the George Washington University.


Phillip Stalley is currently an assistant professor in the Political Science Department at DePaul University, teaching courses on international relations, Asian Politics, Chinese politics and environmental politics. He received an MA in East Asian Studies and Ph.D. in International Relations from George Washington University. His research focuses on Chinese environmental politics.  He is the author of Foreign Firms, Investment, and Environmental Regulation in the People's Republic of China (Stanford University Press, 2010).  His current project focuses on China’s approach to international environmental institutions.

2005-06


Xu Xin (徐昕) (Ph.D., Cornell) is an Adjunct associate professor in the Department of Government at Cornell University and acting director of the China and Asia-Pacific Studies (CAPS) program. Prior to joining the faculty at Cornell, Xu Xin was the acting director of the China and the World Program from 2006-07, when Tom Christensen was appointed to the U.S. Department of State. He was also formerly Associate Professor of International Relations in the Department of International Politics at Peking University in China, and Associate Professor of Asia Pacific Studies at Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University in Japan. He was also a Visiting Research Fellow at the Japan Institute of International Affairs, an International Fellow at the Charles F. Kettering Foundation in the U.S., and a Postdoctoral Fellow on national security in the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University. His current areas of interest include the Taiwan issue, East Asian security politics, Asian regionalism and multilateralism, and China’s foreign policy.


Scott L. Kastner is an Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Government and Politics, University of Maryland, College Park. He graduated from Cornell University (1995), and received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, San Diego (2003). In 2005-2006 he was a visiting research fellow in the Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program, and in 2007-2008 he was China Security Fellow at the Institute for National Strategic Studies, National Defense University. His book, Political Conflict and Economic Interdependence across the Taiwan Strait and Beyond, was published in the Studies in Asian Security series by Stanford University Press (2009). His work has also appeared in the following journals: International Security, Journal of Conflict Resolution, International Studies Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, Security Studies, Journal of Peace Research, Foreign Policy Analysis, Journal of Contemporary China, and Journal of East Asian Studies.

http://www.bsos.umd.edu/gvpt/kastner/)