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Eight join SEAS faculty this fall


Maria Klawe, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), welcomed eight new faculty members in September, bringing the total number of SEAS faculty to 126, including 15 women. Of the eight newcomers, three are women.

The new faculty members are introduced here in alphabetical order.

Craig Arnold

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Craig Arnold

Craig Arnold was appointed assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering.

Since 2001 he has been a postdoctoral associate at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., where his research focused on laser direct-write deposition of mesoscale energy-storage systems and sensors, pulsed laser micromachining and deposition for polymer substrates and combinatorial fatigue studies on metals, and conformal antennae for unmanned vehicles and portable devices.

He holds a 1994 bachelor's degree in mathematics and physics from Haverford College and a 2000 Ph.D. in experimental condensed-matter physics from Harvard University.

Patrick Cheridito

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Patrick Cheridito

Patrick Cheridito was named assistant professor of operations research and financial engineering.

A visiting research fellow at Princeton since last year, he specializes in financial engineering.

He holds bachelor's and doctoral degrees from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich and is a recipient of the Dimitris N. Chorafas Foundation award for his doctoral dissertation titled "Regularizing fractional Brownian motion with a view towards stock price modeling."

His areas of research interest are hedging under constraints, risk measures, and fractional Brownian motion.

Mung Chiang

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Mung Chiang

Mung Chiang has been appointed assistant professor of electrical engineering. Previously he worked part-time as a member of the technical staff at SBC Communications Inc. while completing his 2003 Ph.D. in electrical engineering at Stanford University.

He also holds a a 1999 bachelor's degree and a 2000 master's degree from Stanford, where he was a Hertz graduate fellow, a Stanford graduate fellow, and a National Science Foundation fellow. Professor Chiang also received a New Technology Introduction Contribution Award from SBC Communications.

His research interests are resource allocation in wireless and high-speed networks; bandwidth allocation, congestion control, and power control; information theory and stochastic analysis of communication systems; convex optimization, distributed algorithms and duality methods; and statistical physics interpretation of interconnected information systems.

Jianqing Fan

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Jianqing Fan

 

Jianqing Fan was named professor of operations research and financial engineering.

A specialist in statistics, he has served as a faculty member at the University of North Carolina and the Chinese University of Hong Kong over the last 14 years.

He also has been chair of the statistics department of Chinese University, where he received teaching awards in 2001 and 2002.

In addition, Professor Fan received the 2000 President's Award from the Committee of Presidents of Statistical Societies.

He is a member of the International Statistical Institute and a fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the American Statistical Association.

He served on the board of the International Chinese Statistical Association from 2000 to 2002.

The author of three books, Professor Fan serves as associate editor of The Annals of Statistics, the Journal of the American Statistical Association, and Statistica Sinica.

He earned his bachelor's degree from Fudan University in China, his master's degree from Academia Sinica in China, and his doctoral degree from the University of California at Berkeley.

His research interests are quantitative finance and risk management, high-dimensional data analyses, likelihood theory, nonparametric tests, wavelets, generalized linear models, analysis of longitudinal data, nonlinear time series, model selections, data-analytic modeling, survival analysis, and statistical decision.

Claire Gmachl

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Claire Gmachl

Claire Gmachl was named associate professor of electrical engineering.

She comes to Princeton from Bell Laboratories at Lucent Technologies, where she was a member of the technical staff in the Semiconductor Physics Research Department.

Her research interests are quantum cascade lasers for analytic spectroscopy, wireless and optical communications applications, microcavity lasers with chaotic resonators, group-III nitride devices, nonlinear optics in semiconductor heterostructures, and technology transfer to industry.

Prior to Bell Labs, Professor Gmachl was an assistant professor at the Institute for Solid State Electronics, Center of Microstructures at the Technical University of Vienna in Austria.

Professor Gmachl has received numerous awards and honors, including being named to the TR 100 list in the May 2002 issue of Technology Review magazine from Massachussets Institute of Technology, serving as a distinguished lecturer for IEEE/LEOS, receiving the commendation for excellence in technical communications from Laser Focus World Magazine, receiving the outstanding performer award from the U.S. Department of Defense, and corecipient of the NASA Group Achievement Award.

She received her B.Sc. in physics and mathematics and her M.Sc. in physics from the University of Innsbruck, Austria. Her 1995 Ph.D. in electrical engineering is from the Technical University of Munich and the Technical University of Vienna.

Vicky Henderson

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Vicky Henderson

Vicky Henderson was named an assistant professor of operations research and financial engineering.

A specialist in asset pricing, she has been a Noumra Research Fellow at the University of Oxford since 2001.

She also has served as a senior research fellow at Warwick Business School in England and a postdoctoral researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

A graduate of the University of Technology in Australia, she earned her doctorate in 1999 from the University of Bath in England.

Her research interests are in the application of probability theory and stochastic calculus to financial markets. The main themes in her research are incomplete markets and exotic options, including passports, jump-diffusion models, and stochastic volatility.

She also is interested in applications to financial economics, including real options and executive compensation.

Nicholas Pippenger

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Nicholas Pippenger

Nicholas Pippenger was named professor of computer science.

Professor Pippenger comes to Princeton from the University of British Columbia, where he has been a professor since 1988. In 2001 he was awarded a Canada Research Chair in Computer Science.

From 1973 to 1989 he held positions as a research staff member and a fellow at International Business Machines. Prior to that he was a staff member at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory.

He is the author of Theories of Computability, published by Cambridge University Press in 1997, and he has written numerous papers on computational complexity theory, communications network switching, and probability theory, among other topics.

Professor Pippenger received his B.S. from Shimer College in 1965 and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1974.

He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, the Academy of Science, the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and the Association for Computing Machinery.

Professor Pippenger received the Incredible Instructor Award from the UBC Computer Science Department in 1998 and was twice named honorable mention for that award.

Olga Troyanskaya

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Olga Troyanskaya

Olga Troyanskaya comes to Princeton as a joint appointment in the Department of Computer Science and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics. She joins as assistant professor.

Professor Troyanskaya recently completed her Ph.D. in biomedical informatics at Stanford University.

Her thesis title was "Improving the specificity of biological signal detection from microarray data."

At Stanford, Professor Troyanskaya was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Predoctoral Fellow and a Stanford Graduate Fellow.

Her 1999 bachelor's degree in computer science and biology is from the University of Richmond, where she received the Maze Award for the most outstanding graduate.



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