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Justifying Europe: the accidental impact of political elites on European integration

Oct 4, 2017  ·  12:15 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  Robertson 023

Organized by the EU Program, co-sponsored by the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society

Konstantin Vössing is an associate professor of Political Science at Humboldt University (HU) Berlin. He has had previous appointments as assistant professor of Political Science at HU Berlin from 2009 to 2016, as Jean Monnet Fellow at the Robert Schuman Center of the European University Institute (EUI) during the academic year 2015/16, as John F. Kennedy Memorial Fellow at the Center for European Studies (CES) at Harvard University from September 2013 to August 2014, and as lecturer of Political Science and International Studies at Ohio State University during the academic year 2008/09. Vössing received his PhD in Political Science from Ohio State University in August 2008. He studies how political elites and ordinary citizens form preferences about controversial political issues, and how elites shape political views and the political behavior of citizens through mobilization, persuasion, and information provision. His research investigates both contemporary examples of political conflict, such as European integration, and historical cases, such as the formation of class politics. He combines the comparative analysis of macro-historical developments and configurations with a micro-level psychological perspective that pays attention to both cognitive and motivational factors.

Do EU Central Bankers Dream of Political Union?

Oct 11, 2017  ·  12:15 p.m. 1:15 p.m.  ·  Robertson 023

Organized by the EU Program, co-sponsored by the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society and the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance

When it was originally conceived during the run up to the Maatricht Treaty, Europe’s monetary union was supposed to promote political union through the impact of the single currency on popular identity and national policy commitments.  Meanwhile, central bankers were supposed to remain politically independent.  They might support the European project as individuals, but they did not see political union as essential either for their status as guardians of the common monetary policy for the success of the euro.  Fast forward three decades and the situation is very different.  The euro may not have divided Europeans, but its influence in fostering a common identity has been limited (to say the least).  More important, national policies have diverged rather than coming together.  This divergence has been problematic both for the conduct of monetary policy and for the stability of the euro.  European central bankers have emerged as ever more vocal advocates of political union as a consequence.

Erik Jones (’88) is Professor of European Studies and International Political Economy at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and senior research fellow at Nuffield College, Oxford.  He is author of, inter alia, The Politics of Economic and Monetary Union (2002), Economic Adjustment and Political Transformation in Small States (2008), and The Year the European Crisis Ended (2014).  He has edited or co-edited more than thirty books or special issues of journals on European politics and political economy including The Oxford Handbook of the European Union (2012) and The Oxford Handbook of Italian Politics (2015).  His most recent edited collection is on ‘Dysfunctional Democracy’ (Government & Opposition, 2017).  He is co-editor of Government & Opposition and contributing editor for Survival.  Professor Jones moved to Europe after spending the summer between his junior and senior years as an intern in Paris with ‘Princeton in France’.  He is still trying to complete the ‘study abroad’ part of his education.

The State of Europe and the World

Oct 12, 2017  ·  4:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  Robertson Hall Bowl 16

Organized by the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination, co-sponsored by the EU Program and the European Crises Group

Jose Manuel Barroso is the former President of the European Commission (2004-2014) and the former Prime Minister of Portugal (2002-2004)

The Political Economy of Working Time and Inequality in Europe

Oct 25, 2017  ·  12:15 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  Robertson 023

Organized by the EU Program, co-sponsored by the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society

The EU Reforms Agenda under the Macron-Merkel Alliance

Nov 8, 2017  ·  12:15 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  Robertson 023

Organized by the EU Program, co-sponsored by the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society and the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance

Anne-Laure Delatte is a tenured Researcher at CNRS (French Institute for Scientific Research). She has been the Deputy Director of CEPII since October 2016 and a member of Conseil d'Analyse Economique (Council of Economic Analysis, an independent, non partisan advisory body reporting to the French Prime Minister). She has been a visiting scholar at Princeton University from September 2014 to July 2017. Her research includes works on the Euro crisis, sovereign risk and banks foreign investments.

Welfare or Work? Deservingness and the Politics of Public Assistance in Europe and the United States

Nov 15, 2017  ·  12:00 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  Robertson 023

Organized by the EU Program, co-sponsored by the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society

Sigrun Kahl is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Political Science at Yale University. Sigrun studies how long-term comparative historical factors such as religion shape current policies and institutions for addressing, among other things, poverty, unemployment, education, and abortion. Among courses Sigrun teaches are Welfare States Across Nations, Religion and Politics, and Historical and Archival Methods. Sigrun is co-director of the MacMillan Center Initiative on Religion, Politics, and Society and co-runs the Yale Political Science Department’s Comparative Politics Workshop.

Caging the Nation State: Explaining the Crisis of European Integration

Dec 6, 2017  ·  12:15 p.m. 1:15 p.m.  ·  Robertson 023

Organized by the EU Program, co-sponsored by the Program in Contemporary European Politics and Society and the Julis-Rabinowitz Center for Public Policy and Finance

Matthias Matthijs is Assistant Professor of International Political Economy at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC. His research focuses on the politics of economic crises, the role of economic ideas in economic policymaking, and the limits of regional integration. He is author of Ideas and Economic Crises in Britain from Attlee to Blair (Routledge, 2011) and co-editor of The Future of the Euro (Oxford University Press, 2015). He has published numerous peer-reviewed articles in journals like Perspectives on Politics, Governance, Politics & Society, Review of International Political Economy, Government and Opposition, Journal of European Public Policy, Journal of European Integration, and The International Spectator. He has also written essays for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Journal of Democracy, Survival, and Current History.

Populism in Europe as a Problem of Social Integration

Feb 14, 2018  ·  12:15 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  TBD

Aspirational Iconography: Becoming European in Postcommunist States

Apr 18, 2018  ·  12:15 p.m. 1:20 p.m.  ·  TBD

Tenth Annual Princeton Workshop on European Integration

May 4, 2018  ·  8:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.  ·  TBD