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Teaching

Academic Year 2005-2006

Economics 323

International Monetary Economics

Peter Kenen

This course studies the macroeconomics of open economies under various exchange-rate regimes. It examines the functioning of currency markets, how international linkages affect macroeconomic behavior and workings of monetary and fiscal policies, and the roles of investors and speculators in spot and forward currency markets. It reviews the evolution of the monetary system and studies current policy problems, including the global roles of the dollar, euro, and yen, the benefits and costs of European monetary union, currency and debt crises in emerging-market countries, the activities of the IMF, and proposals for reform of the monetary system.

Economics 353

International Monetary Economics

Helene Rey, Olivier Jeanne

This course studies the macroeconomics of open economies under various exchange-rate regimes. It examines the functioning of currency markets, how international linkages affect macroeconomic behavior and workings of monetary and fiscal policies, and the roles of investors and speculators in spot and forward currency markets. It reviews the evolution of the monetary system and studies current policy problems, including the global roles of the dollar, euro, and yen, the benefits and costs of European monetary union, currency and debt crises in emerging-market countries, the activities of the IMF, and proposals for reform of the monetary system.

Economics 372 - European Politics and Society 342

Topics in Country and Regional Economics: Economics of the European Union and Economies in Europe

Silvia Weyerbrock

This course studies the economies of current and prospective European Union (EU) members and economic integration in Europe after 1945. It explores the political motivation for, and the economic implications of, the European Union's moves towards ever deeper integration and enlargement. Topics include policy-making in the EU, adoption of common policies including European Monetary Union and the Euro and their implications for fiscal and labor market policies, problems raised by an EU enlargement to the East, and economic transition in EU applicant countries. The course uses economic analysis to study policy issues.

Freshman Seminar 135

Crafting Constitutions

Kim Scheppele

Our seminar will explore the constitutional aspirations of government, focusing on the crafting of constitutions from the Philadelphia Convention to the present day. Our inquiry will center on the arguments and justifications for constitutions made in the heat of the moment. Wherever possible (that is, where translations of the relevant documents allow us to read in English), we will examine the arguments and products of constitution-writers as they were putting words to paper, before history could tell them whether they would succeed in creating functioning constitutional regimes. Our course, therefore, is part political theory and part legal history, exploring the reasons for, the arguments about, and the fads and fashions in constitution-writing over the last two centuries. Roughly half of the semester will be spent on a detailed analysis of the arguments and debates surrounding the drafting of the American constitution. Each member of the class will be assigned to represent a state or a major framer in the Philadelphia Convention, and your job will be to explain the positions of your character or state to your fellow class members as the convention proceeds. In short, we will do a role-play of the constitutional convention. We will use as our guide the major source of information we have about those days in Philadelphia: the notes taken during the convention by James Madison. By reading Madison's notes together, we can understand the ideas offered, accepted, and rejected as well as explore the dynamics of the constitutional debate. In the second half of the course, we will examine some constitutional conventions that have taken place since that time in other places. To make our task manageable, we will look at just a few constitutional debates in just a few countries -- France, Germany, and South Africa. In these debates, as in the American case, we will focus on constitutional context and justification, on the way political leaders understood the historical moments in which they acted, and on the theoretical bases of their constitutional understandings. Our seminar will close with a consideration of the newest constitutions on the international stage -- the new constitution of Afghanistan, the interim constitution in Iraq, and the proposed constitution for the European Union. The U.S. has not had the last word in how to craft a constitution. While written constitutions were something revolutionary and new in the late 18th century when the American constitution was drafted, they are the international norm today. We will trace how written constitutions came to be the obvious way to accomplish a political transition over the last two centuries. New constitutions being forged in our own time show how unthinkable ideas in the 18th century have become constitutional commonplaces now. (Tuesday 1:30-4:20 p.m.)

History 366

Germany since 1806

Harold James

This course sets German history in a comparative context of international politics, demonstrating how nationalism and national unity emerged as responses to the European state system in the first half of the 19th century, how after 1871 German problems in turn affected the world, and finally why after 1945 Germany should be so prominent in super-power politics. It examines the origin of the German Revolution of 1989, and the place of Germany in the global order.

Politics 372

Political Economy of Western Europe

Instructor: Jonas Pontusson

Different patterns of industrialization produce differences in the political organization of capitalism, i.e., in the position and role of labor and in relations between business and the state. This course explores the historical roots of these differences and their implications for contemporary politics and policy. It focuses on France, West Germany, Britain, and Sweden. Two lectures, one preceptorial.

European Politics and Society 300 - Politics 384

European Politics and Society in the Twentieth Century

Instructor: Ezra Suleiman, Jan-Werner Mueller

The course aims to cover the critical developments of twentieth-century Europe and the consolidation of democracy in European countries. It will deal with the legacy of the two world wars, Nazism, Stalinism, the Cold War, the legacy of colonialism and decolonization, the birth and development of the European Community, the development of the welfare state, the problems confronting the European Union (immigration, enlargement, political institutions, military role), and the varieties of democratic institutions in Europe.

Politics 583

The Logic of the West

John Ikenberry

This seminar is on the nature of the Western interstate system that includes the liberal democracies of Western Europe, North America, and Japan. The course explores the proposition that this political system has a distinct logic and character that has been misunderstood by both dominant Realists and Liberal international relations theorists. Course open to Politics seniors by permission.

Politics 981

What's Left? The Politics of Social Justice in Contemporary Europe

Ezra Suleiman

Woodrow Wilson School 402

Integrating "Islamic" Turkey into "Christian" Europe

Mario Zucconi

Woodrow Wilson School 402h

Integrating “Islamic” Turkey into “Christian” Europe.

Mario Zucconi

Even after the decision to start accession negotiations, Turkey’s integration into the European Union continues to encounter strong resistances in European capitals. Turkey’s Islamic culture, its having been the “other” that, during many centuries, allowed the Europeans to talk of a common, “Christian” identity, are elements that still play a role in the aversion to that country’s inclusion in the Union especially among the European public. Islam-inspired terrorism in the US and Europe and the perception of an overstretched Union due to the recent inclusion of former Communist countries only made the situation more difficult and complex for Turkey. Just the same, the inclusion of Turkey into the Union represents a test of the ability of that institution to continue to progress in its role of democracy promoter and as main factor of political stability in a wide region – in continental Europe and in the Mediterranean. Turkey’s membership would enhance the EU’s credentials – as a culturally tolerant and secular club of countries – with the wider Islamic world and make that institution an increasingly important actor in today’s world politics.

Woodrow Wilson School 401

Relations with Europe and Russia after War in Iraq

Professor Pending

Woodrow Wilson School / 556b

Topics in IR: The Atlantic Partnership and the Management of Global Order

Mario Zucconi

Vital, irrelevant or taken for granted? Both in the US and in Europe opinions greatly diverge on the post-Cold War importance of the six decades old transatlantic partnership. In recent times, especially the quarrel over Iraq has raised serious questions about the enduring relevance and solidity of the partnership. The course analyzes the evolution of this partnership from a primarily security community into a condition of tightly intertwined economies and societies, and of common normative environment. It looks at the strong gravitational power exerted by the United States and Europe as the greatest force conditioning and shaping world politics in the post-Cold War era. The course also explores the reasons why, in contrast with such a capability to project rules and values, and to enlarge the “zone of peace” around themselves, the transatlantic partners continue to find it difficult to shape a new arrangement among them for dealing with failed and difficult states, and for confronting international terrorism.

Politics 590 / Woodrow Wilson School 556F

Democracy, Constitutionalism and Global Governance

Andrew Moravcsik and Jan-Werner Müller

This course engages recent normative and positive scholarship on the democratic legitimacy of global governance, with particular attention to examples drawn from the constitutional debate in the European Union. The course poses three issues: (1) Which arguments underlie the major normative positions taken in contemporary philosophical debates about global justice? (2) Is it advisable, in fact is it possible, to strike a balance between these positions, and if so, what might give such these positions philosophical coherence? (3) Through what mechanisms can these various philosophical ideals best be realized in real-world international politics? To what extent and under which conditions are they likely to succeed? And in what ways and under what conditions do (and should) philosophical differences over the meaning of democracy influence practical political decision-making? These issues will be addressed with the assistance of guest speakers. This course is designed for graduate students in political philosophy, political science and public policy.

Robertson Hall
Robertson