79. Nineteenth-Century Proctors 

 

In the nineteenth century, all duties related to student discipline fell to Princeton’s top administrators and faculty members until President McCosh instituted the office of the Proctor in 1870.  The first incumbent was Matthew Goldie, brother of the College’s gymnasium director George Goldie.  Johnny Topley, pictured here, succeeded Goldie as the Chief Proctor in 1892, and his name frequently echoed across the campus as students sang of their fervent wish to stay out of his way, “Johnny, Johnny Topley, do you want me? No-O Sir-ee!”  But in 1907, when Topley resigned his proctorship and opened a saloon in town, the students changed the lyrics: “Johnny, Johnny Topley, do you want me? YES, Sir-ee!”

  • To learn more about George Goldie, see Café Vivian picture #6, and 7.

  • To learn more about James McCosh, see quotation #9 and Café Vivian picture #6, 8, 11, 18, 68, 75, 95, and 101.

  • To learn more about student life at Princeton, see icon #1, quotation #7, 9, 18, and 22, and Café Vivian picture #9, 12, 16, 18, 23, 24, 45, 53, 82, 84, 89, 92, 96, 97, 106, 109, 113, 115, 116, 117, 129, and 132.

CLOSE