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Journal Issue: Children and Divorce Volume 4 Number 1 Spring/Summer 1994

History and Current Status of Divorce in the United States
Frank F. Furstenberg

Endnotes

  1. Lichtenberger, J.P. Divorce: A social interpretation. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1931; Halem, L.C. Divorce reform: Changing legal and social perspectives. New York: Free Press, 1980.
  2. O'Neill, W.L. Divorce in the progressive era. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1973.
  3. Weitzman, L.J. The divorce revolution: The unexpected social and economic consequences for women and children in America. New York: Free Press, 1985.
  4. Goode, W.J. World revolution and family patterns. NewYork: Free Press, 1963; Davis, K., ed. Contemporary marriage. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1985.
  5. Hobbs, F., and Lippman, L. U.S. Bureau of the Census. Children's well-being: An international comparison. International Population Reports, Series P-95, No. 80. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990.
  6. See note no. 1, Halem; Glendon, M.A. Abortion and divorce in western law. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1987; Glendon, M.A. The transformation of family law. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989.
  7. Carter, H., and Glick, P.C. Marriage and divorce: A social and economic study. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1976; Preston, S.H., and McDonald, J. The incidence of divorce within cohorts of American marriages contracted since the Civil War. Demography (1979) 16:1–25; Weed, J.A. National estimates of marriage dissolution and survivorships: United States. Vital and Health Statistics, Series 3 (Analytic Statistics), No. 19. DHHS/PHS 81-1043. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 1980.
  8. Stone, L. Road to divorce: England 15301987. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990.
  9. Cherlin, A.J. Marriage, divorce, remarriage. Rev. ed. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1992.
  10. See note no. 7, Preston and McDonald.
  11. National Center for Health Statistics. Advance report of final divorce statistics, 1988. Monthly Vital Statistics Report, Vol. 39, No. 12, Suppl. 2. Hyattsville, MD: Public Health Service, 1991.
  12. Martin, T.C., and Bumpass, L.L. Recent trends in marital disruption. Demography (1989) 26:37–51.
  13. Norton, A.J., and Miller, L.F. U.S. Bureau of the Census. Marriage, divorce and remarriage in the 1990's. Current Population Reports, Series P-23, No. 180. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992.
  14. Saluter, A.F. U.S. Bureau of the Census. Marital status and living arrangements: March 1991. Current Population Reports, Series P-20, No. 461. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, April 1992.
  15. Bianchi, S.M., and Spain, D. American women in transition. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1986.
  16. Saluter, A.F. U.S. Bureau of the Census. Marital status and living arrangements: March 1992. Current Population Reports, Series P-20, No. 468. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, December 1992.
  17. See note no. 7, Carter and Glick.
  18. U.S. Bureau of the Census. Households, families, and children: A 30-year perspective. Current Population Reports, Series P-23, No. 181. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992, Figure 6.
  19. See note no. 7, Weed. See also Bumpass, L.L., Martin, T.C., and Sweet, J.A. The impact of family background and early marital factors on marital disruption. Journal of Family Issues (1991) 12:22–42.
  20. Bumpass, L.L., and Raley, R.K. Trends in the duration of single-parent families. National Survey of Families and Households, Working Paper No. 58. Madison: University of Wisconsin, 1993.
  21. Bane, M.J. Here to stay: American families in the twentieth century. New York: Basic Books, 1976; Spanier, G.B., and Glick, P.C. Marital instability in the United States: Some correlates and recent changes. Family Relations (1981) 31:329–38.
  22. Bumpass, L.L., Sweet, J.A., and Martin, T.C. Changing patterns of remarriage. Journal of Marriage and the Family (1990) 52:747–56.
  23. Bumpass, L.L., Sweet, J.A., and Cherlin, A. The role of cohabitation in declining rates of marriage. Journal of Marriage and the Family (1991) 53:913–27.
  24. Morgan, S.P., McDaniel, A., Miller, A.T., and Preston, S. Racial differences in household and family structure at the turn of the century. American Journal of Sociology (January 1993) 98:799–828; Ruggles, S., and Goeken, R. Race and multigenerational family structure, 1900–1980. In The changing American family. S.J. South and S.E. Tolnay, eds. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1992, pp. 15–42.
  25. Cherlin offers a cogent summary of the debate. See note no. 9, Cherlin.
  26. Gutman, H.G. The Black family in slavery and freedom 1750-1925. New York: Vintage Books, 1977; McAdoo, H.P. Black families. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage, 1981. See note no. 24, Morgan, McDaniel, Miller, and Preston.
  27. Bennett, N.G., Bloom, D.E., and Craig, P.H. American marriage patterns in transition. In The changing American family. S.J. South and S.E. Tolnay, eds. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1992, pp. 89–108.
  28. Espenshade, T.J. The recent decline of American marriage: Blacks and whites in comparative perspective. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, 1985.
  29. Bean, F.D., and Tienda, M. The Hispanic population in the United States. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1988; U.S. Bureau of the Census. Hispanic Americans today. Current Population Reports, Series P–23, No. 183. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1993.
  30. U.S. Bureau of the Census. Fertility of American women: June 1990. Current Population Reports, Series P-20, No. 454. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1991.
  31. National Center for Health Statistics. Advance report of final natality statistics, 1990. Monthly Vital Statistics Report, Vol. 41, No. 9, Suppl. Hyattsville, MD: Public Health Service, 1993.
  32. See note no. 4, Davis. See also Haskey, J. Formation and dissolution of unions in the different countries of Europe. In European population. Vol. 2. A. Blum and J.L. Rallu, eds. Paris: John Libbey Eurotext, 1993, pp. 211–29.
  33. See note no. 32, Haskey.
  34. Cherlin, A.J., and Furstenberg, Jr., F.F. The changing European family: Lessons for the American reader. Journal of Family Issues (1988) 9:291–97.
  35. Kieman, K., and Chase-Lansdale, P.L. Children and marital breakdown: Short- and longterm consequences. In European population. Vol. 2. A. Blum and J.L. Rallu, eds. Paris: John Libbey Eurotext, 1993, pp. 295–307.
  36. See note no. 4, Davis.
  37. Ross, H.L., and Sawhill, I.V. Time of transition: The growth of families headed by women. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute, 1975. Goode, W.J. The family. 2d ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1982. Levinger, G., and Moles, O.C. Divorce and separation. New York: Basic Books, 1979. Bernard, J. Women, wives, mothers. Chicago: Aldine, 1975. Nelson, R.R., and Skidmore, F. American families and the economy: The high costs of living. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1983. Becker, G.S. A treatise on the family. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1981. Sweet, J.A., and Bumpass, L.L. American families and households. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1987.
  38. Veroff, J., Douvan, E., and Kulka, R.A. The inner American: A self-portrait from 1957 to 1976. New York: Basic Books, 1981. Thornton, A., and Freedman, D. The changing American family. Population Bulletin (1983) 38:2–44. Bumpass, L.L. What's happening to the family: Interactions between demographic and institutional change. Demography (1990) 27:483–98.
  39. Lesthaeghe, R., and Meekers, D. Value changes and the dimensions of families in the European community. European Journal of Population (1986) 2:225–68.
  40. Wright, G.C., and Stetson, D.N. The impact of no-fault-divorce-law reform on divorce in American states. Journal of Marriage and the Family (1978) 40:575–80.
  41. Thornton, A. Changing attitudes towards separation and divorce: Causes and consequences. American Journal of Sociology (1985) 90:856–72.
  42. See note no. 38, Bumpass.
  43. Furstenberg, Jr., F.F. Conjugal succession: Reentering marriage after divorce. In Life span development and behavior. Vol. 4. P.B. Baltes and O.G. Brim, eds. New York: Academic Press, 1982, pp. 107–46.
  44. Blankenhom, D., Bayme, S., and Elshtain, J.B., eds. Rebuilding the nest: A new commitment to the American family. Milwaukee, WI: Family Service America, 1990; Jost, K., and Robinson, M. The CQ Researcher: Children and divorce. Congressional Quarterly Inc. in conjunction with EBSCO Publishing (June 7, 1991) 1,5:349–68; Hewlett, S.A. When the bough breaks: The cost of neglecting our children. New York: Harper Perennial, 1991; Gill, R.T. For the sake of the children. The Public Interest (Summer 1992) 108:81–96.
  45. Bumpass, L.L., and Sweet, J.A. Children's experience in single-parent families: Implications of cohabitation and marital transitions. Family Planning Perspectives (November/December 1989) 21:256–60; Furstenberg, Jr., F.F., and Cherlin, A.J. Divided families: What happens to children when parents part. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991.
  46. Uhlenberg, P. Death and the family. In The American family in social-historical perspective. M. Gordon, ed. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1983, pp. 169–78.
  47. See note no. 45, Furstenberg and Cherlin.
  48. See note no. 23, Bumpass, Sweet, and Cherlin. See also Furstenberg, Jr., F.F., Nord, C.W., Peterson, J.L., and Zill, N. The life course of children of divorce: Marital disruption and parental conflict. American Sociological Review (1983) 48:656–68.
  49. Hofferth, S.L. Updating children's life course. Journal of Marriage and the Family (1985) 93–115. See note no. 45, Bumpass and Sweet.
  50. U.S. Bureau of the Census. The Hispanic population in the United States: March 1989. Current Population Reports, Series P–20, No. 444. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990.
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  62. This conclusion is surprising, especially in view of the fact that most existing research relies on comparisons of children in single-parent and remarried families instead of carrying out longitudinal analyses of children making the transition from divorce to remarriage. Cross-sectional comparisons often fail to account for differences in families where remarriage does and does not occur. They also frequently ignore the experience of children whose parents have remarried and redivorced, counting them as continually divorced.
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