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The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Anne M. Gothmann on successfully defending her Ph.D. thesis.
Now in the Policy Debate: Literally putting a price on carbon pollution and other greenhouse gasses is the best approach for nurturing the rapid growth of renewable energy and reducing emissions, according to a new policy article published in Nature. The authors – which include the Wilson School's Michael Oppenheimer – urge policymakers to implement a range of policies until the time that a carbon price becomes politically realistic.
Dangerous storms are one reason the Southern Ocean is so under-researched, although it absorbs almost half of the world’s man-made carbon emissions. Last week, more than 50 researchers (Ethan Campbell '16 and Preston Kemeny '15) returned from a scientific voyage of Antarctica, the first leg of a two-year experiment – the 3rd Southern Ocean Seasonal Cycle Experiment – that aims to fill in many of the blank spaces about how this ocean mitigates the effects of climate change.
We've (Ethan Campbell '16 and Preston Kemeny '15) have been incredibly busy on our research cruise to Antarctica! Within this week, we’ve had to get over the sea sickness very quickly as we have been working virtually non-stop. Sandi Smart *14 is a new addition to our team and her project involves collecting foraminifera (“forams”, organisms used in paleoclimate reconstructions) using net tows.
A concern among scientists is that higher Arctic temperatures brought about by climate change could result in the release of massive amounts of carbon locked in the region’s frozen soil in the form of carbon dioxide and methane. New research led by researchers at the Department of Geosciences and published in The ISME Journal suggests that, thanks to methane-hungry bacteria, a majority of Arctic soil might be able to absorb methane from the atmosphere rather than release it.
Have you ever seen an icebreaker roll on the waves? Neither have I, at least from the outside. But after almost two weeks at sea, we have certainly felt it from within.
Animals and plants are not the only things that form fossils. Tsunamis—the huge waves created by some submarine earthquakes—do so, too. They might reasonably wonder when the next big wave will arrive—as might residents of other earthquake-prone coastlines around the world. Alumnus Dr. Harvey M. Kelsey, III '71, of Humboldt State University, in California, has done more than wonder. He and his team have been looking at the Indian Ocean coast of Aceh province, in northern Sumatra.
In response to NASA scientist James Hansen's paper, climate scientist Michael Oppenheimer of Princeton University affirmed: "If we cook the planet long enough at about two degrees warming, there is likely to be a staggering amount of sea level rise. Key questions are when would greenhouse-gas emissions lock in this sea level rise and how fast would it happen? The latter point is critical to understanding whether and how we would be able to deal with such a threat."
This summer, Princeton undergraduate students are gaining new perspectives and opportunities through internships in a variety of fields in more than 50 countries through the University's International Internship Program (IIP).  GEO Undergrad Alyson Beveridge '16 describes her internship teaching English at The Tushita Foundation in Jaipur, India.
Prof. Jack Mustard and his graduate student, Kevin Cannon, at Brown University reported in Geology magazine that they had found impact glass in several craters on Mars.  This discovery is particularly relevant to the Martian crater named after the late Princeton geoscience professor, Robert B. Hargraves *59.  Mustard and his colleagues are proposing to land the Mars Rover 2020 on the impact ejecta from Hargraves Crater.