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Scientists firing powerful pulses of laser beams in experiments at Livermore's National Ignition Facility have for the first time re-created conditions that exist deep in the cores of the solar system's giant planets.
Until now, scientists’ only insight came from computer models. New work at the U.S. National Ignition Facility, nicknamed NIF, which houses the world’s largest laser, is providing the first hard evidence.
One January afternoon five years ago, Princeton geologist Lincoln Hollister opened an email from a colleague he’d never met bearing the subject line, “Help! Help! Help!” Paul Steinhardt, a theoretical physicist and the director of Princeton’s Center for Theoretical Science, wrote that he had an extraordinary rock on his hands, one that he thought was natural but whose origin and formation he could not identify.
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Process (IPCC) provides vital, regular assessments of scientific literature. Yet greater transparency is needed, Princeton University's Michael Oppenheimer told the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology in Washington, D.C. Testifying before the Committee on Science, Space and Technology on Thursday, May 29, Oppenheimer examined the process behind the UN's IPCC Fifth Assessment Report, published earlier this year.
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Process (IPCC) provides vital, regular assessments of scientific literature. Yet greater transparency is needed, Princeton University's Michael Oppenheimer told the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology in Washington, D.C. Testifying before the Committee on Science, Space and Technology on Thursday, May 29, Oppenheimer examined the process behind the UN's IPCC Fifth Assessment Report, published earlier this year.
Slideshow of Students taking beach profile measurements at Island Beach State Park for their course GEO 202 - Ocean, Atmosphere and Climate.
The Geosciences Department announced last week that the Geosciences Gem and Mineral Collection Search Engine is once again available to scientists and the general public, now at its new address — minerals.princeton.edu. The search engine can also be reached through the Geosciences website.
Two undergraduates have been selected to the Environmental Scholars Program by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI). This two-year award was given to geosciences majors, Alison Campion ’16 and civil and environmental engineering major, Elliot Chang ‘16.
Scientists led by a Rutgers University geologist say the Jersey Shore is a world-class place to study sea level rise, and they plan to bombard a swath of the seabed off Long Beach Island with sound waves. Environmentalists, who might normally support research related to climate change, are aghast at the prospect, saying it might harm whales and other marine mammals, as well as New Jersey's vibrant summer seafood and tourism economy.