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An audio interview with atmospheric scientists Jane Baldwin and Prof. Gabe Vecchi on abrupt permafrost thaw & repetitive heat waves from Radio Ecoshock.
Hurricane expert Gabe Vecchi, a professor of geosciences at Princeton University, answers our questions on Hurricane season 2019. (Audio)
Congratulations to the Class of 2019 and Ph.D. Recipients from all of us at the Department of Geosciences.
The current issue of the Spring 2019 Smilodon Newsletter has been published to the Geosciences website. The full issue is available by downloading a Adobe PDF.
Xinning Zhang, assistant professor of geosciences and the Princeton Environmental Institute, was among nine scientists nationwide to receive a three-year 2019 Simons Early Career Investigators in Marine Microbial Ecology and Evolution Award from the Simons Foundation. An environmental microbiologist, Zhang’s research focuses on understanding how microbial metabolism influences biogeochemical cycling and climate in modern and ancient environments.
The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Dr. Wenjie Lei on successfully defending his Ph.D. thesis: "Global Seismic Full-Waveform Inversion" on Wednesday, May 8, 2019.
Science Beyond Guyot: 25 Years of Hess Fellows - A symposium during reunions celebrating the Hess Fellows on Friday, May 31st. Starting at noon.
The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Dr. Jessica Lueders-Dumont on successfully defending her Ph.D. thesis: "Nitrogen Isotopes of Otolith-Bound Organic Matter: A New Tool for Trophic Reconstruction Using Modern and Fossil Otoliths" on Friday, May 3, 2019.
The Princeton Graduate School has presented Geosciences Ph.D. candidate Emma Kast, and six other graduate students, with its annual Teaching Awards in recognition of their outstanding abilities as teachers. Kast was honored for her assistantships in GEO 102 “Climate: Past, Present and Future” and her ability to assist non-STEM students with a clearer understanding of science, technology, engineering or math. The department congratulates Kast at this time of recognition.
When the landmass that is now the Indian subcontinent slammed into Asia about 50 million years ago, the collision changed the configuration of the continents, the landscape, global climate and more. Now a team of Princeton University scientists has identified one more effect: the oxygen in the world’s oceans increased, altering the conditions for life.