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The Department of Geosciences and Princeton University congratulates Brandon T. Stackhouse on successfully defending his Ph.D. thesis: "The Effects of Physical and Biogeochemical Changes on Carbon Emissions from Mineral Cryosols from the Canadian Arctic."
Nearly 200 nations adopted the first global pact to fight climate change on Saturday, calling on the world to collectively cut and then eliminate greenhouse gas pollution but imposing no sanctions on countries that don't.
The warming effects of climate change usually conjure up ideas of parched and barren landscapes broiling under a blazing sun, its heat amplified by greenhouse gases. But a study led by Princeton University researchers (PEI) suggests that hotter nights may actually wield much greater influence over the planet’s atmosphere as global temperatures rise — and could eventually lead to more carbon flooding the atmosphere.
A concern among scientists is that higher Arctic temperatures brought about by climate change could result in the release of massive amounts of carbon locked in the region’s frozen soil in the form of carbon dioxide and methane. New research led by researchers at the Department of Geosciences and published in The ISME Journal suggests that, thanks to methane-hungry bacteria, a majority of Arctic soil might be able to absorb methane from the atmosphere rather than release it.