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The good news for any passionate supporter of climate-change science is that negative media reports seem to have only a passing effect on public opinion, according to Princeton University and University of Oxford researchers. The bad news is that positive stories don’t appear to possess much staying power, either.
WHYY Radiotimes' Marty Moss-Coane talks with Michael Oppenheimer, who served on the IPCC II panel and is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs Princeton University, and Benjamin Horton, who served on the IPCC’s Physical Science Basis report from last fall and is Professor of Sea Level Research at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Science at Rutgers University. (Aired on Radiotimes with Marty Moss-Coane on April 1, 2014)
Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs, Michael Oppenheimer (Geosciences/Woodrow Wilsons School/STEP/PEI/AOS), Michael Mann (Director of the Earth System Science Center, Penn State), and Jeffrey Sachs (Director of the Earth Institute and the Sustainable Development Solutions Network, Columbia University) sit with acclaimed interviewer Charlie Rose to discuss real-time solutions on climate change repercussions.
Our conversation threaded through so many topics, as I peppered Dr. Oppenheimer with questions. So rather than present you with a simple Q&A with him, I've pulled out and highlighted key messages, lessons, observations and themes that came up over the course of an hour -- Dr. Oppenheimer amplifies each one.
Regarding the partial report on climate change due out on Friday, Roger Pielke, an environmental scientist at the University of Colorado in Boulder and Michael Oppenheimer, a Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences, both suggest that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) might better spend its time doing more targeted reports, that take on specific defined issues, and release them more often.