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Carbon capture and storage received a boost from a study that indicated the procedure would not be prone to leakage or high costs related to fixing leaks. “That link was not there before, and that is really what has motivated our study,” said Hang Deng *15, a postdoctoral researcher at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. “I think this is really the first attempt trying to make this link and using the scientific findings to inform global climate change mitigation efforts.”
Now, a new study finds that sea-level rise will boost the occurrence of moderate rather than severe flooding in some regions of the United States, while in other areas the reverse is true. Improving the accuracy of flooding estimates is important as coastal cities and states take actions to protect themselves against future storms, according to Michael Oppenheimer, Princeton’s Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs and the Princeton Environmental Institute.
Princeton and Rutgers researchers have found that climate-related sea-level rise is expected to cause more severe floods in some regions of the country and less severe floods than predicted in other regions of the country.
Regarding the partial report on climate change due out on Friday, Roger Pielke, an environmental scientist at the University of Colorado in Boulder and Michael Oppenheimer, a Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences, both suggest that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) might better spend its time doing more targeted reports, that take on specific defined issues, and release them more often.