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Xingchen Tony Wang

 

Biography

In 2010, I received my B.S. in Geochemistry from Nanjing University, China.  Following, I came to Princeton University to pursue a Ph.D. in Geosciences.

My current research is focused on using nitrogen isotopes of organic matter within biogenic minerals as a proxy for the past marine nitrogen cycle. Any biogenic minerals (coral, foraminifera shell, shark teeth, etc.) trapped a tiny amount of organic matter during the mineralization process, because it is much easier for the organisms to do the mineralization job with organic matrix serving as the crystal nucleus. Thanks to the "denitrifier method" developed in the Sigman Lab (requires 100 times less N than the traditional "combustion method"), we are able to measure the nitrogen isotopes of the very little amount of intracrystallic organic N. This analytical technique works for any kind of biogenic mineral and provides a unique window into the past. My main application of this technique is to use fossil corals (both shallow-water, symbiotic coral and deep-sea, non-symbiotic coral) to understand the marine nitrogen cycle change and its feedbacks to the carbon cycle and climate system. Besides the paleoceanographic application, I also uses nitrogen isotopes to study the nitrogen cycle on coral reefs.

 
 

Department: Geosciences

Mentor: Daniel Sigman

Position: Graduate Student

Area: Paleoceanography/Marine Nitrogen and Carbon Cycle

Office: A15 Guyot Hall

Phone: 609-937-2536

Email: xingchen@princeton.edu