Skip over navigation
Share this:

Development Challenge News

Princeton University researchers deployed a new tool to help solve an old ecological puzzle: How can multiple animals coexist while eating the same resources?
During the Summer of Learning Symposium students presented their research findings on scientific, technical, policy, and human dimensions of a wide-variety of global environmental challenges.
Princeton researchers Lyndon Estes and Tim Searchinger discuss the potential for effective smart agriculture in Africa’s savannas.
On Saturday July 11, roughly 300 school children and community members convened for the annual Community Conservation Day in the Laikipia district of Northern Kenya.
The students were all members of the Northern Kenya Conservation Clubs. The Princeton University Development Challenge managed by the Princeton Environmental Institute supported after-school clubs at eleven schools in Laikipia with the aim of instilling students with ecological awareness and a conservation ethic through experi
On Friday, May 8th, the Princeton Environmental Institute hosted its annual Discovery Day—a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on environmental issues. Over 50 students from 16 academic departments showcased their work which was mentored by 34 faculty advisers.
Discovery Day is a culminating event for students participating in the Program in Environmental Studies and for students receiving field research support from PEI and the Grand Challen
Termites can keep desertification at bay by adding nutrients and helping water infiltrate soil, but the vegetation patterns that result can be confusing.
Robert Pringle, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was named one of nine Early Career Fellows nationwide by the Ecological Society of America (ESA). Fellows are elected by ESA members, and the five-year fellowships recognize early-career researchers for their contributions and potential contributions to ecology.
In 2012, Swahili lecturer Mahiri Mwita approached Princeton University's chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB) with the idea of starting a project in the Kuria District of Kenya where he grew up.
With support from Grand Challenges, a recent study finds that a small percentage of Africa's wet savannas have the potential to produce staple crops while emitting significantly less carbon dioxide than the world's average cropland.
PEI’s Dan Rubenstein speaks with AccuWeather about the significance of zebra’s black and white stipes and how they are affected by weather.
PEI associated faculty member Corina Tarnita is one of five Princeton University faculty members named as  Sloan Research Fellows.
A new video series features Princeton University researchers funded by Grand Challenges working in the biologically rich Mozambique's Gorongosa National Park.
Termites might not top the list of humanity's favorite insects, but new research suggests that their large dirt mounds are crucial to stopping the spread of deserts into semi-arid ecosystems and agricultural lands.

Alex Dominguez '16 presenting his summer research entitled, "Analysis of Mechanisms of Nutrient Cycling in Floodplain Lakes of the Lower Mississippi River, Mississippi." (Photo credit: Angela Petsis)
On Friday, October 3rd, eighty-five (85) Princeton undergraduates participated in the 7th Annual Summer of Learning symposium to share insights and outcomes from their summer 2014 internships and service experiences.
The Summer of Learning Symposium organized by the Prince
Princeton researchers supported  by the Grand Challenges Program have found, overall, water availability has increased in African maize-growing regions, with exceptions in parts of East Africa.
Leaders from industry and academia met recently at Princeton University to discuss three big questions surrounding the broad theme of "water": infrastructure, the water/energy nexus, and industrial water.
A five-year study led by Princeton University researchers suggests that certain wild African animals, particularly elephants, could be a boon to human-raised livestock because of their voracious appetite for the toxic and invasive plant Solanum campylacanthum, or the Sodom apple.
On Friday, May 9th, the Princeton Environmental Institute hosted its annual Discovery Day—a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on environmental topics.
Two Princeton University professors have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, which honors significant contributions to engineering research and education. Jennifer Rexford, the Gordon Y.S. Wu Professor in Engineering and professor of computer science, was recognized for her contributions to the operational stability of large computer networks. Robert Schapire, the David M. Siegel '83 Professor in Computer Science, was elected for his contributions to machine l
Two ENV students, Alexandra Kasdin ‘14 and Claire Gallagher ’14, are among 28  Princeton undergraduates featured in a global summer interactive map.
A Princeton University Grand Challenges research team has created a model to evaluate how a human response to climate change may alter the agricultural utility of land.
"The Matriarch" follows the life of Jada, an elephant and the matriarch of her family who has survived a brutal poaching attack.
“Curse of the Gazelle King” investigates the elusive lives of Grant's Gazelles through one man's story about a young gazelle named Lenana.
Film explores the ways in which the clubs are using experiential learning to educate students about local conservation issues, and how the students then share what they've learned with their families and villages as well.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) is pleased to announce the award of a New Investigator Grant on behalf of the Development Challenge.
“Realignments: A Zebra Story” examines the differences in appearance and behavior of the two zebra species in Kenya, providing insight into the endangerment of the Grevy's zebras and their uncertain future.
On October 4, 2013, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) held its sixth annual Summer of Learning (SOL) Symposium.
Over the course of six weeks in the Global Seminar "Documentary Filmmaking in Kenya: The Art of Science Storytelling," 15 Princeton students were trained in video production, screenwriting and editing to produce short documentaries.
In the Laikipia region of central Kenya, where the land hugs the equator in the shadow of Mt. Kenya, 15 Princeton students and five Kenyan students discovered this summer that there's no smartphone app for figuring out where the gazelles are.
In the Summer of 2013, 73 Princeton undergraduates affiliated with the Princeton Environmental Institute held 8-12 week environmental assignments with faculty-led research projects and as interns with NGOs, government, industry, and academic enterprises in 12 foreign countries and 5 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.
The damage scientists expect climate change to do to crop yields can differ greatly depending on which type of model was used to make those projections, according to research based at Princeton University.
"The River of Muddy Water," looks at the many challenges to water security in Kenya by examining the confluence of Maasai farmers who rely on the Ewaso Ng'iro river for virtually all their water needs.
On Friday, May 10th, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) hosted Discovery Day 2013 - a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on a wide variety of environmental issues.
Spring/Summer 2012 Grand Challenges update.
Brittany Cesarini (right), a former Development Challenge intern, and Sandra Mukasa, will establish an organization in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to target violence and HIV/AIDS.
On September 30 and October 7, PEI hosted its 4th annual Summer of Learning Symposia.
Kelly Caylor, PEI associated faculty member, collaborates on a new project: “Coupling Hydrological Forecasts and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa and China.”
The Progress Report (PDF) provides a summary of Princeton's Grand Challenges Program including novel research and teaching initiatives that address global environmental issues.
It is summer in Princeton, and while the humidity and bees have arrived, nearly 100 Princeton undergraduates have left to begin summer internships through the PEI/Grand Challenges Internship Program.