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Converting a standard shipping container into a sustainable source of energy for remote or disaster-torn regions, a team of Princeton University students took top honors in an 18-month national competition.
Four graduate students have been awarded 2012 PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellowships by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
Converting a standard shipping container into a sustainable source of energy for remote or disaster-torn regions, Princeton students took top honors in an EPA national competition.
Researchers at Princeton University are spearheading a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to study the risks and economics of capturing carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, and storing it underground.
Serving audiences across the ocean.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
After the disaster the need skyrocketed, inspiring a team of Princeton researchers to launch a one-year effort to develop, deploy and test two novel disaster-relief technologies -- a rainwater harvester and filtration system, and a wind turbine for renewable energy production.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
Hoping to help fix the Earth's atmosphere, Catherine Peters recently found herself 4,100 feet underground.
Catherine Peters, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Acting Director of the Energy Grand Challenge program, is leading a university project to evaluate carbon storage, newly funded by the Department of Energy.