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The Southern Ocean that encircles Antarctica lends a considerable hand in keeping Earth's temperature hospitable by soaking up half of the human-made carbon in the atmosphere and a majority of the planet's excess heat.
Princeton Alumni Weekly interviews Mauzerall about health impacts of air pollution and climate change and what to do about them.
Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment (ACEE) have announced awards totaling $780,000 to support eight (8) innovative projects in energy and the environment.
A new study conducted by Princeton University and University of Oxford researchers suggests that climate scientists should reexamine how to effectively and more regularly engage the public.
A decades-long debate over how nitrogen is removed from the ocean may now be settled by new research findings from researchers at Princeton University and their collaborators at the University of Washington.
With support from the Grand Challenges Program, Princeton University researchers and colleagues have confirmed that during the last ice age iron fertilization caused plankton to thrive in a region of the Southern Ocean.
Book cover of "Paleoclimate" authored by Michael Bender, professor of geoscience at Princeton University In his new book “Paleoclimate”, Michael Bender, professor of geosciences at Princeton University and a lead-member of the Carbon Mitigation Initiative (CMI), produced a concise and comprehensive history of the Earth’s climate and how it has changed over time. The field of Paleoclimatology is the study of such changes and their causes. In particular, the stud
Contributed by Joanne Curcio During the second half of 2013, some notable advances were made by Princeton University Cooperative Institute for Climate Science (CICS) researchers. Below is a highlight of recent research conducted by CICS Scientist Meiyun Lin. Asian pollution drifts east toward North America in 2010. Hawaii is denoted by the star. (Source: Nature Geoscience)   Ozone near the Earth’s surface is a greenhouse gas and a health-damaging air pollutant, regulated
A Princeton University Grand Challenges research team has created a model to evaluate how a human response to climate change may alter the agricultural utility of land.
Princeton University is seeking outstanding applications to fill a new tenure-track faculty position in water science.
Princeton University-led research supported by the Carbon Mitigation Initiative suggests that even if carbon-dioxide emissions came to a sudden halt, our planet could continue to warm for hundreds of years.
Ramanan Laxminarayan spearheads Lancet Infectious Diseases Commission report on global solution to antibiotic resistance including the impact on the environment.
Jorge Sarmiento and Daniel Sigman are among Princeton researchers pushing through the challenging conditions of the Southern Ocean because they want to learn more about the waters at the bottom of the globe.
The mystery surrounding the Southern Ocean is just one of the research projects being conducted out of a Princeton University laboratory at the Forrestal Center.
Civil and environmental engineering professor Eric Wood and his research team have developed a drought monitoring and forecast system for sub-Saharan Africa.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) is pleased to announce the award of a New Investigator Grant on behalf of the Development Challenge.
Enhanced growth of Earth's leafy greens during the 20th century has significantly slowed the planet's transition to being red-hot, according to a new research study supported by the Princeton Carbon Mitigation Initiative.
On October 4, 2013, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) held its sixth annual Summer of Learning (SOL) Symposium.
Michael Oppenheimer, geoscientist and PEI associated faculty member, discusses the first of three reports to be released by the IPPC on their fifth assessment of global warming.
Scientists expect climate change and warmer oceans to push the fish that people rely on for food and income into new territory. Results of new research based at Princeton University is reported in the journal Science.
Princeton geosciences professor Michael Bender, an internationally recognized authority on paleoclimate, provides a concise, comprehensive, and sophisticated introduction to the subject.
Climate scientists are surer than ever that human activity is causing global warming, according to leaked drafts of a major UN report, but they are finding it harder than expected to predict the impact in specific regions in coming decades.
The damage scientists expect climate change to do to crop yields can differ greatly depending on which type of model was used to make those projections, according to research based at Princeton University.
Michael Oppenheimer is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences at Princeton University. He is the Director of the Program in Science,Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) at the Woodrow Wilson School and Faculty Associate of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences Program, Princeton Environmental Institute, and The Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies.
In two recent papers in the journals Nature Climate Change and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the researchers present a probabilistic assessment of the Antarctic contribution to twenty-first century sea-level change. A Princeton University release reports that their methodology folds observed changes and models of different complexity into unified projections that can be updated with new information. This approach provides a consistent means to integrate the potentia
George Philander, professor of geosciences at Princeton University, has been a pioneer in studying the complex relationship between oceans and the atmosphere. A South African by birth, he hopes that climate change will foster a science renaissance in Africa. “Instead of telling stories of doom and gloom, we should tell people what an amazing planet we live on,” Philander said, “because it is so amazing.”
Four Princeton University researchers took part in the June 11 report, "A Stronger, More Resilient New York," a comprehensive analysis of New York City's climate risks and proposed steps for preparing for future climate events.
In recent years, according to the authors, our understanding of the relationship between climate and extreme weather has sharpened, along with our appreciation of the vast damages such events cause.
A study of sed­i­ment cores col­lected from the deep ocean sup­ports a new expla­na­tion for how glac­ier melt­ing at the end of the ice ages led to the release of car­bon diox­ide from the ocean.
Research outcomes from Princeton Environmental Institute’s Carbon Mitigation Initiative help advance a probabilistic assessment of the Antarctic contribution to 21st-century sea-level change.
PEI Associated faculty and others at Princeton have been studying extreme weather, natural disasters, and their impact on people and property for years, but Hurricane Sandy pushed their research to the forefront.
Researchers used hydrological and climate change models to predict how much water would likely be available for use in growing crops around the world.
PEI is pleased to announce a call for proposals to encourage research, teaching, and mentorship focused on multidisciplinary aspects of global climate change and energy.
Trees in the con­ti­nen­tal U.S. could send out new spring leaves up to 17 days ear­lier than they did before, accord­ing to a new study by Prince­ton Uni­ver­sity researchers.
Three PEI associated faculty members, Alexander Glaser, M.V. Ramana, and Robert Socolow, are among 17 co-authors of an open letter to President Barack Obama.
A series of recent droughts from Australia to the United States has led some scientists to warn that global warming has already begun to increase worldwide drought.
A recent study coauthored by professor Michael Oppenheimer indicates that available evidence suggests that scientist have been conservative in their projections of climate change impacts.
Climate change is unwelcome news and the best and worst outcomes consistent with current science are very different. This essay addresses new ways the environmental community can freshen the conversation.
Whether it's the economics of clean energy, the politics of Washington or claims over the severity of the problem itself, the debate over climate change is loud and crowded. One aspect that often goes overlooked is the Southern Ocean ringing Antarctica at the bottom of the globe. But that, says Jorge Sarmiento, is about to change.
When the worst drought in 60 years hit America’s corn belt this summer, many people wondered if it was caused by climate change.
An enhanced approach to capturing changes on the Earth's surface via satellite could provide a more accurate account of how ice sheets, river basins and other geographic areas are changing and why.
Earlier this year, the journal "Nature Climate Change" published a paper that measures hurricane behavior in our warming world.
In October, the Princeton University Press and the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) hosted a one day symposium at Princeton University on the Fundamentals of Climate Science.
Michael Oppenheimer, from Princeton University, and other climate scientists combined models that project broad climate changes decades into the future.
Superstorm Sandy is a sign of more things to come, says Michael Oppenheimer, a climate scientist at Princeton University.
Please join us to learn about the state-of-the-art in climate science research directly from climate experts. Come hear the essential facts, asks questions, and engage in stimulating discussions.
The Cooperative Institute for Climate Science (CICS) at Princeton University will start its 10th year with more than $3 million in new federal funding to support climate science and education.
Drought is often the precursor to disaster, but getting leads on its stealthy approach through remote or war-torn areas can be so difficult that relief agencies sometimes have little time to react before a bad situation becomes a calamity.
For anyone looking for warnings about climate change, a good place to go would be just north of Las Vegas to Lake Mead.
Tropical storms in the Atlantic are likely to increase as the Earth’s climate warms in the first half of this century, but not for the reason that many people think.
Scientists say that the catastrophic wildfires in the US West offer a preview of the kind of disasters that human-caused climate change could bring.
Princeton University has one of the most extensive and capable investments in climate science of any institution, suggests Stephen Pacala.
David Medvigy has released a study showing that day-to-day weather variations are growing more erratic and more extreme for at least one-third of the global climate.
In May 2011, geosciences major Sara Nason ’12, was awarded the Becky Colvin Memorial Award by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Colvin family.
Understanding what changed at a million years B.C. could help climate scientists, like Michael Bender, better understand the climate system overall.
Established in 2009, the $25 million endowment fund supports the development of new technologies that have the potential to enable significant scientific and technological advances.
Issac Held receives the BBVA Foundation's "Frontiers of Knowledge Award" in the Climate Change Category.
Princeton researchers reported in Science that tropical savanna wildfires combined with climate conditions maintain the border between savannas and forests.
Yes, science is being distorted. But, much more dangerous, it is being rejected.
The study will be conducted by researchers at the Meadowlands Environmental Research Institute (MERI); Rutgers-Newark, led by Karina Schafer and Princeton University, led by PEI's Peter Jaffe.
Increasingly, many scientists are puzzling over how best to present what they know and don’t know to a broader audience.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) has announced $1.1 million in new awards to support climate and energy research at Princeton University.
Robert Socolow reflects on the need for the global community to find a new starting point for action on climate change.
Small eukaryotic phytoplankton are far more important for taking up upwelled nutrients and for transporting atmospheric carbon dioxide into the ocean interior than their abundance implies.
A proposal from an interdisciplinary group of Princeton faculty has been selected by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) executive committee to become the first PIIRS research community to receive funding under an initiative announced earlier this year.
In the highly politicized world of climate science, public relations can win or lose battles that shape the Earth's future.
What precisely about warming is unequivocal: that it has been ocurring? That it will occur in the future? That the entire problem we call "global warming" is unequivocal in all aspects?
Negotiations this year are smaller and more subdued than last year's climate conference in Copenhagen, with fewer heads of government attending the meetings -- and far fewer protests. But some, like climate expert Michael Oppenheimer of Princeton University, say that less attention may translate to more progress on some important issues. In Copenhagen, expectations were raised so high that they obscured reality, he said.
The University of Cantabria has announced the award of a Honorary Doctor's Degree to Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe.
Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation today announced the winners of the 16th annual Heinz Awards, honoring the contributions of 10 innovative and inspiring individuals whose work has addressed environmental challenges. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.
Princeton University researchers will participate in a $122 million research project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop technologies and educational programs to make buildings more energy efficient.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
Climate change's impacts on crop yields may force as many as seven million Mexicans to emigrate to the U.S. over the next 70 years, according to research published July 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the Keystone Award for Leadership in the Environment.
Two members of the Princeton University faculty have been recognized for major contributions to ecological research.
The oscillations during the past 2.5 million years between ice ages and interglacials were probably triggered by orbital changes, but the observed amplitude and timing of these climate cycles still awaits a full explanation. One notable correlation links lower partial pressure (or concentration) of CO2 with ice ages: changes in CO2 concentration may cause some of the ice-age cooling, but what causes the loss of CO2 is unknown. Daniel Sigman, Mathis Hain and Gerald Haug review the evidence in sup
It is summer in Princeton, and while the humidity and bees have arrived, nearly 100 Princeton undergraduates have left to begin summer internships through the PEI/Grand Challenges Internship Program.
CMI's new tool shows where emitters are today and how the distribution will evolve over the next 20 years.
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Without aggressive action to reduce soot emissions, the time table for carbon dioxide emission reductions may need to be significantly accelerated in order to achieve international climate policy goals such as those set forth in last December's Copenhagen Accord.
Two PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellows, Ning Lin and Luke MacDonald, graduated in June 2010 with Ph.D.s from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and in addition were awarded the Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
To understand why Himalayan glaciers are melting, Princeton Professor Denise Mauzerall looks for causes as far away as Europe and Africa.
The recipients include: Kevin Loutherback, Electrical Engineering; Dalin Shi, Geosciences; and Ann Carla Staver, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.
This has been one of PEI's most enterprising years. We are pleased to share our exciting news with faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends.
In a collaboration melding art with science, climate researchers and other members of the Princeton University community joined forces with The Civilians to help create a work-in-progress about global climate change.
Serving audiences across the ocean.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
While exploring the Panama Canal in a small tourist boat, Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman were startled by a massive container ship suddenly passing by, rocking them violently in its wake. Painted on the hull in Chinese characters, its name was boldly inscribed as "The Great Immensity."
PEI Research and Center News from Spring/Summer 2010.
We are deeply disturbed by the recent escalation of political assaults on scientists in general and on climate scientists in particular. All citizens should understand some basic scientific facts.
Recently, an analysis of Essential Science IndicatorsSM from Thomson Reuters recognized the work of Dr. Lars Hedin as having the highest percent increase in total citations in the field of Environment & Ecology.
Freshman Sarah Bluher spent part of her spring break in the Florida Everglades collecting field samples from an airboat in a water conservation area.
An international group of scientists, ethicists, and governance experts meeting here this week has agreed that research into large-scale modification of the planet is "indispensable" given the "threats" posed by climate change.
A lot of scientists and conservationists find themselves questioning whether science got its due in the latest round of international negotiations on trade in endangered wildlife.
In order to be sure that agreed emissions reductions are taking place, the U.S. must deploy new monitoring technologies, according to a new report.
Students flipping through the course catalog this year may have wondered what a course cross-listed in Atelier, environmental science and theater entailed.
In its final and most powerful report, a U.N. panel of scientists meeting here describes the mounting risks of climate change in language that is both more specific and forceful than its previous assessments, according to scientists here.
Participants shared research findings in climate science, carbon capture and storage and policy from the past year and discussed prospects of future domestic and international climate policy.
If you want to save the planet, think for a minute about the simple plastic cup. Eight or 12 ounces, perhaps emblazoned with a Princeton logo — the University goes through thousands of them each month.
Rising acid levels in the world's oceans appear to be robbing the tiny animals that form the bedrock of the marine food web of a vital nutrient.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
Regarding his plans for the Oil, Energy and Middle East Initiative, teaching and research.
Baker is in residence at PEI for the fall 2009 semester. A native of Texas, she is Director, Well Planning and Geotechnical Operations at BP.
On June 1, 2009, PEI held it's 15th annual Class Day celebration.
A summary of the University's many campus sustainability initiatives.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
Franz, a third year Ph.D. student was awarded a $10,000 grant to continue his research.
"Is Copenhagen the watershed or just another missed opportunity — there’s no way to tell yet," said Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton University climate scientist who attended the talks. 
The question is a potential deal-killer: If nations ever agree to slash greenhouse gas emissions, how will the world know if they live up to their pledges?
Global warming in this century might raise sea levels more than expected in future centuries, says a study that looked at what happened at a time when Neanderthals roamed Europe.
An additional 2 degrees of global warming could commit the planet to 6 to 9 meters (20 to 30 feet) of long-term sea level rise.
How much good can this amount of aid do? How much would be enough if the industrialized nations can’t come to a climate change agreement? Should the United States throw in with this approach if it’s unlikely that Congress will approve any greenhouse gas reduction plan?
The climate problem is caused by prosperity.
Americans' day-to-day lives won't change noticeably if President Barack Obama achieves his newly announced goal of slashing carbon dioxide pollution by one-sixth in the next decade, experts say.
The online publication of sensitive e-mails and documents from a British climate centre is brewing into one of the scientific controversies of the year, causing dismay among affected institutes and individuals.
CMI's "One Billion High Emitters" research makes Time Magazine's 50 Best Inventions of 2009.
In the fall of 2009, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Lewis Center for the Arts initiated a yearlong collaborative project lying at the intersection of the environment and the performing arts.
On September 25, 2009, The Princeton Environmental Institute held its second annual Summer of Learning Symposium.
Catherine Peters, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Acting Director of the Energy Grand Challenge program, is leading a university project to evaluate carbon storage, newly funded by the Department of Energy.
In his new book, "The Princeton Guide to Ecology," Princeton professor Simon Levin has tapped more than 130 experts to compile a concise, authoritative one-volume reference to the major subjects and concepts in ecology.
Biofuels derived from renewable sources can be produced in large quantities and address many problems related to fossil fuels, including greenhouse gas emissions, but only if they are made from certain sources, according to a new article by a team of scientists and policy experts that included several Princeton researchers.
The cap-and-trade law that is solving the acid rain problem is a very rare species: an unmitigated public policy triumph.
Just months before world leaders are scheduled to meet to devise a new international treaty on climate change, a research team led by Princeton University scientists has developed a new way of dividing responsibility for carbon emissions among countries.
Deutsche Bank's Asset Management division (DeAM) today launched the world's first scientifically valid, real-time carbon counter, a nearly 70-foot-tall digital billboard displaying the running total of long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
The 2008 - 2009 Ethics and Climate Change (ECC) Lecture Series appeared on iTunes U, UChannel, and YouTube, and over 10,000 people viewed or downloaded the lectures from these sites.
The second round of initiatives seeking to improve sustainability on Princeton's campus have been funded under the auspices of the University's Sustainability Plan.
The Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) will host a symposium and conference Wednesday through Friday, April 29-May 1, to address challenges related to agriculture and climate change as the global population expands.
Ask Princeton ecologist David Wilcove about the largest threat to the greatest number of species in the next 25 years, and he'll give you a two-word answer. Global warming? No, oil palm.
Energy company BP has committed to a five-year renewal of a joint research partnership with Princeton University that identifies ways of tackling the world's climate problem.
An interdisciplinary group of scholars will examine the ethical dimensions of the challenge presented by climate change in a fall lecture series sponsored by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the University Center for Human Values.
The first round of initiatives has been funded under the auspices of the research, education and civic engagement section of the University's new Sustainability Plan.
After a competitive review process, Princeton University's Cooperative Institute for Climate Science has been selected as a collaborative research partner by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams.
In many ways, H. Vincent Poor, a 1977 graduate alumnus who became dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in June 2006, epitomizes Princeton's tradition of the teacher-scholar.
A new report should spur public debate about how science and technology can best sustain the earth while furthering the goals of humanity, according to Robert Socolow, one of 18 maverick thinkers convened by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) to map the greatest technological challenges of this century.
Snorkeling practice in DeNunzio Pool may be an unusual activity for a freshman seminar, unless the class is going to the Sargasso Sea.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Eleven Princeton faculty members have been involved in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 12.
Princeton faculty members have been invited to submit proposals by Monday, Sept. 17, for seed grants for projects under a new teaching and research program focused on important issues that share dominant environmental, political, social and engineering dimensions
The earth is growing warmer, thanks to elevated concentrations of greenhouse gases, and the vast majority of scientists now believe that human activity, especially the burning of fossil fuels, is primarily responsible.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
PEI Professor François M.M. Morel has received the Einstein Chair Professorship from the Institute of Urban Environment (IUE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).
Have Chinese Coal Plants Been Keeping Global Warming in Check? It all sounds logical, and, says Hiram Levy,"the idea is physically sound." But he's not convinced that this is what's really happening.