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Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) is the only class of mitigation options able to significantly reduce carbon in the atmosphere. A special issue of the journal Climatic Change explores CDR from the perspectives of integrated assessment, technology optimization, and environmental science.
Over 90 participants attended the two-day event. Participants presented new areas of research that complement established efforts already underway in the fields of carbon science, low-carbon energy, fluids and energy, and policy and integration.
Research outcomes from Princeton Environmental Institute’s Carbon Mitigation Initiative help advance a probabilistic assessment of the Antarctic contribution to 21st-century sea-level change.
Several associated PEI faculty members attended the inaugural Princeton-Fung Global Forum to discuss population growth, climate change, and other factors determining "The Future of the City."
Climate change is unwelcome news and the best and worst outcomes consistent with current science are very different. This essay addresses new ways the environmental community can freshen the conversation.
Whether it's the economics of clean energy, the politics of Washington or claims over the severity of the problem itself, the debate over climate change is loud and crowded. One aspect that often goes overlooked is the Southern Ocean ringing Antarctica at the bottom of the globe. But that, says Jorge Sarmiento, is about to change.
Spring/Summer 2012 Research Center updates.
Understanding what changed at a million years B.C. could help climate scientists, like Michael Bender, better understand the climate system overall.
One of the greatest challenges facing today’s policymakers is to find ways to meet the growing global demand for energy and to do so in more sustainable ways.
Yes, science is being distorted. But, much more dangerous, it is being rejected.
Robert Socolow reflects on the need for the global community to find a new starting point for action on climate change.
A proposal from an interdisciplinary group of Princeton faculty has been selected by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) executive committee to become the first PIIRS research community to receive funding under an initiative announced earlier this year.
Technologies for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere unlikely to slow climate change in near term, according to American Physical Society study led by Robert Socolow.
Francois Morel, Albert G. Blanke, Jr., Professor of Geosciences and former director of PEI honored at award ceremony on March 29 at the 241st American Chemical Society national meeting.
Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the Keystone Award for Leadership in the Environment.
CMI's new tool shows where emitters are today and how the distribution will evolve over the next 20 years.
PEI Research and Center News from Spring/Summer 2010.
Participants shared research findings in climate science, carbon capture and storage and policy from the past year and discussed prospects of future domestic and international climate policy.
Baker is in residence at PEI for the fall 2009 semester. A native of Texas, she is Director, Well Planning and Geotechnical Operations at BP.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
The Carbon Mitigation Initiative (CMI) at the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) has just launched its new website: cmi.princeton.edu.
GLG Partners has engaged Mercer's investment consulting business, to examine if the perceived need to tackle the issues around climate change and other major environmental issues is resulting in a change in focus and approach for mainstream investing.
The United States could meet projected growth in energy demand through 2030 with existing technologies, but the nation's long-term energy sustainability will require an enduring commitment, by both the public and private sectors, to developing, demonstrating and deploying new technologies and energy sources, according to a National Academy of Sciences committee chaired by Princeton Professor and President Emeritus Harold T. Shapiro.
Biofuels derived from renewable sources can be produced in large quantities and address many problems related to fossil fuels, including greenhouse gas emissions, but only if they are made from certain sources, according to a new article by a team of scientists and policy experts that included several Princeton researchers.
Just months before world leaders are scheduled to meet to devise a new international treaty on climate change, a research team led by Princeton University scientists has developed a new way of dividing responsibility for carbon emissions among countries.
Robert Socolow, a Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will receive the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Frank Kreith Energy Award for his pioneering contributions in energy research.
Energy company BP has committed to a five-year renewal of a joint research partnership with Princeton University that identifies ways of tackling the world's climate problem.
In many ways, H. Vincent Poor, a 1977 graduate alumnus who became dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in June 2006, epitomizes Princeton's tradition of the teacher-scholar.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Princeton Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Fred Dryer has a lofty goal: end the nation's reliance on oil for jet travel.
The earth is growing warmer, thanks to elevated concentrations of greenhouse gases, and the vast majority of scientists now believe that human activity, especially the burning of fossil fuels, is primarily responsible.