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With support from the Grand Challenges Program, Princeton University researchers and colleagues have confirmed that during the last ice age iron fertilization caused plankton to thrive in a region of the Southern Ocean.
Jorge Sarmiento and Daniel Sigman are among Princeton researchers pushing through the challenging conditions of the Southern Ocean because they want to learn more about the waters at the bottom of the globe.
New research by geosciences professor Daniel Sigman and colleagues indicates that the cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis controls the production of a nutrient essential to the health of the ocean.
DAVIS — Two species of bacteria living on the ocean floor have teamed up in a unique symbiotic relationship to form a critical link in the Earth’s nitrogen cycle, reports a research team that includes two University of California, Davis, microbiologists. The scientists, led by researchers affiliated with the University of Southern California, will publish their findings about the novel bacterial partnership Aug. 8 in the journal Nature. At the heart of the study are the long, thin,
The Grand Challenges Program has awarded three New Investigator Grants for 2013-2014. The awards support innovative mentorship of undergraduates working on multidisciplinary aspects of global climate change. Two of the supported projects will allow undergraduates to address issues at the interface of climate and oceans. Jorge Sarmiento, professor of geosciences, will mentor students working on Southern Ocean observations and modeling, arranging for them to work directly wit­­­h his g
A study of sed­i­ment cores col­lected from the deep ocean sup­ports a new expla­na­tion for how glac­ier melt­ing at the end of the ice ages led to the release of car­bon diox­ide from the ocean.
Whether it's the economics of clean energy, the politics of Washington or claims over the severity of the problem itself, the debate over climate change is loud and crowded. One aspect that often goes overlooked is the Southern Ocean ringing Antarctica at the bottom of the globe. But that, says Jorge Sarmiento, is about to change.
Established in 2009, the $25 million endowment fund supports the development of new technologies that have the potential to enable significant scientific and technological advances.
Sigman receives the 2012 European Association of Geochemistry (EAG) Science Innovation Award.
Small eukaryotic phytoplankton are far more important for taking up upwelled nutrients and for transporting atmospheric carbon dioxide into the ocean interior than their abundance implies.
The oscillations during the past 2.5 million years between ice ages and interglacials were probably triggered by orbital changes, but the observed amplitude and timing of these climate cycles still awaits a full explanation. One notable correlation links lower partial pressure (or concentration) of CO2 with ice ages: changes in CO2 concentration may cause some of the ice-age cooling, but what causes the loss of CO2 is unknown. Daniel Sigman, Mathis Hain and Gerald Haug review the evidence in sup
Daniel Sigman, a Princeton University biogeochemist who has conducted pioneering work exploring the large-scale systems that have supported life on the planet throughout the millennia, has been selected as a 2009 MacArthur Fellow.
Sigman's research provides new evidence of a tight connection between high dust input to the Southern Ocean and the emergence of the deep glaciations that characterize the past one million years.