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Researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh find first evidence that natural selection favors an individual’s tolerance to infection.
Two Princeton University professors have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, which honors significant contributions to engineering research and education. Jennifer Rexford, the Gordon Y.S. Wu Professor in Engineering and professor of computer science, was recognized for her contributions to the operational stability of large computer networks. Robert Schapire, the David M. Siegel '83 Professor in Computer Science, was elected for his contributions to machine l
A Princeton University Grand Challenges research team has created a model to evaluate how a human response to climate change may alter the agricultural utility of land.
Princeton University is seeking outstanding applications to fill a new tenure-track faculty position in water science.
Civil and environmental engineering professor Eric Wood and his research team have developed a drought monitoring and forecast system for sub-Saharan Africa.
Princeton University is seeking applications from distinguished candidates with demonstrated excellence in scholarship and teaching at the intersection of humanities and the environment.
Princeton University has appointed as dean for research Pablo Debenedetti, a longtime Princeton engineering professor, vice dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and PEI associated faculty member.
This two-day conference assembled leaders from a range of fields in the environmental humanities and prominent artists producing work with environmental import.
Infection with Klebsiella pneumoniae is a serious danger to older hospitalized patients, with an estimated mortality rate as high as 40 percent. It has generally been treated with broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics. Another class of antibiotics, carbapenems, is used as an antibiotic of last resort for the most persistent infections.
In this study, we examine trends in the resistance of clinical K. pneumoniae isolates from acute care, long-term care, and outpatient settings across different US geographic regions. Using nationally representative surveillance data that encompass a longer time span and larger isolate count than has been used to date, we characterize the epidemiology of third-generation cephalosporin–resistant and carbapenem-resistant phenotypes of K. pneumoniae between 1999 and 2010. Results are stratified by
A series of recent droughts from Australia to the United States has led some scientists to warn that global warming has already begun to increase worldwide drought.
Forests absorb around one quarter of the carbon dioxide that humans produce, but one small insect pest is jeopardizing this good work, with potentially serious consequences for climate change.
"Our study shows that biodiversity also seems important in boosting economic welfare – probably through its impact on buffering disease outbreaks,” said co-author Andrew Dobson.
Climate change is unwelcome news and the best and worst outcomes consistent with current science are very different. This essay addresses new ways the environmental community can freshen the conversation.
The market for alternative energy technologies shows many areas of promise but also is beset by major uncertainties over regulation and tax policy.
A controversial program that uses the private market to provide affordable malaria treatments to people in Africa has dramatically increased access to care and should be continued, says Ramanan Laxminarayan.
Michael Oppenheimer, from Princeton University, and other climate scientists combined models that project broad climate changes decades into the future.
As part of a series, All Things Considered asked Princeton evolutionary biologist Iain Couzin for his perspective on the science of leadership.
A team of five Princeton engineering graduate students is leading a yearlong field research project using new laser sensors to measure pollutants with unprecedented sensitivity.
Elephant hair could help cool the giants down, unlike the hair on all other known animals that helps keep them warm, researchers say.
The Health Grand Challenge (HC) is seeking proposals for innovative research and teaching initiatives that explore multidisciplinary aspects of global health and/or infectious disease.
A video game designed for predatory fish might have unraveled some lingering evolutionary questions about group formation and movement in animals.
What would Plato suggest we do to restore the earth’s health? Could Plato’s republic offer wisdom to help us save our planet?
A top scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has developed a model for predicting the outflow of heat during fusion experiments, which may help overcome a key barrier to the fusion process.
Drought is often the precursor to disaster, but getting leads on its stealthy approach through remote or war-torn areas can be so difficult that relief agencies sometimes have little time to react before a bad situation becomes a calamity.
For anyone looking for warnings about climate change, a good place to go would be just north of Las Vegas to Lake Mead.
By tricking live fish into attacking computer-generated "prey," scientists have learned that animals like birds and fish may indeed have evolved to swarm together to protect themselves from the threat of predators.
Most people would cringe at the idea of keeping an animal locked for years in a cage so cramped she couldn’t even turn around.
A skilled gardener can intuit how much water tomatoes and carrots need, but precisely quantifying a plant’s actual water use can be tricky.
Tropical storms in the Atlantic are likely to increase as the Earth’s climate warms in the first half of this century, but not for the reason that many people think.
Bacteria - including the MRSA superbug -may be more resistant to our most powerful antibiotics after a winter spurt of prescriptions, says a new study.
A new study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online shows how seasonal changes in outpatient antibiotic use – retail sales of antibiotics typically get a boost during the winter – can significantly alter seasonal patterns of drug resistance.
According to Iain Couzin, PEI associated faculty member, animals’ coordination and cooperation can teach us about human behavior — and even our voting patterns.
Scientists say that the catastrophic wildfires in the US West offer a preview of the kind of disasters that human-caused climate change could bring.
Taking their cue from the humble leaf, researchers have used microscopic folds on the surface of photovoltaic material to significantly increase the power output of flexible, low-cost solar cells.
Lin will join the civil and environmental engineering department on July 1, 2012.  She earned her Ph.D. from Princeton in 2010 and is now a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  She was a member of the Princeton and Energy Climate Scholars group from 2008 to 2010. 
Ask Andrew Bocarsly about the innovation behind Liquid Light, a New Jersey startup company that turns carbon dioxide into fuels and industrial chemicals.
On June 6th, Bess B. Ward, William J. Sinclair Professor of Geosciences, Department of Geosciences, Princeton University, was presented the 2012 Procter & Gamble Award in Applied and Environmental Microbiology.
Four graduate students have been awarded 2012 PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellowships by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
David Medvigy has released a study showing that day-to-day weather variations are growing more erratic and more extreme for at least one-third of the global climate.
National Geographic's Emerging Explorers Program recognizes and supports uniquely gifted and inspiring adventurers, scientists and storytellers, who are pushing the boundaries of discovery, adventure and global problem-solving.
Four Princeton University faculty members have been named recipients of the Graduate Mentoring Awards.
Understanding what changed at a million years B.C. could help climate scientists, like Michael Bender, better understand the climate system overall.
Established in 2009, the $25 million endowment fund supports the development of new technologies that have the potential to enable significant scientific and technological advances.
The National Academy of Sciences today announced the election of 84 new members and 21 foreign associates from 15 countries in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.
An expansion of hydropower planned for the Mekong River could have a catastrophic impact on the river's fishery and people who depend on it. Photo: P. Deetes/Creative Commons
Bonnie Bassler, the Squibb Professor of Molecular Biology, was inducted into the American Philosophical Society's biological sciences class.
Led by principal investigator Yueh-Lin (Lynn) Loo, researchers have used microscopic folds on the surface of photovoltaic material to significantly increase the power output of flexible, low-cost solar cells.
Survivors of Hurricane Katrina have struggled with poor mental health for years after the storm.
Sigman receives the 2012 European Association of Geochemistry (EAG) Science Innovation Award.
Issac Held receives the BBVA Foundation's "Frontiers of Knowledge Award" in the Climate Change Category.
Students in the seminar "Global Environmental Change: Science, Technology and Policy" are examining the issue of climate and sustainability through the lens of many disciplines.
Princeton researchers reported in Science that tropical savanna wildfires combined with climate conditions maintain the border between savannas and forests.
Yes, science is being distorted. But, much more dangerous, it is being rejected.
Craig Arnold has found a surprising link between battery life and the day-to-day physical forces acting on an overlooked battery component.
The study will be conducted by researchers at the Meadowlands Environmental Research Institute (MERI); Rutgers-Newark, led by Karina Schafer and Princeton University, led by PEI's Peter Jaffe.
Increasingly, many scientists are puzzling over how best to present what they know and don’t know to a broader audience.
Robert Socolow reflects on the need for the global community to find a new starting point for action on climate change.
Earthquakes have nothing to do with climate change — but nuclear power does.
A proposal from an interdisciplinary group of Princeton faculty has been selected by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) executive committee to become the first PIIRS research community to receive funding under an initiative announced earlier this year.
In the latest issue of Nature, Onstott and several colleagues announced the discovery of a creature one step up on the food chain from bacteria.
U.S. biologists, including PEI associated faculty members Daniel Rubenstein and Ian Couzin, worked with computer scientists to invent a scanner that can identify an individual zebra.
Lars Hedin, Director of the Program in Environmental Studies (ENV Program), charts a new course
Kelly Caylor, PEI associated faculty member, collaborates on a new project: “Coupling Hydrological Forecasts and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa and China.”
Jennifer Rexford, member of PEI associated faculty and Siebel Energy Challenge faculty, receives McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning Graduate Mentoring Award.
Technologies for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere unlikely to slow climate change in near term, according to American Physical Society study led by Robert Socolow.
This report is a review of the fish and fisheries section of the Feasibility Study (FS) and of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the Xayaburi hydropower project, with a particular focus on the fish passes proposed as an environmental impact mitigation measure.
Francois Morel, Albert G. Blanke, Jr., Professor of Geosciences and former director of PEI honored at award ceremony on March 29 at the 241st American Chemical Society national meeting.
"The middle class ... in the U.S. and other industrialized nations spend money on things we do not need. We could instead donate that money to organizations that make a huge difference in the lives of the world's poorest people."
Darren Samuelsohn reports that scientists and other advocates for acting on climate change are returning to a fight for public opinion they thought they'd won.
In the highly politicized world of climate science, public relations can win or lose battles that shape the Earth's future.
What precisely about warming is unequivocal: that it has been ocurring? That it will occur in the future? That the entire problem we call "global warming" is unequivocal in all aspects?
Negotiations this year are smaller and more subdued than last year's climate conference in Copenhagen, with fewer heads of government attending the meetings -- and far fewer protests. But some, like climate expert Michael Oppenheimer of Princeton University, say that less attention may translate to more progress on some important issues. In Copenhagen, expectations were raised so high that they obscured reality, he said.
Almost anywhere he looks, Princeton professor Craig Arnold sees energy. "Plants convert light to sugar -- this is chemical energy," Arnold told students in his freshman seminar on "Science and Technology for a Sustainable Future." "Cars take chemical energy and convert it to linear motion. We convert electrical energy into visible light by using a light bulb."
An interview with Emmanuel Kreike, associate professor of history, Princeton University.
The University of Cantabria has announced the award of a Honorary Doctor's Degree to Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe.
On Sept. 23, 2010, Michael Oppenheimer briefed the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, U.S. House of Representatives, on extreme weather in a warming world.
Various efforts are underway to find a cheap, efficient and scalable way to recycle the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide back into the hydrocarbons that fuel civilization
Tanzania's iconic national park must not be divided by a highway, say Andrew Dobson, Markus Borner, Tony Sinclair and 24 others. A route farther south would bring greater benefits to development and the environment.
Researchers at Princeton University are spearheading a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to study the risks and economics of capturing carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, and storing it underground.
Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation today announced the winners of the 16th annual Heinz Awards, honoring the contributions of 10 innovative and inspiring individuals whose work has addressed environmental challenges. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.
Princeton University researchers will participate in a $122 million research project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop technologies and educational programs to make buildings more energy efficient.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
This summer's work builds upon PEI's multiyear environmental monitoring program to help improve water quality and ecological balance.
Levin was chosen for his fundamental contributions in theoretical ecology and for his ground-breaking research on integrating different scales in understanding ecological processes.
Climate change's impacts on crop yields may force as many as seven million Mexicans to emigrate to the U.S. over the next 70 years, according to research published July 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has received the Keystone Award for Leadership in the Environment.
Two members of the Princeton University faculty have been recognized for major contributions to ecological research.
The oscillations during the past 2.5 million years between ice ages and interglacials were probably triggered by orbital changes, but the observed amplitude and timing of these climate cycles still awaits a full explanation. One notable correlation links lower partial pressure (or concentration) of CO2 with ice ages: changes in CO2 concentration may cause some of the ice-age cooling, but what causes the loss of CO2 is unknown. Daniel Sigman, Mathis Hain and Gerald Haug review the evidence in sup
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Without aggressive action to reduce soot emissions, the time table for carbon dioxide emission reductions may need to be significantly accelerated in order to achieve international climate policy goals such as those set forth in last December's Copenhagen Accord.
Two PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellows, Ning Lin and Luke MacDonald, graduated in June 2010 with Ph.D.s from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and in addition were awarded the Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
Since Israel’s deadly raid on the Turkish ship Mavi Marmara last month, it’s been assumed that Iran would be the major beneficiary of the wave of global anti-Israeli sentiment. But things seem to be playing out much differently: Iran paradoxically stands to lose much influence as Turkey assumes a surprising new role as the modern, democratic and internationally respected nation willing to take on Israel and oppose America.
When she teaches "Race and Medicine," Princeton professor Carolyn Rouse invites black students to leave class 10 minutes early. She explains that this time would be needed to make up for shorter life expectancy -- on average blacks live five to six years less than whites in the United States.
To understand why Himalayan glaciers are melting, Princeton Professor Denise Mauzerall looks for causes as far away as Europe and Africa.
As soon as it became clear that the Deepwater Horizon oil eruption was going to be gushing for a while, anyone with a basic understanding of regional ocean currents, from sea captains to oceanographers, began to wonder: what will happen if the oil gets into the Loop Current?
Despite the challenges and shortcomings, Bhutan's way of conserving the environment and wildlife is worth appreciating, according to participants attending an international conference in Bumthang on “Wildlife research techniques in rugged mountainous Asian landscape” which ended yesterday.
At PEI's class day in June, 44 students graduating with certificates in Environmental Studies gathered with faculty and family to celebrate.
This has been one of PEI's most enterprising years. We are pleased to share our exciting news with faculty, students, staff, alumni and friends.
In a collaboration melding art with science, climate researchers and other members of the Princeton University community joined forces with The Civilians to help create a work-in-progress about global climate change.
Using ENV 307as a foundation.
Serving audiences across the ocean.
Straining between remnants of the old paradigm and integration into the new.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
While exploring the Panama Canal in a small tourist boat, Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman were startled by a massive container ship suddenly passing by, rocking them violently in its wake. Painted on the hull in Chinese characters, its name was boldly inscribed as "The Great Immensity."
PEI Research and Center News from Spring/Summer 2010.
After the disaster the need skyrocketed, inspiring a team of Princeton researchers to launch a one-year effort to develop, deploy and test two novel disaster-relief technologies -- a rainwater harvester and filtration system, and a wind turbine for renewable energy production.
Princeton senior Ruth Metzel has been awarded the University's Henry Richardson Labouisse '26 Prize, which will fund her work with a nongovernmental organization to help address environmental issues in Panama.
Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, an environmental engineer and pioneer in the field of ecohydrology, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors in all areas of science.
Nine Princeton faculty members are among the 180 artists, scientists and scholars selected from a group of some 3,000 candidates for the 2010 Guggenheim Fellowships.
Burning plutonium and other fissile materials in nuclear reactors may be a good way to get rid of the dangerous materials.
Recently, an analysis of Essential Science IndicatorsSM from Thomson Reuters recognized the work of Dr. Lars Hedin as having the highest percent increase in total citations in the field of Environment & Ecology.
Freshman Sarah Bluher spent part of her spring break in the Florida Everglades collecting field samples from an airboat in a water conservation area.
An international group of scientists, ethicists, and governance experts meeting here this week has agreed that research into large-scale modification of the planet is "indispensable" given the "threats" posed by climate change.
A lot of scientists and conservationists find themselves questioning whether science got its due in the latest round of international negotiations on trade in endangered wildlife.
In order to be sure that agreed emissions reductions are taking place, the U.S. must deploy new monitoring technologies, according to a new report.
In its final and most powerful report, a U.N. panel of scientists meeting here describes the mounting risks of climate change in language that is both more specific and forceful than its previous assessments, according to scientists here.
Two professors and the entrepreneur in residence in Princeton's engineering school have been elected members of the National Academy of Engineering, a professional society whose members are among the world's most accomplished engineers.
Participants shared research findings in climate science, carbon capture and storage and policy from the past year and discussed prospects of future domestic and international climate policy.
If you want to save the planet, think for a minute about the simple plastic cup. Eight or 12 ounces, perhaps emblazoned with a Princeton logo — the University goes through thousands of them each month.
Effective Feb. 1, 2010, Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will assume the role of Director, Program in Environmental Studies (ENV) at Princeton Environmental Institute.
The recipients, Craig Arnold, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Lars Hedin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, will receive funding for projects that will be integrated teaching and research initiatives within the Siebel Energy Grand Challenge.
Rising acid levels in the world's oceans appear to be robbing the tiny animals that form the bedrock of the marine food web of a vital nutrient.
Since childhood, junior Jason Baum has been aware of environmental issues, switching off lights when leaving a room and turning off the water while brushing his teeth.
The failed terrorist attack on an American aeroplane by a Nigerian man trained by al Qa'eda in Yemen has rapidly focused the world's attention on the southern tip of the Arabian Peninsula.
Though experts may dispute the role of human activity in climate change, evidence is mounting that temperatures and sea levels are rising.
The Officers of the James S. McDonnell Foundation today announced more than $14 million in grants in their ongoing program, the 21st Century Science Initiative
At PEI we are approaching 2010 with a fresh sense of optimism. The Institute is strong and vital, as this issue of PEI News clearly illustrates.
Filling the ENV lab to capacity, students were eager to learn about the environmental studies program.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
When the more than 100 students completed internships this summer, they had at least one more commitment.
Regarding his plans for the Oil, Energy and Middle East Initiative, teaching and research.
Baker is in residence at PEI for the fall 2009 semester. A native of Texas, she is Director, Well Planning and Geotechnical Operations at BP.
On June 1, 2009, PEI held it's 15th annual Class Day celebration.
A summary of the University's many campus sustainability initiatives.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
Franz, a third year Ph.D. student was awarded a $10,000 grant to continue his research.
"Is Copenhagen the watershed or just another missed opportunity — there’s no way to tell yet," said Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton University climate scientist who attended the talks. 
The question is a potential deal-killer: If nations ever agree to slash greenhouse gas emissions, how will the world know if they live up to their pledges?
Global warming in this century might raise sea levels more than expected in future centuries, says a study that looked at what happened at a time when Neanderthals roamed Europe.
An additional 2 degrees of global warming could commit the planet to 6 to 9 meters (20 to 30 feet) of long-term sea level rise.
Hoping to help fix the Earth's atmosphere, Catherine Peters recently found herself 4,100 feet underground.
Margaret Martonosi, a Princeton professor of electrical engineering, has been named a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and of the IEEE, an international professional association for the advancement of technology.
How much good can this amount of aid do? How much would be enough if the industrialized nations can’t come to a climate change agreement? Should the United States throw in with this approach if it’s unlikely that Congress will approve any greenhouse gas reduction plan?
The climate problem is caused by prosperity.
If patterns of globalization over decades could be plotted on a world map, what might they look like and what deeper insights might they reveal, wondered Miguel Centeno.
Americans' day-to-day lives won't change noticeably if President Barack Obama achieves his newly announced goal of slashing carbon dioxide pollution by one-sixth in the next decade, experts say.
The online publication of sensitive e-mails and documents from a British climate centre is brewing into one of the scientific controversies of the year, causing dismay among affected institutes and individuals.
In its first report since adopting a Sustainability Plan in February 2008, Princeton University states that on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased for the first time since the University's energy-efficient cogeneration plant was installed in 1996.
When the more than 100 students who completed internships this summer through the Princeton Environmental Institute and the Grand Challenges Program returned to campus, they had at least one more commitment. As a culminating experience, they were required to report on what they learned during their experiences with faculty, research labs, governmental agencies, nongovernmental organizations, nonprofit organizations and industry enterprises in more than 20 countries. On two Fridays this fall,
Although al-Qaida's leadership, beliefs, and ideology are rooted in Saudi Arabia, the organisation has been all but crushed in the kingdom by a government policy that combines a big carrot and an even bigger stick. The attempted assassination in Jeddah last month of Prince Muhammad bin Nayef, the deputy interior minister for security affairs, demonstrates both elements of the Saudi strategy, and how a bold attempt by al-Qaida to revive its fortunes has failed.
Daniel Sigman, a Princeton University biogeochemist who has conducted pioneering work exploring the large-scale systems that have supported life on the planet throughout the millennia, has been selected as a 2009 MacArthur Fellow.
As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), Princeton University has received more than $17 million in research funding from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.
Filling the ENV lab to capacity, the enthusiastic students were eager to learn how to incorporate environmental studies into their undergraduate coursework.
After more than a decade of inquiry, a Princeton-led team of scientists has turned the tables on a long-standing controversy to re-establish an old truth about nitrogen mixing in the oceans.
Catherine Peters, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Acting Director of the Energy Grand Challenge program, is leading a university project to evaluate carbon storage, newly funded by the Department of Energy.
Emily Carter, the Arthur W. Marks '19 Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Applied and Computational Mathematics, has been elected a member of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science.
In his new book, "The Princeton Guide to Ecology," Princeton professor Simon Levin has tapped more than 130 experts to compile a concise, authoritative one-volume reference to the major subjects and concepts in ecology.
At the moment, the roof above Dormitory A of the redeveloped Butler College complex is a "green" roof only in the most technical sense of the phrase.
The new dormitories at Princeton University are already covered in green -- but not the traditional green ivy of the Ivy League.
The United States could meet projected growth in energy demand through 2030 with existing technologies, but the nation's long-term energy sustainability will require an enduring commitment, by both the public and private sectors, to developing, demonstrating and deploying new technologies and energy sources, according to a National Academy of Sciences committee chaired by Princeton Professor and President Emeritus Harold T. Shapiro.
Biofuels derived from renewable sources can be produced in large quantities and address many problems related to fossil fuels, including greenhouse gas emissions, but only if they are made from certain sources, according to a new article by a team of scientists and policy experts that included several Princeton researchers.
Princeton's Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, will receive the 2009 William Bowie Medal, the highest honor awarded by the American Geophysical Union.
Princeton University's Peter and Rosemary Grant, whose legendary explorations on the bleak Galapagos island of Daphne Major over nearly four decades have produced an array of dazzling insights into evolutionary theory, have been named recipients of the Kyoto Prize.
Deutsche Bank's Asset Management division (DeAM) today launched the world's first scientifically valid, real-time carbon counter, a nearly 70-foot-tall digital billboard displaying the running total of long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
Christina Paxson, a Princeton faculty member since 1986 who is the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Economics and Public Affairs and chair of the Department of Economics, has been selected as dean of the University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Her appointment is effective July 1.
Kelly Caylor, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been awarded a Faculty Early Career Development award from the National Science Foundation.
Robert Socolow, a Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will receive the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Frank Kreith Energy Award for his pioneering contributions in energy research. The award recognizes Socolow’s research on energy conservation, renewable energy and technologies to reduce CO2 emissions, which has influenced international policies on energy and the environment.
Robert Socolow, a Princeton professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, will receive the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Frank Kreith Energy Award for his pioneering contributions in energy research.
Princeton University will be home to a new $20 million energy research center for combustion science as part of a federal initiative to spur discoveries that lay the groundwork for an economy based on clean replacements for fossil fuels.
The second round of initiatives seeking to improve sustainability on Princeton's campus have been funded under the auspices of the University's Sustainability Plan.
For Trenton Franz, the one drawback to being a football star at the University of Wyoming -- he helped lead his team to its first bowl victory in 38 years -- was missing out on the chance to study abroad. His graduate work at Princeton has more than filled the gap. Working with civil engineering professors Michael Celia and Kelly Caylor, Franz studies the interactions among climate, water and vegetation in dryland ecosystems in central Kenya. By the time he earns his Ph.D., he will have spent
A team of researchers led by Princeton University scientists has found for the first time that tropical rainforests, a vital part of the Earth's ecosystem, rely on the rare trace element molybdenum to capture the nitrogen fertilizer needed to support their wildly productive growth.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
Ask Princeton ecologist David Wilcove about the largest threat to the greatest number of species in the next 25 years, and he'll give you a two-word answer. Global warming? No, oil palm.
Energy company BP has committed to a five-year renewal of a joint research partnership with Princeton University that identifies ways of tackling the world's climate problem.
An interdisciplinary group of scholars will examine the ethical dimensions of the challenge presented by climate change in a fall lecture series sponsored by the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the University Center for Human Values.
In one corridor, a faculty member was having an animated discussion on the future of the oil supply with two students. At a table, a Dining Services staff member was helping a local high school student with a project on recycling. Behind a bicycle that powered a light bulb, a student organization officer was signing up a new member.
A gift from Currie and Thomas A. Barron, a 1974 alumnus, offers new support for work at the intersection of environmental issues and the humanities at Princeton University.
As a venture capitalist, Paul Maeder recognizes that investing in new ideas can enable tremendous progress in the business arena.
You have to love nature, rising junior Stephanie Hill said, when you grow up, as she did, in a remote, pristine village on the shores of a glacier-fed lake in British Columbia.
President Shirley M. Tilghman comments on Princeton's focus on energy and the environment.
After a competitive review process, Princeton University's Cooperative Institute for Climate Science has been selected as a collaborative research partner by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).
Princeton ecologist Simon Levin, who has made major contributions in the areas of biological conservation and ecosystem management, has been selected as a foreign member of the Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, a venerable Italian academic institute.
If you were a zebra, how would you spend your days? Daniel Rubenstein, director of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Princeton University, has been pursuing this question for years.
A conference on environmental justice scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, April 28-29, will cap a yearlong collaboration between the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Center for African American Studies that has enabled Princeton students and scholars to thoroughly explore the topic.
In many ways, H. Vincent Poor, a 1977 graduate alumnus who became dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in June 2006, epitomizes Princeton's tradition of the teacher-scholar.
A new report should spur public debate about how science and technology can best sustain the earth while furthering the goals of humanity, according to Robert Socolow, one of 18 maverick thinkers convened by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) to map the greatest technological challenges of this century.
Snorkeling practice in DeNunzio Pool may be an unusual activity for a freshman seminar, unless the class is going to the Sargasso Sea.
David Wilcove, one of world's leading experts on endangered species, discusses his new book, No Way Home, which chronicles the decline of the world's animal migrations.
Scientists are developing a new branch of network theory to understand zebra communities.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Eleven Princeton faculty members have been involved in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 12.
Claire Kremen studies honeybees and the extinction of species. Saul Griffith is an inventor who is trying, among other things, to develop a process that will bring corrective eyewear to people in the Third World.
Princeton Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Fred Dryer has a lofty goal: end the nation's reliance on oil for jet travel.
Princeton faculty members have been invited to submit proposals by Monday, Sept. 17, for seed grants for projects under a new teaching and research program focused on important issues that share dominant environmental, political, social and engineering dimensions
The earth is growing warmer, thanks to elevated concentrations of greenhouse gases, and the vast majority of scientists now believe that human activity, especially the burning of fossil fuels, is primarily responsible.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
David Wilcove, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Public Affairs, has been named a recipient of the 2011 Pioneers of Science Award.
PEI Professor François M.M. Morel has received the Einstein Chair Professorship from the Institute of Urban Environment (IUE), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).
Researchers from Princeton, in partnership with other scientists, are launching a research project that will ultimately help improve the livelihoods of pastoralists in the Horn of Africa region.
For the second consecutive year since adopting a Sustainability Plan, Princeton University's on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased.
On his blog "Dot Earth," Andrew Revkin discusses "Wedges Reaffirmed," an article written by PEI's Robert Socolow and published by The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists and Climate Central.
David Wilcove has been named a 2011 Pioneers of Science Award recipient by the Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute (HWI).
While Emily Carter was in Germany this week accepting an award from the German Chemical Society, she gave this lecture.
A network of dashboard-mounted phones can collect data on traffic lights and tell drivers how to avoid inefficient stopping and starting.
China, India and Saudi Arabia are trying to secure their food supply by leasing water-rich African land. Doing so is cheaper and easier than using water resources back home, but it could backfire.
Animal species all follow the same rule for how common they are in an ecosystem, scientists have discovered. And the rule is simple.
Have Chinese Coal Plants Been Keeping Global Warming in Check? It all sounds logical, and, says Hiram Levy,"the idea is physically sound." But he's not convinced that this is what's really happening.