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PEI faculty member Michael Oppenheimer discusses U.S.- China climate change agreement during PBS NewsHour.
Although scenes of people fleeing from dramatic displays of Mother Nature’s power dominate the news, gradual increases in an area’s overall temperature actually lead more often to permanent population shifts.
Princeton University's Michael Oppenheimer was one of four scientists who testified on May 29th before the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology about the need for greater transparency.
A Princeton University Grand Challenges research team has created a model to evaluate how a human response to climate change may alter the agricultural utility of land.
Michael Oppenheimer, geoscientist and PEI associated faculty member, discusses the first of three reports to be released by the IPPC on their fifth assessment of global warming.
Climate scientists are surer than ever that human activity is causing global warming, according to leaked drafts of a major UN report, but they are finding it harder than expected to predict the impact in specific regions in coming decades.
The damage scientists expect climate change to do to crop yields can differ greatly depending on which type of model was used to make those projections, according to research based at Princeton University.
Michael Oppenheimer is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Geosciences and International Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the Department of Geosciences at Princeton University. He is the Director of the Program in Science,Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) at the Woodrow Wilson School and Faculty Associate of the Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences Program, Princeton Environmental Institute, and The Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies.
In two recent papers in the journals Nature Climate Change and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the researchers present a probabilistic assessment of the Antarctic contribution to twenty-first century sea-level change. A Princeton University release reports that their methodology folds observed changes and models of different complexity into unified projections that can be updated with new information. This approach provides a consistent means to integrate the potentia
Four Princeton University researchers took part in the June 11 report, "A Stronger, More Resilient New York," a comprehensive analysis of New York City's climate risks and proposed steps for preparing for future climate events.
In recent years, according to the authors, our understanding of the relationship between climate and extreme weather has sharpened, along with our appreciation of the vast damages such events cause.
Research outcomes from Princeton Environmental Institute’s Carbon Mitigation Initiative help advance a probabilistic assessment of the Antarctic contribution to 21st-century sea-level change.
PEI Associated faculty and others at Princeton have been studying extreme weather, natural disasters, and their impact on people and property for years, but Hurricane Sandy pushed their research to the forefront.
A recent study coauthored by professor Michael Oppenheimer indicates that available evidence suggests that scientist have been conservative in their projections of climate change impacts.
An enhanced approach to capturing changes on the Earth's surface via satellite could provide a more accurate account of how ice sheets, river basins and other geographic areas are changing and why.
Michael Oppenheimer, from Princeton University, and other climate scientists combined models that project broad climate changes decades into the future.
Superstorm Sandy is a sign of more things to come, says Michael Oppenheimer, a climate scientist at Princeton University.
Scientists say that the catastrophic wildfires in the US West offer a preview of the kind of disasters that human-caused climate change could bring.
Princeton University has one of the most extensive and capable investments in climate science of any institution, suggests Stephen Pacala.
A study conducted by Princeton University researchers Michael Oppenheimer and Erik Vanmarcke with MIT researchers Ning Lin and Kerry Emanuel reported N.Y. may be at risk of increased storm-surge flooding.
Increasingly, many scientists are puzzling over how best to present what they know and don’t know to a broader audience.
A proposal from an interdisciplinary group of Princeton faculty has been selected by the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies (PIIRS) executive committee to become the first PIIRS research community to receive funding under an initiative announced earlier this year.
Darren Samuelsohn reports that scientists and other advocates for acting on climate change are returning to a fight for public opinion they thought they'd won.
In the highly politicized world of climate science, public relations can win or lose battles that shape the Earth's future.
What precisely about warming is unequivocal: that it has been ocurring? That it will occur in the future? That the entire problem we call "global warming" is unequivocal in all aspects?
Negotiations this year are smaller and more subdued than last year's climate conference in Copenhagen, with fewer heads of government attending the meetings -- and far fewer protests. But some, like climate expert Michael Oppenheimer of Princeton University, say that less attention may translate to more progress on some important issues. In Copenhagen, expectations were raised so high that they obscured reality, he said.
On Sept. 23, 2010, Michael Oppenheimer briefed the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, U.S. House of Representatives, on extreme weather in a warming world.
Teresa Heinz and the Heinz Family Foundation today announced the winners of the 16th annual Heinz Awards, honoring the contributions of 10 innovative and inspiring individuals whose work has addressed environmental challenges. Each recipient receives an unrestricted cash prize of $100,000.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
Climate change's impacts on crop yields may force as many as seven million Mexicans to emigrate to the U.S. over the next 70 years, according to research published July 26 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Climate change is expected to cause mass human migration, including immigration across international borders.
Two PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellows, Ning Lin and Luke MacDonald, graduated in June 2010 with Ph.D.s from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and in addition were awarded the Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
To understand why Himalayan glaciers are melting, Princeton Professor Denise Mauzerall looks for causes as far away as Europe and Africa.
In a collaboration melding art with science, climate researchers and other members of the Princeton University community joined forces with The Civilians to help create a work-in-progress about global climate change.
While exploring the Panama Canal in a small tourist boat, Steve Cosson and Michael Friedman were startled by a massive container ship suddenly passing by, rocking them violently in its wake. Painted on the hull in Chinese characters, its name was boldly inscribed as "The Great Immensity."
PEI Research and Center News from Spring/Summer 2010.
In its final and most powerful report, a U.N. panel of scientists meeting here describes the mounting risks of climate change in language that is both more specific and forceful than its previous assessments, according to scientists here.
A summary of the University's many campus sustainability initiatives.
"Is Copenhagen the watershed or just another missed opportunity — there’s no way to tell yet," said Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton University climate scientist who attended the talks. 
Global warming in this century might raise sea levels more than expected in future centuries, says a study that looked at what happened at a time when Neanderthals roamed Europe.
An additional 2 degrees of global warming could commit the planet to 6 to 9 meters (20 to 30 feet) of long-term sea level rise.
How much good can this amount of aid do? How much would be enough if the industrialized nations can’t come to a climate change agreement? Should the United States throw in with this approach if it’s unlikely that Congress will approve any greenhouse gas reduction plan?
Americans' day-to-day lives won't change noticeably if President Barack Obama achieves his newly announced goal of slashing carbon dioxide pollution by one-sixth in the next decade, experts say.
The online publication of sensitive e-mails and documents from a British climate centre is brewing into one of the scientific controversies of the year, causing dismay among affected institutes and individuals.
Grand Challenges collaborations focus on development, energy, health solutions.
Eleven Princeton faculty members have been involved in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that was awarded the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 12.
The paper Climate change: helping nature survive the human response, published in the scientific journal Conservation Letters, looks at efforts to both reduce emissions of greenhouse gases and potential action that could be taken by people to adapt to a changed climate and assesses the potential impact that these could have on global ecosystems.
Oppenheimer defines CO2, methane, and infrared radiation and how they contribute to global warming.
Delivering the first of the Sydney Ideas lectures for 2010, world renowned climate scientist Michael Oppenheimer outlined the evidence for global warming and explained how it was gathered.