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Princeton researchers supported by the Grand Challenges Program have found, overall, water availability has increased in African maize-growing regions, with exceptions in parts of East Africa.
Leaders from industry and academia met recently at Princeton University to discuss three big questions surrounding the broad theme of "water": infrastructure, the water/energy nexus, and industrial water.
Princeton University researchers found that as water freezes it takes on a sort of split personality wherein, at very cold temperatures and above a certain pressure, it may split into two liquid forms.
On Friday, May 9th, the Princeton Environmental Institute hosted its annual Discovery Day—a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on environmental topics.
Princeton University is seeking outstanding applications to fill a new tenure-track faculty position in water science.
Civil and environmental engineering professor Eric Wood and his research team have developed a drought monitoring and forecast system for sub-Saharan Africa.
"The River of Muddy Water," looks at the many challenges to water security in Kenya by examining the confluence of Maasai farmers who rely on the Ewaso Ng'iro river for virtually all their water needs.
Last summer, the Princeton chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB-PU) traveled to La Pitajaya, Peru, to construct the first phase of a potable water system.
A study of sed­i­ment cores col­lected from the deep ocean sup­ports a new expla­na­tion for how glac­ier melt­ing at the end of the ice ages led to the release of car­bon diox­ide from the ocean.
Researchers used hydrological and climate change models to predict how much water would likely be available for use in growing crops around the world.
The Clean Water Act has been a success, but it's out-of-date and producing diminishing returns. George Hawkins discusses how it can be modernized.
Instructors: Eric Larson, a research engineer with the Energy Systems Analysis Group of the Princeton Environmental Instituteand lecturer in chemical and biological engineering and inmechanical and aerospace engineering; Sankaran Sundaresan, professor of chemical and biological engineering; and Daniel Giammar, the William R. Kenan Jr. Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching in Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment (on leave from Washing
A series of recent droughts from Australia to the United States has led some scientists to warn that global warming has already begun to increase worldwide drought.
A new study that modeled the impact of climate change on more than 600 fish species says that most of those species could shrink by between 14 and 24 percent by the year 2050.
Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor, Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, and graduate student, Carole Dalin, are studying the delicate balance between trade in food and trade in water.
Pablo Debenedetti studies water at the smallest possible scales — zooming in on molecule-to-molecule interactions — but the implications for large industrial processes and many scientific fields could hardly be greater.
Drought is often the precursor to disaster, but getting leads on its stealthy approach through remote or war-torn areas can be so difficult that relief agencies sometimes have little time to react before a bad situation becomes a calamity.
For anyone looking for warnings about climate change, a good place to go would be just north of Las Vegas to Lake Mead.
A skilled gardener can intuit how much water tomatoes and carrots need, but precisely quantifying a plant’s actual water use can be tricky.
Tropical storms in the Atlantic are likely to increase as the Earth’s climate warms in the first half of this century, but not for the reason that many people think.
Princeton students were in Peru to scout the area for their newest project: building a pipeline to bring drinking water to La Pitajaya's 150 residents.
An expansion of hydropower planned for the Mekong River could have a catastrophic impact on the river's fishery and people who depend on it. Photo: P. Deetes/Creative Commons
On April 24 DC Water General Manager George S. Hawkins,who teaches "Enviromental Law and Moot Court", received the National Environmental Achievement Award from NACWA.
Survivors of Hurricane Katrina have struggled with poor mental health for years after the storm.
Students in the seminar "Global Environmental Change: Science, Technology and Policy" are examining the issue of climate and sustainability through the lens of many disciplines.
Kelly Caylor, PEI associated faculty member, collaborates on a new project: “Coupling Hydrological Forecasts and Food Security in Sub-Saharan Africa and China.”
PEI Visiting Professor George Hawkins '83 promotes sustainability as head of The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority.
This course is an introduction to the study of environmental systems. Students will use quantitative analysis to examine three of today's most pressing issues: energy, water, and food.
On Sept. 23, 2010, Michael Oppenheimer briefed the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming, U.S. House of Representatives, on extreme weather in a warming world.
Tanzania's iconic national park must not be divided by a highway, say Andrew Dobson, Markus Borner, Tony Sinclair and 24 others. A route farther south would bring greater benefits to development and the environment.
This summer's work builds upon PEI's multiyear environmental monitoring program to help improve water quality and ecological balance.
The oscillations during the past 2.5 million years between ice ages and interglacials were probably triggered by orbital changes, but the observed amplitude and timing of these climate cycles still awaits a full explanation. One notable correlation links lower partial pressure (or concentration) of CO2 with ice ages: changes in CO2 concentration may cause some of the ice-age cooling, but what causes the loss of CO2 is unknown. Daniel Sigman, Mathis Hain and Gerald Haug review the evidence in sup
Without aggressive action to reduce soot emissions, the time table for carbon dioxide emission reductions may need to be significantly accelerated in order to achieve international climate policy goals such as those set forth in last December's Copenhagen Accord.
Two PEI-STEP Environmental Policy Fellows, Ning Lin and Luke MacDonald, graduated in June 2010 with Ph.D.s from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and in addition were awarded the Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy (STEP) from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
When she teaches "Race and Medicine," Princeton professor Carolyn Rouse invites black students to leave class 10 minutes early. She explains that this time would be needed to make up for shorter life expectancy -- on average blacks live five to six years less than whites in the United States.
To understand why Himalayan glaciers are melting, Princeton Professor Denise Mauzerall looks for causes as far away as Europe and Africa.
The recipients include: Kevin Loutherback, Electrical Engineering; Dalin Shi, Geosciences; and Ann Carla Staver, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology.
Esmann will be recognized for co-founding Global Minimum, a nongovernmental organization (NGO) that has undertaken numerous projects in Sierra Leone aimed at combating the spread of malaria while promoting development in the country.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
Learn more about Smith's semester as a BP-Vann Fellow and the course he is teaching.
After the disaster the need skyrocketed, inspiring a team of Princeton researchers to launch a one-year effort to develop, deploy and test two novel disaster-relief technologies -- a rainwater harvester and filtration system, and a wind turbine for renewable energy production.
Brain workers like to live near each other. It is easier to keep up with the latest ideas if you keep bumping into other people who work in the same field.
Princeton in Africa has expanded significantly over the last decade, and many of its graduates have remained involved with issues in Africa.
Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, an environmental engineer and pioneer in the field of ecohydrology, has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors in all areas of science.
Recently, an analysis of Essential Science IndicatorsSM from Thomson Reuters recognized the work of Dr. Lars Hedin as having the highest percent increase in total citations in the field of Environment & Ecology.
Freshman Sarah Bluher spent part of her spring break in the Florida Everglades collecting field samples from an airboat in a water conservation area.
Though experts may dispute the role of human activity in climate change, evidence is mounting that temperatures and sea levels are rising.
The Gulf region relies upon foreign sources for 60% of its food supply. Agriculture in this region is declining.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
Franz, a third year Ph.D. student was awarded a $10,000 grant to continue his research.
At the moment, the roof above Dormitory A of the redeveloped Butler College complex is a "green" roof only in the most technical sense of the phrase.
The new dormitories at Princeton University are already covered in green -- but not the traditional green ivy of the Ivy League.
Princeton's Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, will receive the 2009 William Bowie Medal, the highest honor awarded by the American Geophysical Union.
Kelly Caylor, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been awarded a Faculty Early Career Development award from the National Science Foundation.
The second round of initiatives seeking to improve sustainability on Princeton's campus have been funded under the auspices of the University's Sustainability Plan.
For Trenton Franz, the one drawback to being a football star at the University of Wyoming -- he helped lead his team to its first bowl victory in 38 years -- was missing out on the chance to study abroad. His graduate work at Princeton has more than filled the gap. Working with civil engineering professors Michael Celia and Kelly Caylor, Franz studies the interactions among climate, water and vegetation in dryland ecosystems in central Kenya. By the time he earns his Ph.D., he will have spent
The project incorporates many sustainability features, including green roofs on more than half of the buildings.
In one corridor, a faculty member was having an animated discussion on the future of the oil supply with two students. At a table, a Dining Services staff member was helping a local high school student with a project on recycling. Behind a bicycle that powered a light bulb, a student organization officer was signing up a new member.
You have to love nature, rising junior Stephanie Hill said, when you grow up, as she did, in a remote, pristine village on the shores of a glacier-fed lake in British Columbia.
The first round of initiatives has been funded under the auspices of the research, education and civic engagement section of the University's new Sustainability Plan.
Princeton researchers have invented a method for turning simple data about rainfall and river networks into accurate assessments of fish biodiversity, allowing better prediction of the effects of climate change and the ecological impact of man-made structures like dams.
Ignacio Rodríguez-Iturbe, the James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been named a member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.
Several days into their spring break, 14 Princeton students found themselves in the middle of the Arizona desert, with nighttime temperatures in the 30s and no running water or electricity.
Humanity can't go on like this. Earth's climate is shifting, and it is all but certainly civilization's fault for burning fossil fuels and spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.
Researchers from Princeton, in partnership with other scientists, are launching a research project that will ultimately help improve the livelihoods of pastoralists in the Horn of Africa region.
For the second consecutive year since adopting a Sustainability Plan, Princeton University's on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased.
China, India and Saudi Arabia are trying to secure their food supply by leasing water-rich African land. Doing so is cheaper and easier than using water resources back home, but it could backfire.