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Archive – November 2009

If patterns of globalization over decades could be plotted on a world map, what might they look like and what deeper insights might they reveal, wondered Miguel Centeno.
Americans' day-to-day lives won't change noticeably if President Barack Obama achieves his newly announced goal of slashing carbon dioxide pollution by one-sixth in the next decade, experts say.
The online publication of sensitive e-mails and documents from a British climate centre is brewing into one of the scientific controversies of the year, causing dismay among affected institutes and individuals.
Although the very term "accounting rules" may cause most people to turn the page, the financial crisis has shown that when rules allow businesses to claim profits from what are actually losses, they distort economic incentives at our peril.
Barmeier is among the 32 American college students who won the prestigious fellowships, which fund two or three years of study in England.
Natural ecosystems and biodiversity must be made a bulwark against climate change, not a casualty of it, argue Will R. Turner, Michael Oppenheimer and David S. Wilcove.
CMI's "One Billion High Emitters" research makes Time Magazine's 50 Best Inventions of 2009.
In its first report since adopting a Sustainability Plan in February 2008, Princeton University states that on-campus greenhouse gas emissions have decreased for the first time since the University's energy-efficient cogeneration plant was installed in 1996.
In the fall of 2009, the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI) and the Lewis Center for the Arts initiated a yearlong collaborative project lying at the intersection of the environment and the performing arts.