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Archive – December 2009

At PEI we are approaching 2010 with a fresh sense of optimism. The Institute is strong and vital, as this issue of PEI News clearly illustrates.
Filling the ENV lab to capacity, students were eager to learn about the environmental studies program.
The Gulf region relies upon foreign sources for 60% of its food supply. Agriculture in this region is declining.
Now in its third year of funding, the Grand Challenges Initiative, administered by PEI in collaboration with the Woodrow Wilson School and the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has created a diverse research and scholarship endeavor.
When the more than 100 students completed internships this summer, they had at least one more commitment.
Regarding his plans for the Oil, Energy and Middle East Initiative, teaching and research.
Baker is in residence at PEI for the fall 2009 semester. A native of Texas, she is Director, Well Planning and Geotechnical Operations at BP.
On June 1, 2009, PEI held it's 15th annual Class Day celebration.
A summary of the University's many campus sustainability initiatives.
PEI Research and Centers News from Fall/Winter 2009.
Franz, a third year Ph.D. student was awarded a $10,000 grant to continue his research.
"Is Copenhagen the watershed or just another missed opportunity — there’s no way to tell yet," said Michael Oppenheimer, a Princeton University climate scientist who attended the talks. 
The question is a potential deal-killer: If nations ever agree to slash greenhouse gas emissions, how will the world know if they live up to their pledges?
Remarks by Simon Levin, professor at Princeton University and a Dec. 2009 honorary degree recipient at commencement at Michigan State University. Video by Alberto Moreno and Jim Peck, University Relations, Michigan State University.
Global warming in this century might raise sea levels more than expected in future centuries, says a study that looked at what happened at a time when Neanderthals roamed Europe.
An additional 2 degrees of global warming could commit the planet to 6 to 9 meters (20 to 30 feet) of long-term sea level rise.
Hoping to help fix the Earth's atmosphere, Catherine Peters recently found herself 4,100 feet underground.
Margaret Martonosi, a Princeton professor of electrical engineering, has been named a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and of the IEEE, an international professional association for the advancement of technology.
How much good can this amount of aid do? How much would be enough if the industrialized nations can’t come to a climate change agreement? Should the United States throw in with this approach if it’s unlikely that Congress will approve any greenhouse gas reduction plan?
The climate problem is caused by prosperity.