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Archive – September 2013

Michael Oppenheimer, geoscientist and PEI associated faculty member, discusses the first of three reports to be released by the IPPC on their fifth assessment of global warming.
A Princeton University-based study funded by the Carbon Mitigation Initiative found that a unique dynamic between trees and carbo-loading rhizobia bacteria may determine how well tropical forests absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
New research by geosciences professor Daniel Sigman and colleagues indicates that the cyclic wobble of the Earth on its axis controls the production of a nutrient essential to the health of the ocean.
Scientists expect climate change and warmer oceans to push the fish that people rely on for food and income into new territory. Results of new research based at Princeton University is reported in the journal Science.
In the Summer of 2013, 73 Princeton undergraduates affiliated with the Princeton Environmental Institute held 8-12 week environmental assignments with faculty-led research projects and as interns with NGOs, government, industry, and academic enterprises in 12 foreign countries and 5 U.S. states and the District of Columbia.
Princeton geosciences professor Michael Bender, an internationally recognized authority on paleoclimate, provides a concise, comprehensive, and sophisticated introduction to the subject.
Each summer, select K-12 science teachers from New Jersey become the students as part of the QUEST (Questioning Underlies Effective Science Teaching) program run by Princeton University's Program in Teacher Preparation. The teachers spend a week with university-level researchers in the lab experimenting, or in the field observing and collecting evidence for self-designed research projects. And the point is to always ask questions. This summer QUEST included a program based at the state-owned Lig