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Grand Challenges News

Princeton researchers Lyndon Estes and Tim Searchinger discuss the potential for effective smart agriculture in Africa’s savannas.
Ten graduate students have been selected to join the Princeton Energy and Climate Scholars Program (PECS) for the 2015-2016 academic year.
In the virtual world of climate modeling, forests and other vegetation are assumed to quickly bounce back from extreme drought and resume their integral role in removing carbon dioxide from Earth's atmosphere.
On Saturday July 11, roughly 300 school children and community members convened for the annual Community Conservation Day in the Laikipia district of Northern Kenya.
The students were all members of the Northern Kenya Conservation Clubs. The Princeton University Development Challenge managed by the Princeton Environmental Institute supported after-school clubs at eleven schools in Laikipia with the aim of instilling students with ecological awareness and a conservation ethic through experi
Phil Hannam, former Princeton Energy and Climate Scholar, writes about China's emergence as a key partner in India’s coal power development, and the broad implications for India’s climate change strategy.
On Friday, May 8th, the Princeton Environmental Institute hosted its annual Discovery Day—a multidisciplinary poster session celebrating undergraduate senior thesis research on environmental issues. Over 50 students from 16 academic departments showcased their work which was mentored by 34 faculty advisers.
Discovery Day is a culminating event for students participating in the Program in Environmental Studies and for students receiving field research support from PEI and the Grand Challen
Termites can keep desertification at bay by adding nutrients and helping water infiltrate soil, but the vegetation patterns that result can be confusing.
A team of researchers has found that greenhouse gasses a million years ago were only slightly higher than they were between 450,000 and 800,000 years ago.
The Carbon Mitigation Initiative (CMI) held its 14th annual meeting at Princeton University on April 14 and 15, 2015. More than 100 participants gathered to discuss CMI’s most recent initiatives in the areas of science, technology, and integration and outreach.
Robert Pringle, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was named one of nine Early Career Fellows nationwide by the Ecological Society of America (ESA). Fellows are elected by ESA members, and the five-year fellowships recognize early-career researchers for their contributions and potential contributions to ecology.