1:11 New Jersey Conscientious Employee Protection Act

Whistleblower Act

The New Jersey Conscientious Employee Protection Act addresses employer retaliatory action; protected employee actions; employee responsibilities. Individuals can review the notice issued by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development in English or Spanish.

New Jersey law prohibits an employer from taking any retaliatory action against an employee because the employee does any of the following:
  1. Discloses, or threatens to disclose, to a supervisor or to a public body an activity, policy or practice of the employer or another employer, with whom there is a business relationship, that the employee reasonably believes is in violation of a law, or a rule or regulation issued under the law, or, in the case of an employee who is a licensed or certified health care professional, reasonably believes constitutes improper quality of patient care;
  2. Provides information to, or testifies before, any public body conducting an investigation, hearing or inquiry into any violation of law, or a rule or regulation issued under the law by the employer or another employer, with whom there is a business relationship, or, in the case of an employee who is a licensed or certified health care professional, provides information to, or testifies before any public body conducting an investigation, hearing or inquiry into quality of patient care; or
  3. Objects to, or refuses to participate in, any activity, policy or practice which the employee reasonably believes:
    • Is in violation of a law, or a rule or regulation issued under the law or, if the employee is a licensed or certified health care professional, constitutes improper quality of patient care;  
    • Is fraudulent or criminal; or
    • Is incompatible with a clear mandate of public policy concerning the public health, safety or welfare or protection of the environment. N.J.S.A. 34:19-3.

The protection against retaliation, when a disclosure is made to a public body, does not apply unless the employee has brought the activity, policy or practice to the attention of a supervisor of the employee by written notice and given the employer a reasonable opportunity to correct the activity, policy or practice. However, disclosure is not required where the employee reasonably believes that the activity, policy or practice is known to one or more supervisors of the employer or where the employee fears physical harm as a result of the disclosure, provided that the situation is emergency in nature.

A one year statue of limitations applies to claims made under CEPA

Contact Information 

The following contact persons have been designated to answer your questions or provide information regarding your rights and responsibilities under this act (N.J.S.A. 34:19-4):

Human Resources Staff

Pierre Joanis, Director of Client Services
2 New South Building, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544
258-8641
  
The above information is a summary only and is in no way intended to be legal advice. Furthermore, this should be read in concert with University policies and procedures. Requests for additional information should be directed to your senior HR manager .