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Integrated Science in the News

Krysta Dummit and Daniel Mossing named Goldwater Scholars

Two Integrated Science Princeton students have been awarded Goldwater Scholarships, the premier award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering.

The 2013-14 winners are juniors Krysta Dummit, a chemistry major, and Daniel Mossing, a physics major. Dummit is from Shelburne, Vt., and Mossing is from Oxford, Miss.

One- and two-year Goldwater Scholarships cover tuition, fees, room and board up to a maximum of $7,500 per year. The Princeton recipients are among 283 scholarship winners selected from a field of 1,166 students nationwide.

The scholarship program honoring Sen. Barry Goldwater was created as part of the Goldwater Foundation, a federally endowed agency created by an act of Congress in 1986. Recent Goldwater Scholars have been awarded 80 Rhodes Scholarships, 117 Marshall Awards, 112 Churchill Scholarships and numerous other distinguished fellowships.

LSI researchers and university undergraduates collaborate on Genetics paper


August 15, 2013 - A group of Lewis-Sigler Institute researchers have joined with university undergraduates to publish "A New System for Comparative Functional Genomics of Saccharomyces Yeasts" in the journal Genetics. With genome sequencing in humans and other organisms quickly becoming easier and cheaper, the next big challenge for biology is to translate genome sequences into gene functions. The researchers tackled this problem in a novel way by harnessing the power of undergraduate researchers.
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Krysta Dummit '15 receives Freshman First Honor Prize

September 2012 - Krysta Dummit ‘15, a student in the Institute’s Integrated Science Curriculum, received the Freshman First Honor Prize at the University’s Opening Exercises on Sunday, September 9. The prize is awarded each year to a sophomore in recognition of exceptional academic achievement during freshman year. Dummit worked in the laboratory of Institute Director David Botstein during the summer, analyzing genomic data. (Read more.)

Dummit and Owen receive Manfred Pyka Memorial Prize in Physics

Sept. 2012 - Two Integrated Science students, Krysta Dummit '15 and Gregory Owen '15, are the recipients of a Manfred Pyka Memorial Prize in Physics, given to outstanding Physics undergraduates who have shown excellence in course work and promise in independent research. 

James Valcourt '12 named Pyne Prize winner

February 2012 - Princeton senior James Valcourt, a candidate for the Certificate in Quantitative and Computational Biology, has been named co-winner, with Ann-Marie Elvin, of the University's 2012 Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize, the highest general distinction conferred on an undergraduate.

Christina M. Chang ‘12 Awarded Iota Sigma Pi Gladys Anderson Emerson Scholarship

April 2011 - Christina Marie Chang, Class of 2012, has been selected as the Gladys Anderson Emerson Scholarship recipient for 2011 by Iota Sigma Pi. The award recognizes excellence in chemistry or biochemistry at the junior undergraduate level. Chang, a major in the Chemistry Department at Princeton University, is pursuing research in the laboratory of Professor John T. Groves. 

Cameron Myhrvold '11 receives Hertz Foundation Fellowship

March 31, 2011 - Cameron Myhrvold, a Quantitative and Computational Biology Certificate student, is one of two Princeton seniors who have been awarded a prestigious Hertz Foundation fellowship for graduate studies. The Molecular Biology major has been studying quorum sensing, the chemical communication between bacteria, in the laboratory of Bonnie Bassler. He started his undergraduate studies in the Institute’s Integrated Science curriculum, and plans to use his $250,000 no-strings-attached award either in the Systems Biology Ph.D. Program at Harvard University or the Department of Biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Christina Chang '12 awarded Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship

March 2011 - Christina Chang ’12, who was part of the Integrated Science program during her freshman and sophomore years, is one of four Princeton Undergraduates awarded a coveted Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship. She is majoring in Chemistry with a minor in Computer Science, and is conducting research in bioinorganic chemistry in John Groves’ Lab, studying manganese porphyrin catalysts. After graduation, she plans to go to graduate school to work on artificial photosynthetic systems, and hopes to use ideas from nature to provide technical solutions to the energy crisis, and to teach at the university level.
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Integrated Science pays off for Graduates

October 12, 2009 - The integrated science curriculum, now in its sixth year, continues to attract students with an interest in pursuing graduate programs and careers in the sciences. Through its notoriously difficult multidisciplinary program of courses, the curriculum arms graduates to work at the cutting edge of many fields, said students, professors and alumni.
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Testing the boundaries of teaching science

March 12, 2007 — Some of Princeton’s most scientifically talented undergraduates are dedicating their years on campus to more than learning how to conduct experiments. They have elected to be part of a grand experiment themselves — one that is attracting attention nationwide.
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Mixing It Up -New courses combine multiple disciplines in single classroom

Princeton's Integrated Science Curriculum is featured in a July 17, 2006 article in Chemical & Engineering News.  "Science is becoming more and more an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary pursuit," it states, "but students usually learn each subject in isolation. Recently developed courses at three universities buck this trend and show that it is possible to teach science in an integrated fashion to both science majors and nonscience majors."

Four faculty members recognized for outstanding teaching

June 6, 2006 — Four Princeton faculty members received President's Awards for Distinguished Teaching at Commencement ceremonies June 6. They are: William Bialek, the John Archibald Wheeler/Battelle Professor in Physics; Joel Cooper, professor of psychology; William Gleason, associate professor of English; and Sankaran (Sundar) Sundaresan, professor of chemical engineering. . . . Bialek, who joined the Princeton faculty in 2001, also is a member of the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics. He is one of the architects of the new integrated science curriculum for undergraduates, which involves faculty from chemistry, computer science, molecular biology and physics. In addition, he co-teaches the introductory course in that curriculum and leads a graduate-level biophysics class.
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Curtis Huttenhower receives an Association of Princeton Graduate Alumni (APGA) Teaching Award

May 18, 2006 – Curtis Huttenhower, a Department of Computer Science Graduate Student in Institute faculty member Olga Troyanskaya's lab, has been awarded an Association of Princeton Graduate Alumni (APGA) Teaching Award for his work as an Assistant in Instruction for CHM/COS/MOL/PHY 231-234, the freshman integrated science course organized by the Institute. The APGA and the Friends of the International Center fund a competition each year to recognize and honor those graduate students who have made a significant contribution to undergraduate teaching. Mr Hibbs was nominated by his department, supported by his students and, along with four other AIs, chosen by the Teaching Award Selection Committee for this distinction.

Mapping the path of genetics

Oct. 18, 2005 — Twenty-seven years ago, in a resort town high in Utah's Wasatch Mountains, David Botstein had a simple idea that would change the course of genetics. Botstein, then a professor at MIT, was in town for an informal meeting of University of Utah researchers. Listening to a graduate student discuss genetic markers of disease, he had a striking thought.
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Matthew Hibbs receives an Association of Princeton Graduate Alumni (APGA) Teaching Award

May 10, 2005 - Matthew Hibbs, a Department of Computer Science Graduate Student in Institute faculty member Olga Troyanskaya's lab, has been awarded an Association of Princeton Graduate Alumni (APGA) Teaching Award for his work as an Assistant in Instruction for CHM/COS/MOL/PHY 231-234, the new freshman integrated science course organized by the Institute. The APGA and the Friends of the International Center fund a competition each year to recognize and honor those graduate students who have made a significant contribution to undergraduate teaching. Mr Hibbs was nominated by his department, supported by his students and, along with four other AIs, chosen by the Teaching Award Selection Committee for this distinction.

Course crosses disciplines to educate scientists of the future

Oct. 4, 2004 — In an age when many scientific discoveries result from the infusion of ideas from one discipline to another, faculty members at Princeton have created a unified science class for freshmen that breaks down barriers between fields without sacrificing depth of knowledge.
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