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Italian Studies Courses of Interest Fall 2013


ITA 220
(LA)
Italian Civilization Through the Centuries
Simone Marchesi
Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
This course is designed to give an overview of pivotal moments in Italian culture, such as the relationship between Church and Empire in the Middle Ages, Machiavelli's political theory during the Renaissance, and the rise and fall of Fascism in the 20th century. Through the examination of the most relevant intellectual, historic, and artistic movements and their main geographical venues, students will be able to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the development of Italian history and civilization.
Sample reading list:
Dante, Comedia (selections)
Machiavelli, Il Principe
Leopardi, Canti
Verdi, La Traviata
Morante, La storia
Levi, La tregua


ITA 306 (LA)
The Italian Renaissance: Literature and Society
Pietro Frassica
This course will introduce students to the basic trends and problems of Renaissance literature as the main source of our civilization. The major literary figures of the 16th-century Italian revival (such as Machiavelli, Ariosto, Castiglione, Michelangelo, etc.) will be studied in relation to their time, the courts or the cities where they lived, and their seminal contributions to modern Europe culture including works of visual art, theater, and good living.

Sample reading list:
L. Ariosto, Orlando Ariosto
T. Tasso, Gerusalemme Liberata
N. Machiavelli, Il Principe
Michelangelo, Sonnets
L. Da Vinci, Scritti


ITA 309 (LA)
Topics in Contemporary Italian Civilization - Italy: The Land of Slow-Food
Pietro Frassica
Combining an analysis of Italian literary texts with works of visual art, this course studies the art of cookery in relation to people's environment and history. From Middle Ages to the 21st-century (Dante, Boccaccio, Michelangelo, Goldoni, d'Annunzio, Magris), topics will explore the conceptual preconditions that in recent years have generated the Slow-Food movement, its recycling of its own old traditions as well as its worldwide impact. This course examines food as a window into gender, class and traditions, where food is defined in terms of nutritional health and taste as well as social and ethical phenomena, such as the value of nature.
Sample reading list:
Boccaccio, Decameron (selections)
Pulci, Morgante (selections)
Goldoni, Plays (selections)
D'Annunzio, Il Fuoco (selections)
Tozzi, Tre Croci
Carlo Petrini & Gigi Padovani, Slow Food Revolution


ITA 314 (HA)
Risorgimento, Opera, Film
Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
Explores the way in which national identity was imagined and implemented within Italian history, culture, and cinema before, during, and after the period of Italian Unification in the 19th century. Examples are drawn from a wide range of historical, literary, artistic, and cultural media.
Sample reading list:
Clark, The Italian Risorgimento
Foscolo, Ortis
Visconti, Senso
Collodi, Pinocchio
Aleramo, Una donna
Lampedusa, Il gattopardo


CLA 219 / HIS 219
(HA)
The Roman Empire, 31 B.C. to A.D. 337

Edward J. Champlin
To study the Roman Empire at its height; to trace the transformation of government from a republican oligarchy to despotism; to study the changes wrought by multiculturalism on the old unitary society; to trace the rise of Christianity from persecution to dominance; and to assess Rome's contributions to western civilization.
Sample reading list:
Potter, Ancient Rome
Lewis & Reinhold, Roman Civilization Sourcebook II: The Empire


CLA 326 / HIS 326 (HA)
Topics in Ancient History - The Fall of the Roman Republic
Harriet I. Flower
The decay of republican government came in one of the best attested periods in the history of Rome and has fascinated commentators and historians from ancient times to the present. This course will cover Roman politics and society over the century from 146 BC (the destruction of Carthage) to 44 BC (the murder of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March). Students will be able to research a chosen topic in detail.
Sample reading list:
M. Beard & M. Crawford, Rome in the Late Republic
H.I. Flower (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic
Plutarch, The Fall of the Roman Republic
Cicero, Selected Letters
Caesar, The Civil War


ART 309 / CLA 309 (LA)
Roman Painting
Michael Koortbojian
The course will briefly treat the development of Greek wall painting from the Classical and Hellenistic periods, and then focus on Roman developments - architectural styles and figural styles.The houses of Pompeii will be the main focus. Topics will include: the representation of Greek myths; historical subjects; the origins of still life.
Sample reading list:
Roger Ling, Roman Painting
Additional articles on electronic reserve.


CLA 503
Survey of Selected Latin Literature - Roman Literary History
Robert A. Kaster

An introduction to the major genres of Latin Literature, and to the main scholarly issues involved in their study. Also offers intensive practice in reading Latin.
Sample reading list:
Virgil, Aeneid
Lucretius, De Rerum Natura
Lucan, De Bello Civili
Terence, Adelphoe
Cicero, Pro Caelio
Sallust, Catiline


CLA 526 / HLS 527
Problems in Greek and Roman Philosophy - Sages, Savants, Sophists: The Economy of Knowledge before Plato
Christian Wildberg

This seminar aims to combine the usefulness of a survey course with the excitement of close readings and interpretations of specific texts. We shall be concerned with such questions as the origins of western philosophy, orality and literacy, the transition form poetry to prose writing, the too facile distinction between mythos and logos, and the politics of knowledge acquisition and distribution. Texts to be studied include selected fragments of the Presocratic philosophers (esp. Anaximander, Heraclitus, Parmenides and Empedocles), Aesop, the Seven Sages, some Hippocratic writings and the sophists.
Sample reading list:

Kirk, Raven, Schofield, The Presocratic Philosophers
George Kerferd, The Sophistic Movement
G.E.R. Lloyd, Magic, Reason and Experience
Curd / Graham, The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy


CLA 533
Vergil - Eclogues

Yelena Baraz

After an introductory session on the pastoral, we will read the entire collection, reading each poem closely with attention to its relation to both earlier and later pastoral tradition. We will also explore issues of arrangement within the collection.
Oxford Classical Text, ed. RAB Mynors, P. Vergili Maronis Opera
Paul Alpers, Singer of the Eclogues
Michael Putnam, Virgil's Pastoral Art
Eleanor Leach, Vergil's Eclogues: Landscapes for Experience


MUS 515 / COM 517
Topics in the History of Opera - Monteverdi's L'incoronazione di Poppea
Wendy Heller
The seminar focuses on L'incoronazione di Poppea (1643), Monteverdi's final and most controversial opera. Conducted in conjunction with the rehearsals and production of the opera in MUS 214, the seminar considers Poppea in the context of seventeenth-century Venetian history, cultural, and literature and also examines the problems of producing baroque opera today, including staging, editing and performance practice. Students from other departments welcome; basic ability to read scores required.
Sample reading list:
Monteverdi, L'incoronazione di Poppea
Tacitus, Annals of the Roman Empire
Heller, Emblems of Eloquence: Opera and Women's Voices in
Seventeenth-Century Venice
Rosand, Monteverdi's Last Operas: A Venetian Triology


Courses of Interest

Fall 2012
 
ITA 220 (LA)
Italian Civilization Through the Centuries
Pietro Frassica
Fiorenza A. Weinapple
This course is designed to give an overview of pivotal moments in Italian culture, such as the relationship between Church and Empire in the Middle Ages, Machiavelli's political theory during the Renaissance, and the rise and fall of Fascism in the 20th century. Through the examination of the most relevant intellectual, historic, and artistic movements and their main geographical venues, students will be able to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the development of Italian history and civilization.
Sample reading list:
J. Le Goff, Tempo della Chiesa e tempo del mercante
E. Garin, Rinascimento italiano
D. Mack-Smith, Mussolini
D. Alighieri, De Monarchia (selections), Convivio (selections)
M. Machiavelli, Il Principe
C. Beccaria, Dei Delitti e delle Pene
 
ITA 225 (LA)  
Music and Lyrics: Italy in the Eyes of its Pop Singers
Simone Marchesi
This course is designed to introduce students to the rich tradition of Italian songwriters active between the 1960's and the present. Working at the crossroads of American influences and the tradition of Italian political songs, the cantautori merge popular appeal and literary sophistication. For at least three generations, their songs have provided an engaged soundtrack to Italy's turbulent social, political and cultural transformations in the post-WWII years. As lyrics on the page, as music to be listened to, and as performances recorded in video, Italian canzoni d'autore are part of the Italian identity today.
Sample reading list:
Giangilberto Monti e Veronica Di Pietro, Dizionario dei cantautori
 
ITA 303 / MED 303 (LA)  
Dante's Inferno
Simone Marchesi
Intensive study of the "Inferno", with major attention paid to poetic elements such as structure, allegory, narrative technique, and relation to earlier literature, principally the Latin classics. Course conducted in Italian with highly interactive classes and preceptorials.
Sample reading list:
Dante Alighieri, Inferno
Virgil, Aeneid
St. Augustine, Confessions
Dante, Vita Nuova (Trans. M. Musa)
 
ITA 308 (LA)   No Audit
Topics in 20th-Century Italian Literature - 20th Century Italian Fiction Pietro Frassica
The course's goal is to analyze the Modern movement in Italian fiction from 1900 to the present, particularly as it reflects various responses to social, political and cultural problems of the period. The following topics will be examined: Fascism in literature; literature of neo-realism and its relation with films, and neo-capitalism; the protest movement of the 1960s and '70s, and the new outlook for the '80s, '90s, and beyond.
Sample reading list:
Pirandello, Il fu Mattia Pascal
Svevo, La coscienza di Zeno
Morante, L'isola di Arturo
Pasolini, Ragazzi di vita
Levi, Se questo è un uomo
Calvino, Il sentieri dei nidi di ragno
 
ART 203 (LA)   No Pass/D/Fail
Roman Art
Michael Koortbojian
The course provides a general introduction to Roman art. It discusses various artistic media--portraiture, historical relief, etc.--and highlights important works. The goal is an attempt to understand the significance of the imagery that the Romans produced, and which embellished all aspects of their world - that is, to understand the role of artworks in the Romans' lived experience.
Sample reading list:
Ramage, Roman Art
Bianchi Bandinelli, Art in the Center of Power
Kleiner, Roman Sculpture
 
ART 320 / ARC 320 (LA)
Rome, the Eternal City
John A. Pinto
The main goal of this course is to acquaint students with the major architectural monuments of ancient and post-classical Rome, paying particular attention to creative transformations of form and meaning. The urban development of the city will be stressed and used to provide a contextual reading of individual buildings and public spaces.
Sample reading list:
Krautheimer, Rome, Profile of a City
Boethius, The Golden House of Nero
Ackerman, The Architecture of Michelangelo
Coffin, The Villa in the Life of Renaissance Rome
Pinto, Trevi Fountain
Kostof, The Third Rome
 
ART 445 / ARC 445 (LA)   na, npdf
Topics in the History and Theory of Architecture in Early-Modern Europe - The Rome of Giovanni Battista Piranesi
John A. Pinto
The focus of the seminar will be G.B. Piranesi (1720-1778), as architect, antiquarian, polemicist, dealer, and graphic artist. We will endeavor to see Piranesi in context, to understand his accomplishment against the background of his adopted city and the learned culture that flourished there. Piranesi's publications are well represented in Princeton collections, providing opportunities for those who wish to work closely with original sources.
Sample reading list:
M. Bevilacqua, H.H. Minor, F. Barry, eds., The Serpent and the Stylus
S. Lawrence, ed., Piranesi as Designer
A. Robison, Piranesi: Early Architectural Fantasies
J. Scott, Piranesi
H. Thomas, The Drawings of Giovanni Battista Pranesi
J. Wilton-Ely, The Art and Mind of Giovanni Battista Pranesi
 
ART 513 / CLA 518
Seminar in Roman Art - The Augustian Provinces
Michael Koortbojian
The seminar pursues research on a varying set of topics (differing every year) on ancient Roman art and architecture.
Sample reading list:
Zanker, Power & Images
various, Kaiser Augusuts und die verlorene Republik
various, Hispania Romana
 
ART 535
Problems in Late Antique and Byzantine Art and Architecture - Eastern Roman Empire Staff
Problems in art and architecture of the Eastern Roman Empire and culturally related areas from 300 to 1453.
The Roman Republic
Harriet I. Flower
A study of the causes and consequences of one small city-state's rise to world empire, through analysis of primary sources in translation. Emphasis on the development of Roman society, and the growth and demise of republican government.

Sample reading list:
David Potter, Ancient Rome: A New History
Livy, Rome and Italy
Polybius, The Rise of the Roman Empire
Plutarch, Makers of Rome
Plutarch, Fall of the Roman Republic
 
CLA 220 / HIS 215 (HA)   No Pass/D/Fail
Slavery in the Roman World
Brent D. Shaw
This course considers the problem of slavery in the Roman world, from the early Republic to the end of the Empire. There will be some coverage of the background developments in the slave system under the earlier age of the Greek city-states. A wide range of subjects concerning slavery in Roman society will be considered including the causes of the creation of the Roman slave system, the ways in which it was maintained, its main social and economic functions, and the problem of resistance to servitude.
Sample reading list:
Peter Garnsey, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine
Keith Bradley, Slavery and Society at Rome
Orlando Patterson, Slavery and Social Death
M.I. Finley, Ancient Slavery and Modern Ideology
Thomas Wiedemann, Greek and Roman Slavery
Yvon Garlan, Slavery in Ancient Greece
 
MUS 512 / MED 512
Topics in Medieval Music - The Roman de Fauvel
Rob C. Wegman
Anna Zayaruznaya
The Roman de Fauvel (c.1315), an apocalyptic poem about an equine antichrist figure named Fauvel, survives with music and lyrical interpolations in BN fr. 146, the most lavish of several manuscripts to transmit the colorful tale. The course will use this and other sources as a window into generic, stylistic, and political vicissitudes which took place in French musical culture at the beginning of the fourteenth century.
Sample reading list:
Roesner, Avril & Regalado, eds., Le Roman de Fauvel dans l'edition de Chaillou de Pesstain
Bent & Wathey, eds., Fauvel Studies
Dillon, Emma, Medieval Music-Making and the Roman de Fauvel
Rosenberg & Tischler, eds., The Monophonic Songs in the Roman de Fauvel

Courses of Interest

Spring 2012

* ITA 306 (LA)
The Italian Renaissance: Literature and Society
Fiorenza A. Weinapple 
To introduce students to the basic trends and problems of Renaissance literature as the main source of our civilization. The major literary figures of the Italian literary revival of the 16th century (such as Machiavelli, Guicciardini, Castiglione, Cellini, etc.) will be studied in relation to their time, the courts or the cities where they lived, and their seminal contributions to modern culture.
Sample reading list:
F. Guicciardini,
Ricordi
B. Castiglione, Il Cortegiano
Machiavelli, Il Principe
B. Cellini, Vita
G. Vasari, Vite

* ITA 313 / VIS 446 (LA)
Marxism in Italian Cinema
Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
A study of the influence of Marxist ideology on major Italian directors from the Cold War to the present. Representative films include: Bertolucci's The Last Emperor, Visconti's The Leopard, Pasolini's Teorema, Wertmuller's Seven Beauties, Pontecorvo's The Battle of Algiers. The approach will be interdisciplinary and will combine the analysis of historical and political themes with a cinematic reading of the films.
Sample reading list:
McLellan,
Karl Marx
Brunetta, Italian Cinema
L. Giannetti, Understanding Movies
 
* ITA 319 (LA)
The Literature of Gastronomy
Pietro Frassica
This course studies Italian novels and short stories in English translation, works of visual art, and films which thematize food as reality and metaphor, examining how eating functions within ideological and mythological structures of modern society. Topics will include 'Futurist' cuisine as an aesthetic experience and a prophetic vision, writing during the war, and sublime and erotic cuisine.
Sample reading list:
Collodi,
Pinocchio
J. Hillman, Freud's Own Italian Cookbook (selections)
Marinetti, The Futurist Cookbook (selections)
Malaparte, Skin (selections)
P. Levi, Survival in Auschwitz (selections)
Fellini (film), Roma
 
MUS 232 (LA)
Music in the Renaissance
Anna Zayaruznaya
Survey of European Art Music in the period 1400-1600. The focus is on developments in musical style and notation, as well as practices of borrowing and re-use of musical material in the works of Du Fay, Ockeghem, Josquin, Byrd, Palestrina, Lasso, and their contemporaries.
Sample reading list:
Richard Taruskin,
Music from the Earliest Notations to the Sixteenth Century
Allan Atlas, Anthology of Renaissance Music
Piero Weiss and Richard Taruskin, Music in the Western World: A History in Documents
See instructor for complete list
 
* ART 201 / ARC 205 (LA)
Roman Architecture
Michael Koortbojian
This course will examine the architecture of the Romans, from its mythic beginnings (as recounted, for example, by Vitruvius) to the era of the high empire. Topics will include: city planning; the transformation of the building trades; civic infrastructure; and the full breadth of Roman structures, both public and private.
Sample reading list:
F. Sear,
Roman Architecture
J. Stambaugh, The Ancient Roman City
Vitruvius, Ten Books on Architecture
See instructor for complete list

* ART 415 / CLA 415 (LA)
The Roman House
Michael Koortbojian
This seminar is devoted to the Roman House - in all of its aspects: architecture, decoration, and the social life that carried on within it. Special emphasis will be given to painted interiors, mosaic floors, and decorated gardens, and research topics will concentrate on individual case studies devoted to well-preserved houses.
Sample reading list:
A. Wallace-Hadrill,
Houses and Society in Pompeii and Herculaneum
J. Clarke, The Houses of Roman Italy, 100 BC - AD 250
P. Zanker, Pompeii, Public and Private Life
See instructor for complete list

* CLA 214 / CHV 214 (EM)
The Other Side of Rome
Andrew M. Feldherr
An introduction to Roman culture designed to complicate the traditional image of Rome as a static, rigidly conservative society, the course will explore how the Romans used such issues as gender and sexuality, conspicuous consumption, and slavery to define the place of their civilization within the natural order. Authors like Petronius, Lucan, and Tacitus will focus our attention on the social complexities of imperial Rome. We end with a look at contemporary representations of Rome to ask what role stereotypes of ancient Rome have come to play in 20th century America.
Sample reading list:
Petronius,
Satyricon
Ovid, Art of Love
Edwards, The Politics of Immorality in Ancient Rome
Hopkins, Conquerors and Slaves
Scott, Ridley, Gladiator
 
CLA 546
Problems in Roman History - The Roman Family
Brent D. Shaw
This seminar will attempt both to introduce the subject of Roman family history and to place it in the context of family history in other fields of historical research, especially medieval and early-modern European family history. Some attention will also be devoted to various technical sources such as the use of Roman law in family history, and to the basics of population demography as they apply to the study of Roman family formation. These preliminary materials will be introduced in lecture format by the instructor. The core of the seminar will be devoted to in-seminar presentations and discussions.
Sample reading list:
Tim Parkin,
Demography and Roman Society
Jane F. Gardner, Family and Familia in Roman Law and Life
Suzanne Dixon, The Roman Family
Roger Bagnall & Bruce Frier, The Demography of Roman Egypt
Jane Gardner & Thomas Wiedemann, The Roman Household: A Sourcebook
Tim Parkin, Old Age in the Roman World

* ECS 334 / MUS 334 / COM 322 (LA)
Gamblers, Castrati, Madwomen: An Alternate History of Enlightenment Opera in France and Italy
Ellen Lockhart
We will recreate a "ground view" of 18th-Century opera, its forgotten masterpieces and role within civic and cultural landscapes of ancien-régime Europe. Focus will be on six works: Giulio Cesare (Handel), Zoroastre (Rameau), Le devin (Rousseau), Zémire et Azor (Grétry), Le nozze di Figaro (Mozart), and Nina o La pazza per amore (Paisiello). We will discuss genre and style, and the complex relationship between musical sounds and verbal meanings in both French and Italian traditions. Musical expertise welcome, not required.
Sample reading list:
Daniel Heartz,
Music in European Capitals
John Rosselli, Singers of Italian Opera
Charles Burney, The Present State of Music in Fance and Italy
Robert Gjerdingen, Music in the Galant Style
Stefano Castelvecchi, From Nina to Nina: Psychodrama, in the 1780s
Jeanne LePrince de Beaumont, La belle et la béte (1756)
 
ENG 416 / COM 313 (EM)
Topics in Literature and Ethics - Modern Evil
Simon E. Gikandi
This is a course on the problem of evil in the modern world as it is represented in works of literature and film. What is the nature of evil and how is it imagined? How can the noble ideas that define the modern world--justice and human rights, for example--be reconciled with the terrible events of the twentieth century: genocide, racial violence, and war? Why do good people do terrible things to others? What can reading books on evil in distant places teach us about ourselves? The course will explore how evil functions as a form of deep ethical violation and challenges how we understand the world and our relationship to others.
Sample reading list:
Primo Levi,
Survival in Auschwitz
Ian McEwan, Atonement
Zoe Heller, Notes on a Scandal
Edwidge Daniticat, The Dew Breaker
Michael Ondaatje, Anil's Ghost
Harper Lee, To Kill a Mocking Bird
See instructor for complete list
 
* VIS 342 / COM 361 (LA)
The Cinema from World War II until the Present
P. Adams Sitney
The history of sound, and color film produced since World War II. Emphasis on Italian neorealism, American avant-garde, and the accomplishments of such major film makers as Bergman, Hitchcock, Bresson, and Antonioni. Modernism in film will be a central consideration.
Sample reading list:
Brakhage,
"Metaphors on Vision"
Tarkovsky, "Sculpting in Time"
Bordwell, "Pickpocket and Narrative"
Mulvey, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema"
Tyler, "Rashoman as Modern Art"

Courses of Interest

Fall 2011

* ITA 220 (LA) 
Italian Civilization Through the Centuries
Simone Marchesi

Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
This course is designed to give an overview of pivotal moments in Italian culture, such as the relationship between Church and Empire in the Middle Ages, Machiavelli's political theory during the Renaissance, and the rise and fall of Fascism in the 20th century. Through the examination of the most relevant intellectual, historic, and artistic movements and their main geographical venues, students will be able to acquire a comprehensive understanding of the development of Italian history and civilization.

Sample reading list:
Dante, Comedia (selections)
Machiavelli, Il Principe
Leopardi, Canti
Verdi, La Traviata
Morante, La storia
Levi, La tregua


* ITA 300 (LA)
Techniques of Translation and Composition
Fiorenza A. Weinapple

We will concentrate on the theory and practice of translation, focusing on the stylistic differences present in various genres and periods. An intensive grammatical and syntactical analysis of every piece translated will be conducted through class discussion. Students will be required to write original compositions following the stylistic mode of the various pieces translated. Texts to be translated will include selections from English and American writers, from the 18th (J. Austen) to the 20th century (J. Heller), and poetry as well as prose.

Sample reading list:
J. Austen, Pride & Prejudice (selections)
H. Miller, Tropic of Cancer (selections)
E. Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises (selections)
J. Heller, Catch 22


* ITA 302 (LA)   na, npdf
Topics in Medieval Italian Literature and Culture - Boccaccio
Simone Marchesi

Boccaccio's "Decameron" is the preeminent masterwork of early Italian prose. A complex set of stories, linked by the author's convictions about literature and love, the "Decameron" offers both a panorama of fourteenth-century European society and a point of entry into some great traditions of European literature. This seminar will concentrate on a close reading of the "Decameron" in the original language.

Sample reading list:
Boccaccio, Decameron
Picone & Mesirca, Introduzione al Decameron (selections)
Forni & Bragantini, Lessico Critico Decameroniano (selections)

* ART 210 (LA)  
Italian Renaissance Painting and Sculpture
Staff

Lectures will examine the birth, rise and flowering of Italian Renaissance art in Tuscany, Rome and Venice from about 1250 to 1600 A.D., with emphasis on the 15th and 16th centuries. Artists and works of art will be presented, whenever possible and relevant, within their cultural, political, social, technological and/or economic circumstances. Among the major artists to be studied: Giotto, Ghiberti, Donatello, Masaccio, Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian.

* ART 303 (LA)   No Pass/D/Fail
Death in Rome
Michael Koortbojian

The course will survey the Roman monuments for the commemoration of the dead, and the social and cultural practices that inform them. Emphasis will be given to a comprehensive view of all related evidence, so as to interpret those major works of Roman art--notably, tombs and carved marble sarcophagi--in their proper historical setting.

Sample reading list:
J.M.C. Toynbee, Death and Burial in the Roman World
P. Zanker, Roman Art
B. Bergmann and C. Kondoleon, The Art of Ancient Spectacle
V.M. Hope and E. Marshall, Death and Disease in the Ancient City
A. Wallace-Hadrill, Commemorating the Dead


* ART 430 / HLS 430 / MED 430 (LA)   No Audit
Seminar. Medieval Art
Jelena Trkulja

Nino Zchomelidse
The "Two Romes" addresses the idea of Rome as the center of the civilized world. We begin with the historical significance of the Roman Empire before Constantine I, explore the transfer of Roman authority to his new capital, Constantinople, and compare their parallel lives until the 15th c. How did the Roman heritage affect architecture, urbanism, and art in the two cities? As we try to reconstruct the appearance of the two cities, we discuss concepts behind political and religious leadership as they intersect with the power of the arts and the self-referential character of the cities, both obsessed with their soteriological mission.

Sample reading list:
Krautheimer, Richard, Rome, Profile of a City (Princeton, 1980)
Krautheimer, Richard, Early Christian and Byzantine Architecture
Belting, Hans, Likeness and Presence (Chicago, 1994)
Kessler, Hebert L. and Zacharias, Johanna, Rome 1300: On the Path of the Pilgrim, (New Haven/London...


 * ART 513 / CLA 518   No Audit
Seminar in Roman Art
Michael Koortbojian

The Late Empire: Seminar will be devoted to the transformation of Roman art and architecture in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. Among the topics to be treated will be: the so-called "Stilwandel"; the change in portraiture from the Severan period onward; the possible relationship between the absence of major public monuments after the Severan period and the plethora of surviving small-scale works; the late Roman taste for mosaics (esp. Piazza Armerina); the increasing abstraction of late Roman style(s); Riegl's opposition of the "haptic" and "optic"; etc.

Other Requirements:
Open to Graduate Students Only.

Other information:
Topics for the readings will include: Nodelman on portraits; Riegl and his commentators on style; Rodenwaldt on late Roman relief; the recent debate on the Arcus Constantini and its date; the survival of mythological subject matter into the 4th century; etc, etc. 

* ART 541   No Pass/D/Fail
Seminar in Renaissance Art
Staff

This seminar will focus on aspects of Titian's art and career, within the contexts of Renaissance Venice and Europe, the political and religious events of the sixteenth century, the traditions of European painting, and the position of the artist in the longer history of art. Topics will include the development of oil painting, the organization of pictorial production (workshops and guilds), the social and political status of the artist, the development of a language of art criticism, the altarpiece and religious imagery, historical narrative, portraiture and patronage, mythological imagery, and the question of "old-age style".

Sample reading list:
Vasari, Giorgio, Lives of the Artists
Roskill, Mark, Dolce's "Aretino" & Venetian Art Theory
Ridolfi, Carlo, The Life and Times of Titian
Humfrey, Peter, Titian
Falmoir, Miguel, Tiziano
Rosand, David, Painting in Sixteenth-Century Venice

* CLA 219 / HIS 219 (HA) 
The Roman Empire, 31 B.C. to A.D. 337
Edward J. Champlin

To study the Roman Empire at its height; to trace the transformation of government from a republican oligarchy to despotism; to study the changes wrought by multiculturalism on the old unitary society; to trace the rise of Christianity from persecution to dominance; and to assess Rome's contributions to western civilization.

Sample reading list:
Potter, Ancient Rome
Lewis & Reinhold, Roman Civilization Sourcebook II: The Empire

* CLA 345 (HA)
Ancient Greco-Roman Medicine: From Hippocrates to Galen
Brooke A. Holmes

This course is for undergraduates from all backgrounds with an interest in ancient Greco-Roman medicine and the historical roots of contemporary biomedicine. We will examine how a medical tradition forms around the body as an object of knowledge and therapy, paying close attention to socio-historical context. We also explore issues that remain relevant to medicine, such as the construction of scientific authority, pain and knowledge, error and chance in medicine, narrative and disease, the "naturalization" of cultural categories, the privileging of anatomy, and body-mind interaction. Reading from primary and secondary sources in translation.

Sample reading list:
G.E.R. Lloyd, Hippocratic Writings
J. Jouanna, Hippocrates
H. King, Hippocrates' Woman
S. Kuriyama, The Expressiveness of the Body
V. Nutton, Ancient Medicine
M. Frede and R. Walzer, Galen: Three Treatises on the Nature of Science

CLA 503  
Survey of Selected Latin Literature - Roman Literary History
Denis Feeney
An introduction to the major genres of Latin Literature, and to the main scholarly issues involved in their study. Also offers intensive practice in reading Latin.

Sample reading list:
Virgil, Aeneid
Lucretius, De Rerum Natura
Lucan, De Bello Civili
Terence, Adelphoe
Cicero, Pro Caelio
Sallust, Catiline
 


Courses of Interest

Spring 2011

* ITA 304 / MED 304 (LA)   na, npdf
Dante's "Purgatorio" and "Paradiso"
This course is a continuation of ITA 303 and provides an occasion for close collaborative study of the final "cantiche" of the "Commedia". Half the semester will be devoted to the "Purgatorio", half to the "Paradiso". "Vita Nuova" will be read over Break.

Sample reading list:
Dante, Purgatorio
Dante, Paradiso
Dante, Vita nuova

* ITA 309
(LA)   na, npdf
Topics in Contemporary Italian Civilization - Pirandello's Generic Transformation: From Short Story to Theater
The course is intended to provide an introduction to Pirandello, concentrating on his evolution from short-story writer to dramatist. Special attention will be given to those cases in which Pirandello transformed one of his own stories into a play. We will also consider the ways in which the dramatist gives additional psychological depth to the characters that appear in his short stories. In addition, we will examine how Pirandello's plays are also miniature psychodramas that reenact the dramatist's own obsessions.

Sample reading list:
Pirandello, L'uomo dal fiore in bocca
Pirandello, Lumíe di Sicilia
Pirandello, La patente
Pirandello, I giganti della montagna
Pirandello, O di uno o di nessuno
Pirandello, I sei personaggi in cerca d'autore

* ITA 312 / VIS 445
(LA)  
Fascism in Italian Cinema
This course, conducted in English, is a study of Fascist ideology through selected films from World War II to the present. Topics include: the concept of Fascist normality; Racial Laws; the role of women; and the opposition of the intellectual left. Films include: Bertolucci's "The Conformist", Fellini's "Amarcord", Rossellini's "Rome Open City", Rosi's "The Truce", and Benigni's "Life is Beautiful". The approach is interdisciplinary and combines the analysis of socio-historical themes with a cinematic reading of the films.

Sample reading list:
Clark, Mussolini
P. Bondanella, Italian Cinema
L. Giannetti, Understanding Movies
 
* ITA 1027   na, npdf
Intensive Intermediate and Advanced Italian
ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
Italian 102-7 is an intensive double credit course designed to help students develop an active command of the language. Reading comprehension and oral proficiency as well as reading skills and grammatical accuracy will be developed through various activities. A solid grammatical basis and awareness of the idiomatic usage of the language will be emphasized. Students will be familiarized with various cultural aspects of Italy through readings, cultural videos, and films.

Sample reading list:
Lazzarino - Aski - Dini, Prego

CLA 524
 
Roman History - Problems and Methods
A seminar that introduces graduate students to current methods and debates in Roman history and historiography. Provides a chronological overview of the history of Rome and her expanding empire from early times (8th century BC) to the end of the Severan era (AD 235), accompanied by the study of a wide variety of ancient sources, including texts, inscriptions, coins, material culture, art, and archaeology, and the methods commonly used by modern historians to analyze them. Students acquire the basic tools needed to do research in Roman history.

Sample reading list:
D.S. Potter, 2009, Ancient Rome: A New History
C. Nicolet, 1980, The World of Citizen in Republican Rome
M. Goodman, 1997, The Roman World 44 BC-AD180
C. Scarre, 1995, The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Rome
C.S. Mackay, Ancient Rome: A Military and Political History
J. Rupke, 2007, Religion of the Romans

Other Requirements:
Open to Graduate Students Only.
 
ART 486 / ECS 486 (LA)  
Order and Chaos in Eighteenth-Century European Art
This seminar looks at order and chaos as organizing principles for an exploration of 18th century European art. Drawing on primary texts, the course focuses on key figures in British, French, and Italian art to understand their relationship to fundamental Enlightenment discourses concerning the ordering of knowledge and society at a time of dramatic social, economic, and political change. The course will draw heavily on period literary sources, and on both key individual creative artists and wider social contexts.

Sample reading list:
Matthew Craske, Art in Europe 1700-1830 Albert Boime, Art in the Age of Revolution, 1750-1800 Robert Rosenblum, Transformations in Late Eighteenth-Century Art Thomas Crow, Painters and Public Life in Eighteenth-Century Paris
William Hogarth, The Analysis of Beauty Sir Joshua Reynolds, Discourses on Art
 
HOS 591 / COM 591 / PHI 591  
The Scientific Revolution
This is an interdisciplinary seminar on issues surrounding observation and experiment in early-modern science. Among issues discussed are new conceptions of natural history, the development of the telescope and the controversies over its first uses, the relations between experiment and reason, and the founding of the Royal Society. Figures discussed may include Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Boyle, and Hobbes. We will also discuss some contemporary critical literature from history of science, sociology of science, and the philosophy of science on observation and experiment.

Sample reading list:
Francis Bacon, Sylva Sylvarum Galileo Galilei, The Starry Messenger Rene Descartes, Meteors Thomas Sprat, History of the Royal Society Steven Shapin and Simon Schaffer, Leviathan and the Airpump Thomas Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions
COM 559 / FRE 558  
Constraint in Modern European Fiction & Poetry
A study of 20th century writing in European languages relying to some degree on the principle of constraint or 'strict form'. Queneau, Calvino, Mathews, Perec, Roubaud and other members of Oulipo will constitute the central focus, but depending on students' linguistic competences works by e.g., Harig, Kharms, Nabokov, Cortazar may be included. Attention will be focussed on underlying principles as well as on practice and product.

Sample reading list:
Queneau, The Blue Flowers Mathews, Cigarettes Perec, Life A User's Manual Calvino, If on a winter's night Roubaud, Great Fire of London Mathews et al, Oulipo Compendium
 
COM 547 
The Renaissance - Europe and Shakespeare
A course on literary relations in the early modern period, from the continent to Shakespeare. After some attention to theories of intertextuality, reading, translation, and influence, we will focus on several major European authors from antiquity and the Renaissance, particularly as they emerge in the astonishing industry of Elizabethan translation, e.g., Golding's Ovid, North's Plutarch, Harington's Ariosto, Holland's Livy, and Florio's Montaigne. We will consider these works in triangulation: the foreign original, the Elizabethan English version, the re-emergence of both in Shakespeare's plays.

Sample reading list:
Ovid, Metamorphoses Petrarch, Selected works Montaigne, Essays Shakespeare, Love's Labour's Lost Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing Shakespeare, Coriolanus
 
* COM 311 / MED 311 (LA)  
Reading Medieval Culture
Medieval culture, literature and literary theory, as well as Modern critical debates currently being staged, highlight the diversity of cultural production in the European Middle Ages. This course explores such topics as Medieval textuality and reading, text and image, subjectivity and spirituality, premodern sex and gender, and myths and realities of Medieval nation-building.

Sample reading list:
Anon., Song of Roland Chretien de Troyes, Cligés Augustine, Confessions Ruiz, Book of Good Love Boccaccio, Decameron Chaucer, Dream Visions
 
 
* MUS 232 (LA)  
Music in the Renaissance
General historical survey of European Art Music in the period 1400-1600, covering such composers as Dufay, Ockeghem, Josquin, Byrd, Palestrina, Lasso, etc.

Sample reading list:
Allan Atlas, Renaissance Music (New York 1998) with Anthology
  
POL 411 / CLA 411 (SA)   na, npdf
Seminar in Political Theory - Greece and Rome as Political Models
ENROLLMENT BY APPLICATION OR INTERVIEW. DEPARTMENTAL PERMISSION REQUIRED.
What political models do ancient Athens, Sparta, and Rome represent, and how have these models been interpreted and used in the subsequent history of political thought? Half of this course is devoted to understanding the political institutions of ancient Greece and Rome by reading major historical writers of the time such as Thucydides, Livy, and Plutarch, as well as modern scholars. The other half explores the significance of Greece and Rome for political theory, including case studies of authors such as Machiavelli, Rousseau, John Stuart Mill, and modern democratic theorists.

Sample reading list:
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War Livy, The History of Rome Plutarch, Lives of the Noble Greeks and Romans Machiavelli, Discourses on Livy Harrington, The Commonwealth of Oceana John Stuart Mill, Considerations on Representative Government
 
HIS 341 (HA)  
Between Resistance and Collaboration: The Second World War in Europe
In the broader context of conflict between fascism, communism, and liberal democracy, we shall examine various patterns and methods of occupation, collaboration, and resistance during World War II in Western and Eastern Europe. The Holocaust of European Jewry and the technology of terror will be discussed. We will try to ascertain how elites and different social strata were affected by the impact of war and occupation. Students will be asked to read historical studies as well as personal narratives by eyewitnesses and participants.

Sample reading list:
Mark Mazower, Hitler's Empire: How the Nazis Ruled Europe Robert Paxton, Vichy France. Old Guard and the New Order, 1940-1944 Zygmunt Klukowski, Diary from the Years of Occupation, 1939-1944 Yitzhak Zuckerman, A Surplus of Memory: Chronicle of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising Primo Levi, The Drowned and the Saved Henri Michel, The Shadow war: Resistance in Europe, 1939-1945


Fall 2010

* ART 320 / ARC 320 (LA)  
Rome, the Eternal City
John A. Pinto
The main goal of this course is to acquaint students with the major architectural monuments of ancient and post-classical Rome, paying particular attention to creative transformations of form and meaning. The urban development of the city will be stressed and used to provide a contextual reading of individual buildings and public spaces.
 
ART 543   No Pass/D/Fail
Replication and Movement in the Renaissance
Christopher P. Heuer
Examination of the ideas of time and temporality in the Renaissance image, via the lens of two early modern obsessions and their history: the representation of movement and the idea of the copy. Focus will be on artists and works from the Netherlands, Germany, and Italy. Topics include: procession, print technology, replicas, pilgrimage, archaeology, the workshop, and more. Course includes at least one trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art.
* CLA 326 / HIS 326 (HA)   No Pass/D/Fail
Topics in Ancient History - Religion in Roman Society
Harriet I. Flower
This course will introduce students to a wide variety of different religious experiences in Rome during republican times and under Augustus. Topics will include civic cult, domestic religion within the household and local neighborhood, and the introduction of foreign cults into the city of Rome. We will be using a range of ancient sources such as literary texts, inscriptions, archaeological data, artistic representations, coins, and the topography of sacred spaces inside and outside the city.
* COM 543
Topics in Medieval Literature - Rhyme or Reason
Daniel Heller-Roazen
What is rhyme? And does it have a reason? Today we take the association of rhyme with poetry to be self-evident. But in the classical world, rhyme was known above all as an ornament of prose, and it was the troubadours who first made of rhyme a fundamental poetic device. This seminar will seek to understand the implications of this fact through close study of Arnaut Daniel, the troubadour whom Dante's Guinizelli called the "better craftsman of the mother tongue." Topics to be discussed include rhythm, meter, and consonance, ancient precedents to medieval rhyme, rhyme & prose, the linguistics analysis of rhyme, and rhyme across languages.
* ITA 303 / MED 303 (LA)
Dante's Inferno
Simone Marchesi
Intensive study of the "Inferno", with major attention paid to poetic elements such as structure, allegory, narrative technique, and relation to earlier literature, principally the Latin classics. Course conducted in Italian with highly interactive classes and preceptorials.
* ITA 308 (LA)   No Audit
Topics in 20th-Century Italian Literature - 20th Century Italian Fiction
Pietro Frassica
The course's goal is to analyze the Modern movement in Italian fiction from 1900 to the present, particularly as it reflects various responses to social, political and cultural problems of the period. The following topics will be examined: Fascism in literature; literature of neo-realism and its relation with films, and neo-capitalism; the protest movement of the 1960s and '70s, and the new outlook for the '80s and the '90s.
* ITA 401 (LA)
Seminar in Italian Literature and Culture - Performance and Spectacle in Modern Italian Theater and Film
Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
The purpose of this course will be to explore the dynamics of spectacle and performance (artistic, political, sexual, anthropological) in representative plays and films by major Italian authors of the 20th century. A close analysis of works by the Futurists, Eleonora Duse, Pirandello, Fo, De Filippo, Bertolucci, Fellini, and Visconti will enable us to address questions of a textual and critical nature related to contemporary issues. Special attention will be given to the representation of individual and societal tensions, the imaging of the female voice, and the relations between the political and artistic imagination.
  * LAT 337 (HA)
Roman Republican Historians
Robert A. Kaster
The course offers an introduction to the two major historians of the late Republic, Sallust and Caesar. In addition to close readings of both authors' works, we will focus on such larger issues as the political role of the historian, and the impact contemporary concerns had on each writer's shaping of Rome's past.
 POL 510 
Machiavelli and Renaissance Political Thought
Maurizio Viroli
Seminar offers graduate students the opportunity to explore the historical meaning of Machiavellis thought in the context of Italian Renaissance political and intellectual life. Special attention dedicated to refining interpretive skills necessary to understand texts of the XVth and XVIth centuries and learning to avoid the most common misinterpretations that have historically affected the comprehension of Machiavelli's thought.

* TRA 400 / COM 409 (LA)   na, npdf
Senior Seminar in Translation and Intercultural Communication
Michael G. Wood
This is a required course for students taking the certificate in Translation and Intercultural Communication, but is open to all who are interested in translation in any of its aspects, that is, in movements between languages of any sort. The seminar will incorporate into its continuing work the individual experiences of the members of the seminar in their contact with different disciplines and idioms and, where relevant, in developing their senior theses. Certain key texts in literature, film, politics and philosophy will provide a shared ground for our weekly discussions.

Courses of Interest

Spring 2010

ITA 302
Topics in Medieval Italian Literature and Culture - Petrarch's Lyric Poetry
Simone Marchesi
Tuesday, 1:30-4:20 p.m.

Considered by many the greatest scholar of his age, a successful rival to Dante, the revered teacher of Boccaccio, Petrarch bequeathed to posterity the most beautiful sonnets ever written in the Florentine vernacular. In the course, we will study the "Canzoniere", his collection of lyric poetry, a book which shaped the language of love in the European Renaissance, and a sample from his "Trionfi". The texts will be analyzed in relation to their historical and cultural context and for the impact they will have on modern European Literature.

ITA 306 (LA)
The Italian Renaissance: Literature and Society
Pietro Frassica
Thursday, 1:30 – 4:20 p.m.
This course will introduce students to the basic trends and problems of Renaissance literature as the main source of our civilization. The major literary figures of the 16th-century Italian revival (such as Machiavelli, Ariosto, Castiglione, Michelangelo, etc.) will be studied in relation to their time, the courts or the cities where they lived, and their seminal contributions to modern Europe culture including works of visual art, theater, and good living.

ITA 313 / VIS 446 (LA)
Marxism in Italian Cinema
Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
Wednesday, 1:30 – 2:50 p.m. (lecture) and Tuesday, 7:30-10:20 p.m. (film) and precept
A study of the influence of Marxist ideology on major Italian directors from the Cold War to the present. Representative films include: Bertolucci's The Last Emperor, Visconti's The Leopard, Pasolini's Teorema, Wertmuller's Seven Beauties, Pontecorvo's The Battle of Algiers. The approach will be interdisciplinary and will combine the analysis of historical and political themes with a cinematic reading of the films.

ART 513 / CLA 518   na, npdf
Seminar in Roman Art
Michael Koortbojian
Wednesday, 1:30-4:20 p.m.

Roman "Triumphal" Monuments. Seminar examines Roman culture celebrations of military accomplishment in all their varied forms, from the public triumphal procession to the monumental structures of the imperial period that transformed such fleeting celebrations into architectural and sculptural structures of enduring presence.

LAT 340 (LA)
Roman Satire
Yelena Baraz
Monday and Wednesday, 1:30-2:50 p.m.
Introduction to Roman verse satire. Satires of Horace and Juvenal are read, with selections from Persius and Lucilius. Topics include origins and development of satire in Rome, types of invective and persona of the satirist.

Fall 2009

* ITA 309 (LA)   na, npdf
Topics in Contemporary Italian Civilization - Italy: The Land of Slow-Food
Pietro Frassica
Wednesday, 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Combining an analysis of Italian literary texts with works of visual art, this course studies the art of cookery in relation to people's environment and history. From Middle Ages to the 21st-century (Dante, Boccaccio, Michelangelo, Goldoni, d'Annunzio, Magris), topics will explore the conceptual preconditions that in recent years have generated the Slow-Food movement, its recycling of its own old traditions as well as its worldwide impact. This course examines food as a window into gender, class and traditions, where food is defined in terms of nutritional health and taste as well as social and ethical phenomena, such as the value of nature.

* ITA 314 (HA)
Risorgimento, Opera, Film
Gaetana Marrone-Puglia
Thursday, 12:30 pm - 1:20 pm and TBA precept

Explores the way in which national identity was imagined and implemented within Italian history, culture, and cinema before, during, and after the period of Italian Unification in the 19th century. Examples are drawn from a wide range of historical, literary, artistic, and cultural media.

ART 542   No Pass/D/Fail
Art and Society in Renaissance Italy - Polarities in Medieval and Renaissance Venetian Architecture
Deborah Janet Howard
Wednesday, 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

The course will be framed around a series of polarities, through which we explore the ways in which apparent opposites were reconciled in the architectural setting of medieval and Renaissance Venice. These will include: Republic and Empire; Church and State; East and West; Gothic and Classical; Military and Civil; Sound and Space; Architect and Proto; Tradition and Reform; Town and Country; Nobles and Citizens; Utopia and Reality. The architecture will be studied as a context for human activity, with special attention to its response to the amphibious site and its ideological meanings.

CLA 536 / COM 530
Ovid - Metamorphoses
Andrew M. Feldherr
Wednesday, 1:30-4:20 p.m.

Reading Ovid's Metamorphoses in its entirety and an introduction to recent critical approaches to the work. Designed to be accessible to graduate students in other humanities departments, provided they have some Latin.

CLA 546  
Problems in Roman History - Religion and Magic in Ancient Rome
Harriet I. Flower
Tuesday, 9:00 am - 11:50 am

An examination of the varieties of religious experience (domestic, civic, local, imported) at Rome during the Republic and Early Empire. Particular attention is given to the range of extant ancient sources (literary, material, epigraphical) and to recent models and interpretations of Roman religion(s) by modern scholars. Religious rituals and power are studied in relation to complementary and contrasting spheres, especially magic and other occult experiences. Continuity and change in Roman religion are examined in the context of political and cultural change.
 

 

MUS 515 / COM 512 / ITA 557   No Audit
Topics in the History of Opera - The Italian Epic in 18th-Century Opera: Love, War and Sorcery
Pietro Frassica
Wendy Heller
Thursday, 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm

Examines Ariosto's "Orlando furioso" and Tasso's "Gerusalemme liberata" and their use in opera of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Intended for graduate students in music, literature, and art history, seminar will combine close readings of operas by such composers as Lully, Handel, Vivaldi, Gluck, and Haydn with a broader consideration of the reception of the Italian epics in eighteenth-century art and literature.