News at Princeton

Saturday, April 18, 2015
 writing seminar "Superhero Trials" Sajan Saini

Lecturer in the Princeton Writing Program Sajan Saini teaches the writing seminar “Superhero Trials" for freshmen as they learn how to write college papers. Using comic books as source materials, the students discuss ancient mythology, literary theory about heroic figures and modern theories on identity. 

 

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Video feature: Students learn to write through 'Superhero Trials'

The writing seminar "Superhero Trials" gives freshmen an opportunity to study a fun, familiar topic through a literary and cultural lens while learning how to write college-level papers.  

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Robertson awarded scholarship for postgraduate study at Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

Princeton senior Jake Robertson has been awarded a St. Andrew's Society Scholarship for postgraduate study at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. He will pursue a master's in classical and contemporary text (acting).

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Trevino named Graduate School associate dean for diversity and inclusion

Dale Trevino, whose career has focused on promoting diversity in higher education, will become the associate dean for diversity and inclusion at Princeton University's Graduate School. His appointment is effective July 1.

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Mathematics major Wigderson named Goldwater Scholar

Princeton junior Yuval Wigderson has been awarded a Goldwater Scholarship, the premier award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering.

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Gonzalez appointed associate dean of the college, will focus on access and inclusion

Khristina Gonzalez has been appointed Princeton University's associate dean of the college for programs of access and inclusion. Gonzalez previously served as associate director of the Princeton Writing Center. Gonzalez, who began her new role this month, is responsible for programs and initiatives within the Office of the Dean of the College (ODOC) that support and advance Princeton's commitment to a diverse and inclusive student body.

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Princeton junior Roberts awarded Truman Scholarship for public service pursuits

Princeton University junior Thomas Roberts has been awarded a 2015 Truman Scholarship, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate study. Roberts, who is from Morris, Minnesota, is majoring in astrophysical sciences and plans to pursue a master's degree in public policy focused on international and global affairs. The award, which was given to 58 students among 688 candidates nationwide, "recognizes college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education or elsewhere in the public service."

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Google chair and alumnus Schmidt stokes student innovation at HackPrinceton

In the age of big data and artificial intelligence, the young generation is poised to revolutionize the way humans and computers interact, said Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, speaking to an audience of more than 500 students from the United States and Canada at the biannual HackPrinceton on campus on Saturday, April 11.

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Junior Narayanan awarded Beinecke Scholarship for postgraduate study in anthropology

Princeton junior Varshini Narayanan has been awarded a Beinecke Scholarship, which supports promising students in their graduate studies in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

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$10 million gift from alumnus funds Music Building at Princeton

A Princeton alumnus and his wife have given $10 million for the Music Building that is part of the University's arts complex under construction near University Place and Alexander Street. The building eventually will be named by the donors, who wish to remain anonymous for now.

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Dale Fellowship winner Clifton will create original play in Serbia

Princeton University senior Katherine Clifton was first inspired to write a play about hostility between the Serbs and Romani people while participating in Princeton's Bridge Year Program. Five years later, she will do just that as the 2015 winner of the Martin Dale Fellowship.

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I picked Princeton because …

As high school students weigh Princeton's offer of admission to the Class of 2019, a group of undergraduate bloggers for the Office of Admission has been reflecting on why they decided to come to Princeton.

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Chapel gathering focuses on understanding and overcoming differences

Students, faculty and staff gathered in the University Chapel on Sunday afternoon for a program of speeches and music in which members of the community reflected on ways to understand and overcome their differences. In his welcoming remarks, President Christopher L. Eisgruber said he hoped the gathering “will give us a chance to reflect on problems that confront us, on differences that divide us, and on values that we share."

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Advanced material for prosthetic limbs scheduled for launch to Space Station

Lenore Rasmussen's dream of developing a synthetic muscle that could be used to make better prosthetic limbs and more responsive robots will literally become airborne at 4:33 p.m. on April 13 when her experiment will rocket off to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Rasmussen, a synthetic polymer chemist and founder of Ras Labs, has worked closely with researchers and engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to develop the material's ability to adhere to metal. 

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Eisgruber chooses 'Whistling Vivaldi' for Pre-read

Members of Princeton's incoming Class of 2019 will be given their first assignment well before they arrive on campus. President Christopher L. Eisgruber will ask freshmen to read "Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do" by social psychologist Claude Steele for the third year of the Princeton Pre-read, an introduction to the intellectual life of the University that centers on a book read by members of the freshman class and others in the Princeton community.

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Senior thesis: Study abroad inspires project on languages, education

Abidjan Walker, a comparative literature major from Hanover, New Hampshire, has studied in China, Morocco and Switzerland. Building her linguistic and cultural toolkit sparked her senior thesis, which focuses on the language of instruction in educational systems in these countries.

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Faculty adopts statement affirming commitment to freedom of expression at Princeton

The Princeton faculty adopted a statement Monday, April 6, affirming the University's commitment to the principles of academic freedom and freedom of expression as essential to the University's educational mission.

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Class snapshot: 'The New Jim Crow'

This semester, 43 undergraduates are exploring the political development of America's racially disparate crime policy in the course "The New Jim Crow: U.S. Crime Policy from Constitutional Formation to Ferguson," taught by Naomi Murakawa, an associate professor of African American studies. 

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Princeton University Library acquires philosopher Derrida's personal library

The Princeton University Library has acquired the personal working library of philosopher Jacques Derrida, who died in 2004.

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Student engineers' project expands access to clean water in Kenyan village

In 2012, Swahili lecturer Mahiri Mwita approached Princeton University's chapter of Engineers Without Borders with the idea of starting a project in the Kuria District of Kenya where he grew up. Three years later, a team of Princeton engineering students has helped design and build an award-winning rainwater catchment system there to provide clean, reliable water, and the group plans to build another system this summer.

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James Olsen: Perspective on the world's biggest particle collider coming online again

Numerous Princeton University researchers will be ready once the Large Hadron Collider is "switched on" after a two-year hiatus during which it has been upgraded to run at a higher energy. Princeton physics professor James Olsen, who oversees all physics results for the collider's Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, discusses the discoveries that lay ahead at the LHC. Having uncovered the Higgs particle during its first run, the collider will now be used to produce insights into some of the universe's foremost mysteries, including the nature of dark matter and a theory known as supersymmetry.

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Economist Krueger offers first-hand look back at GM, Chrysler rescue

Alan Krueger, a Princeton economist and former economic adviser to President Barack Obama, looks back at the rescue of General Motors and Chrysler during the financial crisis.

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Princeton offers admission to 6.99 percent of Class of 2019 applicants

Princeton University has offered admission to 1,908 students, or 6.99 percent of the 27,290 applicants for the Class of 2019, in what is the University’s most selective admission process to date.  Last year, the University's admission rate was 7.28 percent. The class size is expected to be 1,310 students for the Class of 2019.

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'First-gen' students and faculty connect over dinner

First-generation college students often experience university life differently than many of their classmates. Freshman Matthew Choi Taitano cherishes the bed in his dorm after sleeping for years on the couch or floor at home. The first time junior Dallas Nan's family will visit campus will be when he graduates. Before his freshman year of college, Professor Robert George had never written a paper that was more than a book report. Such personal stories were shared during a dinner for Princeton University students and faculty who are among the first in their families to attend college.

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Battery bounce test often bounces off target

Researchers at Princeton University have found that the common test of bouncing a household battery to learn if it is dead or not is not actually an effective way to check a battery's charge. 

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Schmidt fund awards promote new technologies in computation and health

Two exploratory and promising research projects — a quantum computer based on a recently observed exotic particle and a smartphone that could replace laboratory tests in healthcare settings — have been awarded funding at Princeton University through the Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund.

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Vice president for campus life search committee formed

A committee has been formed to search for Princeton University's next vice president for campus life. Cynthia Cherrey has announced she will step down from the role in August to become president and chief executive officer of the International Leadership Association (ILA).

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Antibiotic effectiveness imperiled as use in livestock expected to increase 67 percent by 2030

Princeton University-led research found that antibiotic consumption in livestock worldwide could rise by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030, and possibly endanger the effectiveness of antimicrobials in humans.

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A 'long awaited recognition': Nash receives Abel Prize for revered work in mathematics

Princeton University mathematician John Nash received the 2015 Abel Prize from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for his seminal work on partial differential equations, which are used to describe the basic laws of scientific phenomena. The award is one of the most prestigious in the field of mathematics and includes an $800,000 prize. Nash shares the prize with longtime colleague Louis Nirenberg, a professor emeritus at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

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President Eisgruber appoints search committee for new dean of the college

President Christopher L. Eisgruber has formed a committee to search for a successor to Valerie Smith, who is stepping down as Princeton's dean of the college at the end of the academic year to become president of Swarthmore College.  

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Senior Falcon awarded Michel David-Weill Scholarship for study at Sciences Po

Princeton University senior Eric Falcon has been awarded the 2015 Michel David-Weill Scholarship to pursue a master's degree in European affairs at Sciences Po in Paris.

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Fernández-Kelly shines light on overlooked communities

The people of West Baltimore populate Princeton sociologist Patricia Fernández-Kelly's recently released book, "The Hero's Fight: African Americans in West Baltimore and the Shadow of the State."

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Princeton falls to Maryland in NCAA tourney, finishes season 31-1

The University of Maryland defeated Princeton University 85-70 on Monday evening in the second round of the NCAA women's basketball tournament. The defeat was the first of the year for Coach Courtney Banghart and the Tigers, who finished the season 31-1.

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Class snapshot: 'The Artist at Work'

This spring, 13 Princeton undergraduates are exploring the artist's studio from historical, contemporary, physical and conceptual perspectives in "The Artist at Work." The instructor is Irene Small, assistant professor of art and archaeology, who teaches courses on modernism and contemporary art and criticism in a global context.

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Princeton employees honored for dedication and service

Six Princeton staff members were recognized for their commitment to excellence and exceptional performance during the University's annual Service Recognition Luncheon on March 16 in Jadwin Gymnasium. In addition, two staff members were honored for their leadership potential.

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Benjamin delves into 'discriminatory design' in medical, scientific research

On Jan. 30, Ruha Benjamin, an assistant professor in the Center for African American Studies, blended a sociologist's observational skills and an actor's sense of storytelling in 21-minute TedX Baltimore talk "From the Park Bench to the Lab Bench: What Kind of Future Are We Designing?" — which gives viewers a backstage tour of what she calls "discriminatory design."

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Scheide donates rare books library to Princeton; collection is largest gift in University's history

Musician, musicologist, bibliophile and philanthropist William H. Scheide, a 1936 Princeton University alumnus who died in November at age 100, has left his extraordinary collection of some 2,500 rare printed books and manuscripts to Princeton University. With an expected appraised value of nearly $300 million, it is the largest gift in the University's history.

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Princeton University Art Museum names Elderfield distinguished curator, lecturer

John Elderfield, chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, has been named the first Allen R. Adler, Class of 1967, Distinguished Curator and Lecturer at the Princeton University Art Museum.

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FACULTY HONOR: Tienda elected to National Academy of Education

Marta Tienda, the Maurice P. During Professor of Demographic Studies, a professor of sociology and public affairs, and director of the Program in Latino Studies, has been elected to the National Academy of Education for her outstanding scholarship related to education. The selection of 16 new members was announced Thursday, March 19.

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FACULTY AWARD: Grossman receives Onassis Prize for International Trade

Gene Grossman, the Jacob Viner Professor of International Economics and a professor of economics and international affairs, has been awarded the 2015 Onassis Prize for International Trade in recognition of his contributions to strategic trade policy, environmental economics and the economics of offshoring. The prize, which comes with a $200,000 award, was announced Friday, March 20, in London.

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FACULTY HONOR: Wood elected to National Academy of Engineering for water cycle research

Eric Wood, the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest career honors for engineers. He was recognized by the academy "for development of land surface models and use of remote sensing for hydrologic modeling and prediction." He is among 67 new members and 12 foreign members elected to the academy this year; election reflects significant contribution to engineering research, practice or education.

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FACULTY AWARD: Fisch wins Hannes Alfvén Prize for plasma physics contributions

The European Physical Society (EPS) has named physicist Nathaniel Fisch winner of the 2015 Hannes Alfvén Prize. Fisch, director of the Princeton Program in Plasma Physics and professor and associate chair ofastrophysical sciences at Princeton University, will receive the honor in June at the annual meeting of the EPS Division of Plasma Physics in Lisbon, Portugal. The prize, named for 1970 Nobel Laureate Hannes Alfvén, goes each year to a person who has contributed greatly to the advancement of plasma physics or shows promise of doing so in the future; Fisch is being honored for his fundamental studies of wave-particle interactions and for predicting new plasma phenomena.

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