News at Princeton

Wednesday, Oct. 01, 2014
 Average aid package is $44,700. 95% of this ($42,600) is grant aid and 5% (2,100) is through a campus job.

Princeton University's undergraduate financial aid program ensures that any student who is accepted can afford to attend. The average aid package for a student admitted to the Class of 2018 is $44,700.

 

Featured Story

Princeton's financial aid at a glance

Princeton University's undergraduate financial aid program is recognized as one of the most generous in the country, ensuring that any student who is accepted can afford to attend.

Read Story | All Featured Stories


Other Current Stories

Women don't always find power in numbers

Increasing the number of women in decision-making groups isn't necessarily enough to give them greater power, according to researchers at Princeton University and Brigham Young University.

Read Story

'Supersonic' William Surber, enthusiastic leader in electrical engineering, dies at 94

William Surber Jr., a professor of electrical engineering emeritus at Princeton University known for his enthusiasm for teaching and his research on feedback control systems, died on Aug. 27 at the Meadow Lakes retirement community in East Windsor, New Jersey. He was 94.

Read Story

Community and Staff Day unites students and families for football and fun

Princeton University welcomed thousands of visitors to campus Sept. 27 for the annual Community and Staff Day, organized by the Office of Community and Regional Affairs. This year's activities included a youth sports clinic; a Princeton football game, to which area residents received free tickets; a Family Fun Fest with children's entertainment and crafts and an information fair; and post-game fireworks.

Read Story

Civil liberties examined in context of war

As laws involving American civil liberties have evolved, individuals have needed to be especially vigilant about those rights in wartime, speakers concluded at the "Civil Liberties in Times of War" policy forum held Sept. 18 and 19 in Robertson Hall on the Princeton University campus.

Read Story

Genetic 'instruction set' for antibodies knocks down hepatitis C in mice

A study led by Princeton University researchers found that a triple-punch of antibodies both prevented hepatitis C infection and wiped out the disease after it had established itself in laboratory mice. Instead of delivering the antibodies directly, the researchers administered a genetic "instruction set" that, once in a cell, developed into antibodies that target the portions of the virus that do not mutate.

Read Story

Code the ode: Center for Digital Humanities marries technology and humanistic studies

The new Center for Digital Humanities — "a nexus of engagement with transformative technologies" that will foster and support interdisciplinary projects across the humanities, computer sciences and library sciences — will open with a reception at 4:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, at the center's new home in Green Hall. "Digital humanities brings computational tools such as large-scale databases and text-analysis software to bear on traditional humanities scholarship," said Meredith Martin, associate professor of English and director of the center.

Read Story

Arabic tweets point to U.S. influence as fuel for anti-Americanism

An analysis of millions of Arabic-language tweets confirms high levels of anti-Americanism there, provides new and interesting information about attitudes in the Middle East toward particular U.S. actions, and charts a path for using Twitter to measure public sentiment in ways opinion polls cannot.

Read Story

Nanotechnology leads to better, cheaper LEDs for phones and lighting

Princeton University researchers have developed a new method to increase the brightness, efficiency and clarity of LEDs, which are widely used on smartphones and portable electronics as well as becoming increasingly common in lighting.>

Read Story

Romero named Princeton University's general counsel

Ramona Romero, a lawyer who has held senior positions in government and the private sector and who has been general counsel of the U.S. Department of Agriculture since 2011, will become general counsel at Princeton University effective Dec. 1. Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber announced the appointment Wednesday, Sept. 24.

Read Story

'Solid' light could compute previously unsolvable problems about the behavior of matter

Researchers at Princeton University have begun crystallizing light as part of an effort to answer fundamental questions about the physics of matter.

Read Story

Edward Nelson, nonconformist who sparked a quantum field theory revolution, dies at 82

Princeton University mathematician and professor emeritus Edward Nelson, whose contributions to analysis, probability and mathematical logic advanced all of those subjects and inspired much further research, died Sept. 10 in Princeton due to complications from lymphoma. He was 82.

Read Story

Fall foliage season may be later, but longer on warmer Earth

The fall foliage season in some areas of the United States could come much later and possibly last a little longer by the end of the century as climate change causes summer temperatures to linger later into the year, according to Princeton University researchers. The delay could result in a longer growing season that would affect carbon uptake, agriculture, water supplies and animal behavior, among many other areas.

Read Story

Princeton's commitment to access, diversity embodied in the Class of 2018

Princeton has enrolled its most diverse class in the history of the University, with a record 43 percent of the 1,313 students making up the Class of 2018 coming from various racial and ethnic backgrounds. 

Read Story

Q&A: The threat of ISIS

In a speech last week, President Barack Obama announced that the United States would lead a "broad coalition to roll back this terrorist threat" of the Islamic State, known variously by the acronyms ISIS and ISIL. Writer B. Rose Huber of Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs recently discussed Obama's plan and the threat of ISIS with Jacob Shapiro, associate professor of politics and international affairs at the Wilson School.

Read Story

Neutrino experiment that reaches for the sun has Princeton roots

Princeton University scientists and engineers were directly involved in the recent detection of an elusive subatomic particle forged in the sun's core, which was the crowning achievement of a 25-year international effort to design and build one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors in the world.

Read Story

Faculty approves changes to Princeton sexual misconduct policies and procedures

The Princeton faculty on Monday, Sept. 15, approved changes in the University's policies and procedures for addressing issues related to sexual misconduct. Revisions to incorporate the changes in the booklet Rights, Rules and Responsibilities will be brought to the Council of the Princeton University for consideration at its first regularly scheduled meeting of the year on Sept. 29.

Read Story

Will the real unemployment rate please stand up?

America's unemployment rate — most recently reported as 6.1 percent — has long been used to gauge the country's economic well-being. But a new working paper by Princeton University researchers highlights the difficulty in estimating the exact unemployment rate, though changes in the official measure still signal important movements in the economy.

Read Story

Student Fulbright winners to study and teach abroad

Ten members of Princeton's recently graduated Class of 2014, seven graduate students and five recent alumni have been awarded Fulbright grants to study or teach abroad for the 2014-15 academic year.

Read Story

Academic quality, affordability earn Princeton recognition in national and international rankings

Princeton University continues to be placed in a leading position by national and international college and university rankings for its strength of academic programs, student experience and overall value.

Read Story

PPPL scientists take key step toward solving a major astrophysical mystery

Magnetic reconnection in the Earth and sun's atmospheres can trigger geomagnetic storms that disrupt cell phone service, damage satellites and blackout power grids. In a new paper, scientists at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Princeton University have taken a key step toward understanding this unsolved problem in plasma astrophysics.

Read Story

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama to give public talk at Princeton University

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama will visit Princeton University on Tuesday, Oct. 28, to deliver an address to the entire community and will meet with students and faculty to discuss the meaning of service.

Read Story

Back to school: Princeton students ready for a new year

Princeton University students will officially be back to school Wednesday, Sept. 10, with the first day of classes, following more than a week of orientation and welcome events for undergraduate and graduate students.

Read Story

Southern Ocean's role in climate regulation, ocean health is goal of $21 million federal grant

A six-year, $21 million program by Princeton University and 10 partner institutions will seek to make the importance and health of the Southern Ocean encircling Antarctica better known scientifically and publicly. The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling program, or SOCCOM, will create a biogeochemical and physical portrait of the ocean using an expanded computational capacity and hundreds of robotic floats deployed around Antarctica.

Read Story

Undergraduate socioeconomic diversity working group issues recommendations

A working group on undergraduate socioeconomic diversity, chaired by Dean of the College Valerie Smith, has issued a broad set of recommendations designed to improve academic achievement and create a more inclusive and supportive campus climate for the benefit of all undergraduates. Initially appointed by former President Shirley M. Tilghman, the working group included five faculty members and six administrators representing various segments of the campus community.

Read Story

In one of nature's innovations, a single cell smashes and rebuilds its own genome

A study led by Princeton University researchers found that a pond-dwelling, single-celled organism has the remarkable ability to break its own DNA into nearly a quarter-million pieces and rapidly reassemble those pieces when it's time to mate. This elaborate process could provide a template for understanding how chromosomes in more complex animals such as humans break apart and reassemble, as can happen during the onset of cancer.

Read Story

Eisgruber urges students to fill Princeton story with meaning

Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber welcomed the incoming Class of 2018 at Opening Exercises on Sunday, Sept. 7, urging students to start the first chapter of their Princeton story with a sense of adventure.

Read Story

Students honored at Opening Exercises

Princeton University celebrated the accomplishments of its students with the awarding of four undergraduate prizes at Opening Exercises on Sunday, Sept. 7.

Read Story

University updates guidelines for recent travelers to West Africa

Princeton University continues to monitor the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) travel and health advisories regarding the Ebola outbreak in parts of West Africa. The CDC now recommends that colleges and universities identify faculty, staff and students who have traveled to Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone or Nigeria in the last 21 days to discuss their possible risk for becoming sick and provide instructions for health monitoring.

Read Story

Campus construction efforts include focus on sustainability and housing

Scattered among the peaceful wooded paths across the Princeton University campus, bulldozers and scaffolding hint at the many construction projects underway to support key initiatives such as sustainability, arts education, international experiences and housing.

Read Story

Faculty committee recommends changes in sexual misconduct policies, procedures

The Faculty Advisory Committee on Policy, an elected committee that also serves as the faculty membership of the executive committee of the Council of the Princeton University Community (CPUC), is recommending changes in the University's policies and procedures for addressing issues related to sexual misconduct. 

Read Story

Early cerebellum malfunction hinders neural development, possible root of autism, theory suggests

Princeton University researchers offer a new theory that an early-life injury to the cerebellum disrupts the brain's processing of external and internal information and leads to "developmental diaschisis," wherein a loss of function in one brain region leads to problems in another. Applied to autism, cerebellar injury could hinder how other areas of the brain interpret external stimuli and organize internal processes.

Read Story

FACULTY AWARD: Two Princeton projects among first NIH BRAIN Initiative awards

Two Princeton University projects are among the first group of studies selected by the National Institutes of Health to receive an overall $46 million in funds related to the federal BRAIN Initiative, which aims to map the activity of all the brain's neurons.

Read Story

FACULTY AWARD: Three researchers named Moore Materials Synthesis Investigators

Princeton University researchers Robert Cava, Loren Pfeiffer and Mansour Shayegan are among 12 scientists nationwide to be named Moore Materials Synthesis Investigators by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation in Palo Alto, California. The program is part of the Emergent Phenomena in Quantum Systems (EPiQS) initiative, which has awarded a total of $20.6 million over five years to enable investigators to "dedicate substantial effort to discovery-driven research, such as investigative synthesis of new types of quantum materials." Cava, the Russell Wellman Moore Professor of Chemistry, Pfeiffer, a senior research scholar in electrical engineering, and Shayegan, a professor of electrical engineering, will receive $1.9 million each over the next five years. 

Read Story

FACULTY AWARD: Keohane receives APSA's James Madison Award

Robert Keohane, a professor of international affairs and acting faculty chair of the Master in Public Policy program at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, received the 2014 James Madison Award from the American Political Science Association (APSA). The award, given once every three years, "recognizes an American political scientist who has made a distinguished scholarly contribution to political science."

Read Story

FACULTY AWARD: Devenport named a 2014 Vallee Foundation Young Investigator

Danelle Devenport, a Princeton University assistant professor in the Department of Molecular Biology, is one of four researchers nationwide to receive a 2014 Young Investigator Award from the Bert L and N Kuggie Vallee Foundation in Boston. The $250,000 award recognizes original and innovative biomedical research. Devenport, who studies how cells coordinate collective behaviors over extremely long distances, combines time-lapse imaging with biophysical approaches to understand the signals skin cells use to direct tissue organization and growth.

Read Story