News at Princeton

Sunday, May 03, 2015
 Government in Hard Places Jennifer Widner

This spring, Jennifer Widner (above), professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, introduced an online version of her graduate-level course "Making Government Work in Hard Places." 

 

Featured Story

Tandem classroom-online course aims to create international network of 'builders'

This spring, Jennifer Widner, professor of politics and international affairs at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, introduced an online version of her course "Making Government Work in Hard Places." Offered alongside Widner's traditional graduate-level course with 19 enrolled students, the nine-week online course reached more than 2,000 learners from around the world.

Read Story | All Featured Stories


Other Current Stories

Welcome website for Class of 2019 available

Incoming freshmen and their families can find important information about attending Princeton, as well as interact with University staff and students, via the welcome website Your Path to Princeton.

Read Story

Gravity data show that Antarctic ice sheet is melting increasingly faster

Princeton University researchers "weighed" Antarctica's ice sheet using gravitational satellite data and found that during the past decade, Antarctica's massive ice sheet lost twice the amount of ice in its western portion compared with what it accumulated in the east. Their conclusion — the southern continent's ice cap is melting ever faster.

Read Story

250th Anniversary Fund supports innovation in undergraduate curriculum

Twenty-one faculty proposals to develop new classes or redesign existing courses have received funding this year through Princeton University's 250th Anniversary Fund for Innovation in Undergraduate Education. The fund was established in 1996, in conjunction with Princeton's 250th anniversary, as a means of supporting the University's "central and enduring commitment to outstanding undergraduate teaching."

Read Story

Class snapshot: 'Ebola in 2014: The Science, Society and Politics of a Modern Epidemic'

This spring, students in the class "Ebola in 2014: The Science, Society and Politics of a Modern Epidemic" studied Ebola crisis as it unfolded and learned lessons that can be applied to future public health emergencies. 

Read Story

Semenov named valedictorian, Hannan selected as salutatorian

Misha Semenov, an architecture major from San Francisco, has been selected as valedictorian of Princeton's Class of 2015. Neil Hannan, a classics major from Manhasset, New York, has been named the Latin salutatorian.

Read Story

Senior thesis: A tale of two galaxies and billions of years

Princeton University senior Dayton Martindale, an astrophysical sciences major, took an unusual turn with his senior thesis by constructing a narrative that explores the trajectory, timetable and consequences of the eventual collision of Earth's home galaxy, the Milky Way, and the Andromeda Galaxy. Behind the move is Martindale's love of science and a calling to bring it before the public.

Read Story

Stegosaurus plates provide first solid evidence that male, female dinosaurs looked different

The discovery of a single anatomical difference between males and females of a species of Stegosaurus provides some of the most conclusive evidence that some dinosaurs looked different based on sex, according to new Princeton University research. Existing work had been inconclusive to the point that some paleontologists began to think that male and female dinosaurs did not differ physically from one another.

Read Story

Princeton names inaugural cohort of international Streicker Fellows

Nine Princeton undergraduates will intern and conduct research internationally this summer as the University's first Streicker Fellows.

Read Story

Kruse resets timeline of America as 'One Nation Under God'

Princeton historian Kevin Kruse traces the belief that America is fundamentally and formally a Christian nation to 1930s alliance between businessmen and religious activists opposed to the New Deal.

Read Story

Two teams of Princeton students win Davis Projects for Peace

Two teams of Princeton University students have received $10,000 grants from the Projects for Peace program, which supports new and creative ideas for promoting peace around the world. This summer, seniors Darya Koltunyuk and Stephanie Liu plan to introduce chamber music to young people in New York City; and Haraya Buensuceso, a sophomore, and Jacob Scheer, a senior, aim to bring together budding entrepreneurs to address the issue of climate change in the Philippines.

Read Story

The Rice Crisis: Tracking an asset-price bubble in the check-out line

Princeton economist Harrison Hong has spent much of his career working to understand how and why asset-price bubbles form, studying the dot-com bubble in stock prices from 1997 to 2000 and the run-up in global commodity prices from 2003 to 2008. His latest insights, though, come from the check-out line at your local grocery store.

Read Story

Senior thesis: Breaking ground in East Asian earthquake disaster relief

Hanna Kim's senior thesis, "When Disaster Strikes: A Comparative Study of Civil Society Response to Earthquakes in China and Japan," led her to travel to East Asia over winter break of 2014 to conduct field research. A major in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Kim also is pursuing certificates in East Asian studies and translation and intercultural communication.

Read Story

Princeton consortium formed to visualize Big Data

If a picture is worth a thousands words, a computer graphic is worth millions. With that in mind, Princeton University has formed a consortium that will share efforts to turn mountains of scientific data into eye-friendly computer visualizations.

Read Story

Robertson awarded scholarship for postgraduate study at Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

Princeton senior Jake Robertson has been awarded a St. Andrew's Society Scholarship for postgraduate study at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. He will pursue a master's in classical and contemporary text (acting).

Read Story

Trevino named Graduate School associate dean for diversity and inclusion

Dale Trevino, whose career has focused on promoting diversity in higher education, will become the associate dean for diversity and inclusion at Princeton University's Graduate School. His appointment is effective July 1.

Read Story

Mathematics major Wigderson named Goldwater Scholar

Princeton junior Yuval Wigderson has been awarded a Goldwater Scholarship, the premier award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering.

Read Story

Gonzalez appointed associate dean of the college, will focus on access and inclusion

Khristina Gonzalez has been appointed Princeton University's associate dean of the college for programs of access and inclusion. Gonzalez previously served as associate director of the Princeton Writing Center. Gonzalez, who began her new role this month, is responsible for programs and initiatives within the Office of the Dean of the College (ODOC) that support and advance Princeton's commitment to a diverse and inclusive student body.

Read Story

Princeton junior Roberts awarded Truman Scholarship for public service pursuits

Princeton University junior Thomas Roberts has been awarded a 2015 Truman Scholarship, which provides up to $30,000 for graduate study. Roberts, who is from Morris, Minnesota, is majoring in astrophysical sciences and plans to pursue a master's degree in public policy focused on international and global affairs. The award, which was given to 58 students among 688 candidates nationwide, "recognizes college juniors with exceptional leadership potential who are committed to careers in government, the nonprofit or advocacy sectors, education or elsewhere in the public service."

Read Story

Google chair and alumnus Schmidt stokes student innovation at HackPrinceton

In the age of big data and artificial intelligence, the young generation is poised to revolutionize the way humans and computers interact, said Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, speaking to an audience of more than 500 students from the United States and Canada at the biannual HackPrinceton on campus on Saturday, April 11.

Read Story

Junior Narayanan awarded Beinecke Scholarship for postgraduate study in anthropology

Princeton junior Varshini Narayanan has been awarded a Beinecke Scholarship, which supports promising students in their graduate studies in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

Read Story

$10 million gift from alumnus funds Music Building at Princeton

A Princeton alumnus and his wife have given $10 million for the Music Building that is part of the University's arts complex under construction near University Place and Alexander Street. The building eventually will be named by the donors, who wish to remain anonymous for now.

Read Story

Dale Fellowship winner Clifton will create original play in Serbia

Princeton University senior Katherine Clifton was first inspired to write a play about hostility between the Serbs and Romani people while participating in Princeton's Bridge Year Program. Five years later, she will do just that as the 2015 winner of the Martin Dale Fellowship.

Read Story

I picked Princeton because …

As high school students weigh Princeton's offer of admission to the Class of 2019, a group of undergraduate bloggers for the Office of Admission has been reflecting on why they decided to come to Princeton.

Read Story

Chapel gathering focuses on understanding and overcoming differences

Students, faculty and staff gathered in the University Chapel on Sunday afternoon for a program of speeches and music in which members of the community reflected on ways to understand and overcome their differences. In his welcoming remarks, President Christopher L. Eisgruber said he hoped the gathering “will give us a chance to reflect on problems that confront us, on differences that divide us, and on values that we share."

Read Story

Advanced material for prosthetic limbs scheduled for launch to Space Station

Lenore Rasmussen's dream of developing a synthetic muscle that could be used to make better prosthetic limbs and more responsive robots will literally become airborne at 4:33 p.m. on April 13 when her experiment will rocket off to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral in Florida. Rasmussen, a synthetic polymer chemist and founder of Ras Labs, has worked closely with researchers and engineers at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to develop the material's ability to adhere to metal. 

Read Story

Eisgruber chooses 'Whistling Vivaldi' for Pre-read

Members of Princeton's incoming Class of 2019 will be given their first assignment well before they arrive on campus. President Christopher L. Eisgruber will ask freshmen to read "Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do" by social psychologist Claude Steele for the third year of the Princeton Pre-read, an introduction to the intellectual life of the University that centers on a book read by members of the freshman class and others in the Princeton community.

Read Story

Senior thesis: Study abroad inspires project on languages, education

Abidjan Walker, a comparative literature major from Hanover, New Hampshire, has studied in China, Morocco and Switzerland. Building her linguistic and cultural toolkit sparked her senior thesis, which focuses on the language of instruction in educational systems in these countries.

Read Story

Faculty adopts statement affirming commitment to freedom of expression at Princeton

The Princeton faculty adopted a statement Monday, April 6, affirming the University's commitment to the principles of academic freedom and freedom of expression as essential to the University's educational mission.

Read Story

Class snapshot: 'The New Jim Crow'

This semester, 43 undergraduates are exploring the political development of America's racially disparate crime policy in the course "The New Jim Crow: U.S. Crime Policy from Constitutional Formation to Ferguson," taught by Naomi Murakawa, an associate professor of African American studies. 

Read Story

Benjamin delves into 'discriminatory design' in medical, scientific research

On Jan. 30, Ruha Benjamin, an assistant professor in the Center for African American Studies, blended a sociologist's observational skills and an actor's sense of storytelling in 21-minute TedX Baltimore talk "From the Park Bench to the Lab Bench: What Kind of Future Are We Designing?" — which gives viewers a backstage tour of what she calls "discriminatory design."

Read Story

Scheide donates rare books library to Princeton; collection is largest gift in University's history

Musician, musicologist, bibliophile and philanthropist William H. Scheide, a 1936 Princeton University alumnus who died in November at age 100, has left his extraordinary collection of some 2,500 rare printed books and manuscripts to Princeton University. With an expected appraised value of nearly $300 million, it is the largest gift in the University's history.

Read Story

Princeton University Art Museum names Elderfield distinguished curator, lecturer

John Elderfield, chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, has been named the first Allen R. Adler, Class of 1967, Distinguished Curator and Lecturer at the Princeton University Art Museum.

Read Story

FACULTY HONOR: Burrows, Deaton elected to National Academy of Sciences

Adam Burrows, a professor of astrophysical sciences and director of the Program in Planets and Life, and Angus Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of International Affairs and a professor of economics and international affairs, have been elected members of the National Academy of Sciences. They were among 84 new members and 21 foreign associates elected Tuesday, April 28, in recognition of their achievements in original research.

Read Story

FACULTY AWARD: Martin receives New Directions Fellowship

Meredith Martin, associate professor of English and director of the Digital Humanities Center, has been awarded a New Directions Fellowship from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The fellowship provides support to early career scholars in the humanities for advanced training in pursuit of a specific research agenda. Martin will expand her expertise in late 19th-century poetry through an innovative plan of interdisciplinary humanistic study.

Read Story

NEWS BRIEF: Three graduate students awarded Rome Prize in arts and humanities

Three Princeton graduate students have been awarded the Luciano Berio Rome Prize. Katharine Huemoeller is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Classics, and her scholarship focuses on Greek and Roman social history, Roman law and gender in the ancient world. Mali Skotheim, also in classics, is writing her dissertation on Greek dramatic festivals under the Roman Empire. John Lansdowne, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Art and Archaeology and a Seeger Fellow in the Center for Hellenic Studies, specializes in medieval and early Renaissance art, with a particular focus on the exchange of objects and images between Italy and the eastern Mediterranean world.

Read Story

FACULTY HONOR: Weiss named Andrew Carnegie Fellow

Max Weiss, an associate professor of history and Near Eastern studies, has been named to the inaugural class of Andrew Carnegie Fellows. Each of the 32 scholars in the social sciences and humanities will receive up to $200,000 to support research and writing. Weiss specializes in the social, cultural and intellectual history of the modern Middle East. His research interests include transformations of law and society, religious culture, history of ideas, and the translation of contemporary Arabic literature into English.

Read Story

FACULTY HONOR: Three Princeton professors inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Three Princeton University professors were among 197 influential artists, scientists, scholars, authors and institutional leaders inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The inductees from Princeton are: Sanjeev Arora, the Charles C. Fitzmorris Professor in Computer Science; Martin Gilens, professor of politics; and Ali Yazdani, professor of physics. Founded in 1780, the academy is one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious learned societies. The new class will be inducted at a ceremony on Oct. 10 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Read Story