News at Princeton

Sunday, March 29, 2015
 Nash

Princeton University mathematician John Nash received the 2015 Abel Prize from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for his seminal work on partial differential equations, which are used to describe the basic laws of scientific phenomena. The award is one of the most prestigious in the field of mathematics and includes an $800,000 prize. Nash shares the prize with longtime colleague Louis Nirenberg, a professor emeritus at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

 

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A 'long awaited recognition': Nash receives Abel Prize for revered work in mathematics

Princeton University mathematician John Nash received the 2015 Abel Prize from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for his seminal work on partial differential equations, which are used to describe the basic laws of scientific phenomena. The award is one of the most prestigious in the field of mathematics and includes an $800,000 prize. Nash shares the prize with longtime colleague Louis Nirenberg, a professor emeritus at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

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Schmidt fund awards promote new technologies in computation and health

Two exploratory and promising research projects — a quantum computer based on a recently observed exotic particle and a smartphone that could replace laboratory tests in healthcare settings — have been awarded funding at Princeton University through the Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund.

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Vice president for campus life search committee formed

A committee has been formed to search for Princeton University's next vice president for campus life. Cynthia Cherrey has announced she will step down from the role in August to become president and chief executive officer of the International Leadership Association (ILA).

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Antibiotic effectiveness imperiled as use in livestock expected to increase 67 percent by 2030

Princeton University-led research found that antibiotic consumption in livestock worldwide could rise by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030, and possibly endanger the effectiveness of antimicrobials in humans.

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A 'long awaited recognition': Nash receives Abel Prize for revered work in mathematics

Princeton University mathematician John Nash received the 2015 Abel Prize from the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for his seminal work on partial differential equations, which are used to describe the basic laws of scientific phenomena. The award is one of the most prestigious in the field of mathematics and includes an $800,000 prize. Nash shares the prize with longtime colleague Louis Nirenberg, a professor emeritus at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

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President Eisgruber appoints search committee for new dean of the college

President Christopher L. Eisgruber has formed a committee to search for a successor to Valerie Smith, who is stepping down as Princeton's dean of the college at the end of the academic year to become president of Swarthmore College.  

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Senior Falcon awarded Michel David-Weill Scholarship for study at Sciences Po

Princeton University senior Eric Falcon has been awarded the 2015 Michel David-Weill Scholarship to pursue a master's degree in European affairs at Sciences Po in Paris.

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Fernández-Kelly shines light on overlooked communities

The people of West Baltimore populate Princeton sociologist Patricia Fernández-Kelly's recently released book, "The Hero's Fight: African Americans in West Baltimore and the Shadow of the State."

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Princeton falls to Maryland in NCAA tourney, finishes season 31-1

The University of Maryland defeated Princeton University 85-70 on Monay evening in the second round of the NCAA women's basketball tournament. The defeat was the first of the year for Coach Courtney Banghart and the Tigers, who finished the season 31-1.

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Class snapshot: 'The Artist at Work'

This spring, 13 Princeton undergraduates are exploring the artist's studio from historical, contemporary, physical and conceptual perspectives in "The Artist at Work." The instructor is Irene Small, assistant professor of art and archaeology, who teaches courses on modernism and contemporary art and criticism in a global context.

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Princeton employees honored for dedication and service

Six Princeton staff members were recognized for their commitment to excellence and exceptional performance during the University's annual Service Recognition Luncheon on March 16 in Jadwin Gymnasium. In addition, two staff members were honored for their leadership potential.

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Postmodernist architect Michael Graves, 'compassionate teacher' and 'humanist designer,' dies

Michael Graves, the Robert Schirmer Professor of Architecture Emeritus at Princeton University and a renowned architect and designer, died of natural causes on March 12 at his home in Princeton, New Jersey. He was 80.

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Cropping Africa's wet savannas would bring high environmental costs

With the global population rising, analysts and policymakers have targeted Africa's vast wet savannas as a place to produce staple foods and bioenergy groups at low environmental costs. But a new study led by Princeton researchers finds that converting Africa's wet savannas into farmland would come at a high environmental cost and fail to meet some existing standards for renewable fuels.

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Burrus named director of corporate and foundation relations

Coleen Burrus, an institutional advancement professional with more than 25 years of experience spanning the higher education, philanthropic, corporate and government sectors, has been appointed director of corporate and foundation relations at Princeton University. Her appointment is effective April 27.

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No increased meningitis B risk at Princeton

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced this week that the risk of meningitis B at Princeton University is the same as at any other university. Ninety-eight percent of Princeton undergraduates have received at least one dose of the meningitis B vaccine and there have been no cases of serogroup B meningococcal disease occurring on campus or affecting Princeton students since November 2013.

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Ebola outbreak of 2014 may have laid tracks for deadly measles epidemic in Africa

Princeton University and Johns Hopkins University researchers report that the African countries most affected by the 2014 Ebola outbreak could now be highly susceptible to measles epidemics due to severe disruptions in routine health care such as vaccinations.

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Frontier beneath our feet: Seismic study aims to map Earth's interior in 3-D

Princeton geosciences professor Jeroen Tromp and his team have embarked on an ambitious project to use earthquakes to map the Earth's entire mantle, the semisolid rock that stretches to a depth of 1,800 miles, about halfway down to the planet's center and about 300 times deeper than humans have drilled.

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Princeton women's basketball finishes historic 30-0 season, heads to NCAA tournament

The Princeton women's basketball team defeated Pennsylvania 55-42 on Tuesday evening, closing out the regular season with a historic 30-0 record. Princeton finished with the best regular season record ever for any Ivy League men's or women's basketball team.

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Benjamin delves into 'discriminatory design' in medical, scientific research

On Jan. 30, Ruha Benjamin, an assistant professor in the Center for African American Studies, blended a sociologist's observational skills and an actor's sense of storytelling in 21-minute TedX Baltimore talk "From the Park Bench to the Lab Bench: What Kind of Future Are We Designing?" — which gives viewers a backstage tour of what she calls "discriminatory design."

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Tank receives Brain Prize for advance in microscopy

David Tank, the Henry L. Hillman Professor in Molecular Biology at Princeton, has been named one of four winners of the Brain Prize, an honor that recognizes scientists who have made outstanding contributions to brain research.

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Lisanti: Perspective on the nature of dark matter

Mariangela Lisanti's science career started in high school in Connecticut when she cold-called physics professors asking for the chance to do research in their labs. Her persistence and enthusiasm paid off, and her work led her in 2002 to be named one of MIT Tech Review's "top innovators under 35" — at only 18 years old. In 2013, Lisanti joined the Princeton faculty as an assistant professor of physics.

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Paul Simon speaks about his career and the role of art in society

Internationally renowned singer-songwriter Paul Simon visited Princeton University on Tuesday, March 3, talking about his career in a discussion facilitated by Paul Muldoon, the Howard G. B. Clark '21 University Professor in the Humanities and a professor of creative writing in the Lewis Center for the Arts. The Grammy Award-winning artist also offered an impromptu performance to a capacity audience of over 800, made up of mostly students joined by faculty and staff at Richardson Auditorium. The event was presented by the Lewis Center's Performance Central.

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Heaney appointed deputy vice president for development

Kevin Heaney, who has worked in fundraising leadership positions for nearly 20 years, has been named deputy vice president for development at Princeton University. His appointment is effective March 9.

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Forum advanced many ideas from lab to market in 10-year history

The Innovation Forum, an annual presentation of technology developed by the University's professors, graduate students and researchers, is sponsored by the Keller Center and the Office of Technology Licensing. Now celebrating its 10th year, the forum has helped launch a wide range of projects from new biomedical devices to high-tech imagers and cameras.

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New approach to cancer therapy takes top prize at Innovation Forum

At the Keller Center's 10th annual Innovation Forum on Feb. 25, Mark Esposito, a Princeton University graduate student in molecular biology took the top prize with his pitch for a method to stop the spread of cancer.

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Scheide donates rare books library to Princeton; collection is largest gift in University's history

Musician, musicologist, bibliophile and philanthropist William H. Scheide, a 1936 Princeton University alumnus who died in November at age 100, has left his extraordinary collection of some 2,500 rare printed books and manuscripts to Princeton University. With an expected appraised value of nearly $300 million, it is the largest gift in the University's history.

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Princeton University Art Museum names Elderfield distinguished curator, lecturer

John Elderfield, chief curator emeritus of painting and sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City, has been named the first Allen R. Adler, Class of 1967, Distinguished Curator and Lecturer at the Princeton University Art Museum.

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FACULTY HONOR: Tienda elected to National Academy of Education

Marta Tienda, the Maurice P. During Professor of Demographic Studies, a professor of sociology and public affairs, and director of the Program in Latino Studies, has been elected to the National Academy of Education for her outstanding scholarship related to education. The selection of 16 new members was announced Thursday, March 19.

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FACULTY AWARD: Grossman receives Onassis Prize for International Trade

Gene Grossman, the Jacob Viner Professor of International Economics and a professor of economics and international affairs, has been awarded the 2015 Onassis Prize for International Trade in recognition of his contributions to strategic trade policy, environmental economics and the economics of offshoring. The prize, which comes with a $200,000 award, was announced Friday, March 20, in London.

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FACULTY HONOR: Wood elected to National Academy of Engineering for water cycle research

Eric Wood, the Susan Dod Brown Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest career honors for engineers. He was recognized by the academy "for development of land surface models and use of remote sensing for hydrologic modeling and prediction." He is among 67 new members and 12 foreign members elected to the academy this year; election reflects significant contribution to engineering research, practice or education.

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FACULTY AWARD: Fisch wins Hannes Alfvén Prize for plasma physics contributions

The European Physical Society (EPS) has named physicist Nathaniel Fisch winner of the 2015 Hannes Alfvén Prize. Fisch, director of the Princeton Program in Plasma Physics and professor and associate chair ofastrophysical sciences at Princeton University, will receive the honor in June at the annual meeting of the EPS Division of Plasma Physics in Lisbon, Portugal. The prize, named for 1970 Nobel Laureate Hannes Alfvén, goes each year to a person who has contributed greatly to the advancement of plasma physics or shows promise of doing so in the future; Fisch is being honored for his fundamental studies of wave-particle interactions and for predicting new plasma phenomena.

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University contributions to Princeton town

Summary of the many ways in which Princeton University currently contributes to and engages with the Princeton community. Submitted in a memo by President Christopher L. Eisgruber to the Princeton mayor and council on Oct. 28, 2014.

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