News at Princeton

Friday, Oct. 31, 2014
 Halloween index

 

 

Featured Story

Happy Halloween From Princeton University

On Halloween, mysterious things happen at Princeton, the home of the orange and black.

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Other Current Stories

Members appointed to new advisory committee on sexual misconduct

Princeton University faculty, staff and students have been appointed to the new Faculty-Student Committee on Sexual Misconduct and the group expects to hold its first meeting sometime in November. The committee serves as an advisory group regarding Princeton's work to prevent sexual misconduct, assure effective implementation of sexual misconduct policies and support students in compliance with the University's obligations under federal Title IX requirements.

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Online learners join Princeton students in 'Global History Lab'

Watch this video for an introduction to the "Global History Lab," an online course that allows participants from around the world to join Princeton undergraduates on a journey through world history.

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Wage disclosures for public officials lead to salary cuts, high turnover rates

In the era of big data, transparency has become a popular policy tool for addressing potential problems. But publicly disclosing personal information — such as government officials' income — may result in unintended consequences.  

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Turning loss to gain: cutting power could dramatically boost laser output

Lasers — devices that deliver beams of highly organized light — are so deeply integrated into modern technology that their basic operations would seem well understood. CD players, medical diagnostics and military surveillance all depend on lasers. Re-examining longstanding beliefs about the physics of these devices, Princeton engineers have now shown that carefully restricting the delivery of power to certain areas within a laser could boost its output by many orders of magnitude.

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What makes a tumor switch from dormant to malignant?

Cancer constantly wages war on the human body. Battles are won, lost or sometimes end in a stalemate. This stalemate, known as tumor dormancy, is extremely difficult to study in both cellular and animal models. A new computational model developed in the laboratory of Salvatore Torquato, a professor of chemistry at Princeton University, offers a way to probe the conditions surrounding tumor dormancy and the switch to a malignant state.

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Princeton launches new initiatives to increase socioeconomic diversity

Princeton has launched two new initiatives that aim to further increase the socioeconomic diversity of its student body and the range of students at Princeton who major in fields related to science and technology. The two initiatives fulfill commitments that were made this past January by President Christopher L. Eisgruber when he participated in a White House summit that sought to increase college opportunities for low-income and disadvantaged students nationwide. The University also has expanded its efforts to identify and recruit students from low-income and disadvantaged backgrounds.

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Princeton celebrates international partnership with 'University of Tokyo Day'

The presidents and other top officials from the University of Tokyo and Princeton University celebrated and deepened their research and teaching partnership in discussions on the Princeton campus Thursday, Oct. 23.

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Two years after Hurricane Sandy, recognition of Princeton's microgrid still surges

In the nearly two years since Hurricane Sandy hit New Jersey, attention has fallen on Princeton University's "microgrid," an efficient on-campus power generation and delivery network that remained active while surrounding areas lost power for days, as a national example of how to keep power running for residents, emergency workers and crucial facilities when the next disaster strikes.

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TigerHub is new course planning, academic information site

Princeton University will launch a new online student portal, TigerHub, where undergraduate and graduate students plan and enroll in courses, access academic records and maintain personal information. TigerHub will launch the first week of November at www.princeton.edu/tigerhub and will replace the homepage of SCORE (the Student Course Online Registration Engine).

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Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Researchers from Princeton University and other institutions may have hit upon an answer to a climate-change puzzle that has eluded scientists for years, namely why glaciers in the Karakoram range of the Himalayas have remained stable and even increased in mass while glaciers nearby and worldwide have been receding. Understanding the "Karakoram anomaly" could help gauge the future availability of water for hundreds of millions of people.

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Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections

When it comes to the brain, "more is better" seems like an obvious assumption. But in the case of synapses, which are the connections between brain cells, too many or too few can both disrupt brain function. Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-San Diego recently found an immune-system protein that moonlights in the nervous system to help regulate the number of synapses, and could play an unexpected role in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes and autism.

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'Coming Back' conference brings together University's black alumni

The "Coming Back: Reconnecting Princeton's Black Alumni" conference, held Oct. 16-18, offered Princeton University's black alumni the opportunity to return to campus to participate in intellectual and social offerings. More than 750 undergraduate and graduate alumni and guests attended the conference — representing classes from 1962 to 2014, coming from more than 30 states and at least six other nations.

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Alumni conference panels explore the black experience at Princeton

The "Coming Back: Reconnecting Princeton's Black Alumni" conference held Oct. 16-18 at Princeton University featured a variety of panel discussions with Princeton faculty, alumni, graduate students and undergraduates on topics including the changing social climate on campus, the role of the Center for African American Studies and affirmative action.

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Toni Morrison papers to reside at Princeton

The papers of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison are now part of the permanent library collections of Princeton University, where the renowned author served on the faculty for 17 years.

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Princeton endowment earns 19.6 percent return

For the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2014, Princeton University's endowment earned a 19.6 percent investment gain. The endowment value stood at $21.0 billion, an increase of about $2.8 billion from the previous year. The 10-year average return on the endowment, which grew to 10.5 percent, places the University's endowment among the top percentile of 520 institutions reporting to the Trust Universe Comparison Service.

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Q&A: How to tackle Ebola's tough ethical questions

Princeton public-health researcher Jason Schwartz explores some of the tough ethical questions that have emerged from the Ebola outbreak that has killed thousands in West Africa and spread concern around the world.

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Senior thesis research: Coming back from the field

Princeton undergraduates span the globe to conduct research for their senior theses, often delving deeply into their projects the summer before the start of senior year. The Office of Undergraduate Research invited members of the Class of 2015 to share their research experiences of the past summer, from locations such as the Shanghai theater district and the Cascade Range mountains of Washington state.

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Middlekauff named executive in residence to support tech-transfer experience

Princeton University's Office of Technology Licensing has named W. Bradford Middlekauff as its first executive in residence, a position aimed at offering an entrepreneurial and industry-based perspective to the faculty and students involved in the transfer of University discoveries to the marketplace.

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Board approves 20 appointments to Princeton faculty

The Princeton University Board of Trustees has approved the appointments of 20 faculty members, including one full professor and 19 assistant professors.

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Princeton faculty approves changes to grading policy

The Princeton faculty on Monday, Oct. 6, approved changes to the University's undergraduate grading policy that include removing numerical targets and replacing them with grading standards developed and articulated by each department.

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Historic New Jersey maps show state's evolution

With beautiful illustrations and incredible detail, a Princeton University exhibition of maps, engravings and photographs shows New Jersey's evolution from the 17th century to the present. Located in the Main Gallery of Firestone Library, the exhibition is titled "Nova Caesarea: A Cartographic Record of the Garden State, 1666-1888" and runs through Jan. 25.

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Capping decades of searching, Princeton scientists observe elusive particle that is its own antiparticle

Princeton University scientists have observed an exotic particle that behaves simultaneously like matter and antimatter, a feat of math and engineering that could eventually enable powerful computers based on quantum mechanics.

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Meetup offers a new way to 'HireTigers'

On a recent sunny Friday, hundreds of Princeton University students mingled with employers representing a variety of fields under a large tent behind the Office of Career Services. The inaugural HireTigers Meetup was an alternative to traditional career fairs as Career Services reimagines its programs to foster new and more meaningful connections between students and employers.

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Recessions result in lower birth rates in the long run

New research from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs shows that women who were in their early 20s during the Great Recession will likely have fewer children in both the short and long term. Past recessions have resulted in an increase in the number of women who remain childless at age 40.

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Zaera-Polo steps down as dean of Princeton's School of Architecture

Alejandro Zaera-Polo has stepped down from the deanship of Princeton University's School of Architecture to devote greater attention to his research and other professional activities.  

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FACULTY HONOR: Glaude elected vice president of American Academy of Religion

Eddie Glaude Jr., the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies and chair of the Center for African American Studies, has been elected as vice president of the American Academy of Religion.

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FACULTY AWARD: Sundaresan receives Humboldt Research Award for lifetime achievement

Sankaran Sundaresan, a Princeton University professor of chemical and biological engineering, has been chosen to receive a Humboldt Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, in recognition of lifetime achievements in research. The award is presented to up to 100 non-German scientists each year who are nominated by their peers in Germany. Sundaresan, whose work involves transport phenomena and process engineering, is invited to spend up to a year cooperating on a long-term research research project with colleagues at an institution in Germany.

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FACULTY HONOR: Six Princeton professors inducted to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Six Princeton University professors were among 164 influential artists, scientists, scholars, authors and institutional leaders inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Oct. 11. The inductees from Princeton are: Neta Bahcall, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Astronomy and professor of astrophysical sciences; Charles Cameron, professor of politics and public affairs; Janet Currie, the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs and chair of economics; David Gabai, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Mathematics and department chair; Susan Naquin, professor of history and East Asian studies, emeritus; and Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, emeritus. Founded in 1780, the academy is one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious learned societies.

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FACULTY AWARD: Petry receives 2014 Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering

Princeton University faculty member Sabine Petry, an assistant professor of molecular biology, was one of 18 early-career researchers nationwide to receive a 2014 Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

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FACULTY AWARD: Princeton physicists receive $7.2 million for quantum-materials research

Four Princeton University physicists were among 19 scientists nationwide to receive five-year, $1.8 million awards from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation intended to support "ambitious, high-risk research" in quantum materials: M. Zahid Hasan, a professor of physics; Nai Phuan Ong, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics and director of the Princeton Center for Complex Materials; Jason Petta, an associate professor of physics; and Ali Yazdani, a professor of physics.

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FACULTY AWARD: Three Princeton researchers named NIH New Innovators

Three Princeton University researchers have received 2014 Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health: Timothy Buschman, an assistant professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute (PNI); Michael McAlpine, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering; and Mala Murthy, an assistant professor of molecular biology and PNI. The awards support innovative work by early-career scientists.

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FACULTY AWARD: Singer receives Moore Foundation award for data-driven discovery

Amit Singer, a Princeton University professor of mathematics and the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, was one of 14 researchers nationwide selected for a five-year, $1.5 million Investigators in Data-Driven Discovery award from the California-based Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

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AWARD: Two postdocs receive 2014 Blavatnik Regional Award honors

Recent Princeton University postdoctoral researchers Jeremy Palmer, of chemical and biological engineering, and Knut Drescher, of molecular biology, received 2014 Blavatnik Regional Awards for Young Scientists, which recognize outstanding postdoctoral scientists in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut.

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