News at Princeton

Tuesday, March 28, 2017
 Princeton Profiles: Camden Olson sitting on bench with dog

Camden Olson — shown with Snoopy, a service dog in training — is pursuing a major in ecology and evolutionary biology and a career working with service animals. She took a gap year before coming to Princeton, during which she trained her first service dog. (Video still from Danielle Alio, Office of Communications)

 

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Princeton Profiles: Camden Olson, training service dogs to change lives

Camden Olson, a sophomore ecology and evolutionary biology major, wants to dedicate her career to helping those with disabilities by raising and training service dogs.

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From elegy to lyric, poet Stewart explores nature, love and memory in 'Cinder'

Susan Stewart is the Avalon Foundation University Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English. Her newest book, "Cinder" (Graywolf Press, 2017) is her first retrospective of new and selected poems.

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Senior Wenger awarded Keasbey Scholarship for study in Britain

Senior Ayelet Wenger has been awarded the Keasbey Scholarship, which provides the opportunity to study at selected British universities. Wenger, of Columbus, Ohio, is a classics major who is also pursuing certificates in Judaic studies and Hellenic studies. She will pursue an M.Phil. in Judaism and Christianity in the Graeco-Roman World at the University of Oxford.

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University to administer third 'We Speak' sexual misconduct awareness survey

Completing a three-year effort, Princeton University will again survey undergraduate and graduate students about their knowledge and experiences of inappropriate sexual behavior and about their awareness of University policies, procedures and resources.

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Labyrinth Books: How a vibrant bookstore connects campus and community

For nearly a decade, Princeton University has worked with Nassau Street retailer Labyrinth Books to offer an independent community bookstore for students, faculty, staff and local residents alike. In this Q&A, co-owner Dorothea von Moltke shares her thoughts on how and why this unique collaboration has been able to evolve and thrive.

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Religious Life conference responds to international refugee crisis

"Who are we without welcome?" That was the question asked at the recent conference "Seeking Refuge: Faith-Based Approaches to Forced Migration" organized by Princeton University's Office of Religious Life and the international Catholic organization Community of Sant'Egidio. The interfaith interdisciplinary conference, held on Princeton's campus March 3-4, convened 300 people from across the world to discuss the international refugee crisis and issues related to forced migration.

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Bridge Year Program to offer new program in Indonesia

Princeton University's Bridge Year Program will launch a new program site in Indonesia in the 2017-18 academic year. The site, based in the Special Region of Yogyakarta, will be offered in addition to existing Bridge Year locations in Bolivia, China, India and Senegal.

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Dean for Research Innovation Funds awarded to highly exploratory projects

A number of innovative research projects ranging from the sciences to the arts and engineering have been granted funding through Princeton's Office of the Dean for Research.

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Alumnus Kemeny receives Hertz Fellowship for graduate study in geochemistry

Preston Cosslett Kemeny, a 2015 Princeton graduate, is one of TK college seniors and first-year graduate students nationwide to be named 2017 Hertz Fellows by the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation. The fellows, who were selected from more than TK applicants, will receive a stipend and full tuition support valued at $250,000 for up to five years of graduate study in the applied physical, biological and engineering sciences.

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Neurons deep in brain during learning reveal surprising level of activity

An international team of researchers has learned something surprising about the cerebellum, which despite its small size contains roughly half of all the neurons in the brain. These neurons, which were thought to fire only rarely as they take in information from the senses, are in fact far more active than previously suspected. The finding, published March 20 in the journal Nature Neuroscience, may signal a major shift in our understanding of how the cerebellum encodes information. 

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Fung Forum ends with a call for critical thinking in the digital age

On day two of the 2017 Princeton-Fung Global Forum, Tuesday, March 21, in Berlin, policy experts, journalists and academics continued conversations about democracy in the digital age.

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Faculty awarded funding for innovative education research projects

Six Princeton University faculty members will receive funding to work on innovative, cross-disciplinary education research projects over the next two academic years.

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Jacobus Fellows' research spans empathy to superconductivity

Princeton's four Jacobus Fellows and their advisers describe the research that earned them the University's top honor for graduate students. 

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University employees keep campus running during snowstorm

When Winter Storm Stella hit Princeton on March 14, the University's essential services employees worked across campus to clear roads and parking lots, shovel sidewalks, feed students and staff, keep buildings powered and much more.

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Eliminating competition: Poison and mating regulate male-roundworm populations

In many species, mating comes at the steep price of an organism's life, an evolutionary process intended to regulate reproductive competition. But Princeton University researchers report that males of the roundworm species Caenorhabditis elegans have doubled down with two methods of checking out after reproducing — a lethal gene activated after mating, and pheromones released by other males. The findings provide insight into how aging, longevity and population are naturally regulated for different species and sexes.

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Committee issues pilot recommendations for undergraduate dining

The Princeton University Board Plan Review Committee has developed initial recommendations to enhance the dining experience for undergraduates starting in fall 2017. The changes will be implemented as a one-year pilot program and will inform the committee's ongoing review of undergraduate board plans.

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Innovations in building intelligent cities

Researchers like Bou-Zeid and others in Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science are exploring new ways to build urban infrastructures to serve our growing population, changing civilization and warming planet.

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Winning 'hearts and minds' in Afghanistan carries risks for civilians

The international community has poured billions of dollars into aid, services and protection for civilians in Afghanistan, hoping that winning their support would help the fight against insurgents.  But new research shows that strategy has an unintended consequence: villages where residents support the international forces are more likely to face attacks from the Taliban-led insurgency. 

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Researchers create 'time crystals' envisioned by Princeton scientists

Theories developed at Princeton University led to the creation of time crystals reported in the journal Nature March 9 by two groups of researchers based at Harvard University and the University of Maryland. Time crystals feature atoms and molecules arranged across space and time and are opening up entirely new ways to think about the nature of matter. They also eventually may help protect information in futuristic devices known as quantum computers.

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'Princeton Portraits' focuses on diverse backgrounds of University administrators

The University unveiled the "Princeton Portraits" project Monday on a website that, in a multimedia display of the University's commitment to diversity and inclusion, showcases the varied backgrounds and perspectives of 32 campus administrators.

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Carles Vallhonrat, 'insightful and engaged' architect and 'beloved' teacher, dies at 89

Carles Vallhonrat, lecturer with rank of professor in the School of Architecture at Princeton University and founder of the original Louis I. Kahn Archive, died at home in Haverford, Pennsylvania, on Feb. 21. He was 89.

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Sara Judge named deputy vice president for development at Princeton University

Sara Judge, whose career has spanned executive and consulting roles in education, fundraising, finance and U.S.-China relations, will join the advancement leadership team at Princeton University as deputy vice president for development. Her appointment is effective April 3.

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Asian pollution, heat waves worsen US smog

An influx of pollution from Asia in the western United States and more frequent heat waves in the eastern U.S. are responsible for the persistence of smog in these regions over the past quarter century despite laws curtailing the emission of smog-forming chemicals from automobile tailpipes and factories.

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FACULTY HONOR: Kunzel, Zelizer elected to Society of American Historians

The Society of American Historians has elected Regina Kunzel, the Doris Stevens Professor in Women's Studies who teaches in the Department of History and the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Julian Zelizer, the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes, Class of 1941 Professor of History and Public Affairs, as new members, recognizing the literary and scholarly distinction of their historical writings.

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FACULTY AWARD: Trussell honored for research by Society of Family Planning

The Society of Family Planning has awarded its 2017 Lifetime Achievement award to James Trussell, the Charles and Marie Robertson Professor of Public and International Affairs, Emeritus, and professor of economics and public affairs, emeritus, in recognition of his work promoting the advancement of science within family planning. 

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FACULTY AWARD: Deaton recognized for contributions to understanding of Indian region

Maharana of the Mewar Charitable Foundation of Udaipur, India, has awarded the 2017 Colonel James Tod Award to Angus Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of International Affairs, Emeritus, professor of economics and international affairs, emeritus, and senior scholar. Deaton received the award for his contributions to the understanding of Udaipur, a region in western India where he conducted research to understand developments in economics of health and health care among adults and children.

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FACULTY AWARD: Composers Trueman and Snyder recognized by New Jersey State Council on the Arts

Daniel Trueman, professor of music, and Jeff Snyder, associate research scholar and lecturer in music, have received 2017 Individual Artist Fellowship Awards from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts for their work in music composition. The fellowships are competitive awards to New Jersey artists in 12 disciplines that rotate each year, and are granted based on an anonymous panel review process focused exclusively on artistic quality. The program is carried out in partnership with the Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation. Trueman and Snyder received $8,600 each.

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FACULTY HONOR: Widner appointed to Commission on State Fragility, Growth and Development

Jennifer Widner, professor of politics and international affairs and director of Innovations for Successful Societies, has been appointed to the new Commission on State Fragility, Growth and Development, chaired by former British Prime Minister David Cameron. The commission, established under the auspices of the International Growth Centre, will guide policy on economic growth in fragile and conflict situations.

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FACULTY AWARD: Fiske recognized for lifetime achievement in psychological research

Susan Fiske, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology and professor of psychology and public affairs, has been selected as a recipient of the 2017 James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award, which is given annually by the Association for Psychological Science (APS) to honor members for their lifetime of outstanding contributions in applied psychological research. Fiske and two other Cattell honorees will be recognized at the APS annual convention May 25-28 in Boston.

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