News at Princeton

Saturday, May 30, 2015
 Reunions 2015 Arellano, Royster, Leon

Nearly 25,000 Princeton University alumni, family and friends are on campus for Reunions 2015. The event began Thursday, May 28, and will run through Sunday, May 31. Above: Class of 2010 graduate Monica Ramirez de Arellano (left), who interviews prospective students in Brazil via video, joined Michael Royster, a 1964 alumnus and founder of the alumni club in Brazil, and Craig Leon, a member of the Class of 1985 — both residents of Brazil — to accept the S. Barksdale Penick Jr. '25 Award at the annual alumni awards reception.  

 

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Alumni enjoy camaraderie and connections at Reunions 2015

Nearly 25,000 Princeton University alumni and friends are on campus for Reunions 2015. The event began Thursday, May 28, and will end Sunday, May 31.

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Committee recommends initiatives to foster entrepreneurship 'the Princeton way'

The Princeton Entrepreneurship Advisory Committee (PEAC) has issued a report recommending a broad set of initiatives to enhance entrepreneurship at the University in a way that builds on Princeton's commitments to liberal arts education, research and public service.

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Fung fellows to focus on ethnic politics and identities

Six exceptional early-career scholars from around the world will come to Princeton University in the fall to begin a year of research, writing and collaboration as the third cohort of Fung Global Fellows.

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Melissa Lane, Harvey Rosen to receive Phi Beta Kappa teaching awards

The Princeton University chapter of Phi Beta Kappa will give its annual awards for excellence in undergraduate teaching to Melissa Lane, the Class of 1943 Professor of Politics, and Harvey Rosen, the John L. Weinberg Professor of Economics and Business Policy. 

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Students on cybersecurity task force weigh policy options

"Cybersecurity: Attacks and Consequences," a class offered in the format of a policy task force at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs this spring, sought to evaluate the need to address the public harm caused by cyberattacks and to offer recommendations to policymakers.

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A 'tragic but meaningful' life: Legendary Princeton mathematician John Nash dies

John Nash Jr., a legendary fixture of Princeton University's Department of Mathematics renowned for his breakthrough work in mathematics and game theory as well as for his struggle with mental illness, died with his wife, Alicia, in an automobile accident in Monroe Township, New Jersey, May 23. He was 86.

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Monica Ponce de Leon named dean of Princeton's School of Architecture

Monica Ponce de Leon, a pioneering educator and award-winning architect, has been selected as the next dean of Princeton University's School of Architecture. Her appointment is effective Jan. 1, 2016.

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Bridge Year alumni: Where are they now?

In fall 2009, 20 students became pioneers of Princeton University's Bridge Year Program. They journeyed across the world to spend nine months before their freshman year doing community service work, learning new languages and experiencing cultures and customs unknown to them. Today, those students are young alumni one year out of Princeton whose experiences on campus and paths after graduation were influenced by their participation in Bridge Year.

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Princeton to honor four exceptional New Jersey secondary school teachers

Princeton University will honor four exceptional New Jersey secondary school teachers at its 2015 Commencement on Tuesday, June 2.

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Force of nature: Valedictorian Semenov sees architecture through socio-ecological lens

An architecture major who is also completing certificates in urban studies and translation and intercultural communication, Misha Semenov is the valedictorian of the Class of 2015. He will deliver an address at the University's Commencement ceremony on June 2.

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Salutatorian Hannan embraces Princeton's breadth with a grounding in classics

Neil Hannan found a home in the Department of Classics when he arrived at Princeton University four years ago. At Commencement on Tuesday, June 2, he will deliver a speech in Latin as salutatorian of the Class of 2015.

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Seven graduate students celebrated for excellence in teaching

The Graduate School has honored seven graduate students for its annual Teaching Awards in recognition of their outstanding abilities as teachers.

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Funding allocated to begin implementing diversity task force recommendations

The executive committee of the Council of the Princeton University Community has endorsed recommendations made by a Special Task Force on Diversity, Equity and Inclusion to improve University policies, practices and programming. The University will begin implementing some of the recommendations immediately.

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Four faculty members honored for excellence in mentoring graduate students

Four Princeton University faculty members have been named recipients of the Graduate Mentoring Awards by the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning and will be honored during the Graduate School's Hooding ceremony Monday, June 1, on Cannon Green. They are Janet Currie, the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs; Michael Mueller, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering; Imani Perry, professor of African American studies; and Daniel Sigman, the Dusenbury Professor of Geological and Geophysical Sciences.

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Hypersegregated cities face tough road to change

Baltimore, Maryland, and Ferguson, Missouri, share more than being the sites of racial strife over the past year. Both are part of metropolitan areas where black residents have been hypersegregated for the past four decades, according to Princeton researchers.

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Found in translation: 'Spiral Jetty' artwork born of the natural world

One day in April, Rachael DeLue, an associate professor of art and archaeology at Princeton, held class outdoors. On the north shore of the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

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Eight students receive 2015 Spirit of Princeton Award

Eight students have been named winners of the 2015 Spirit of Princeton Award, honoring Princeton University undergraduates for positive contributions to campus life. The award recognizes those who have demonstrated a strong commitment to the undergraduate experience through dedicated efforts in student organizations, athletics, community service, religious life, residential life and the arts.

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Felten joins White House as deputy chief technology officer

Edward Felten, a Princeton University computer scientist who is a leading expert on computer security, has been named U.S. deputy chief technology officer in the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). In his new role, Felten is working on policy related to technology, privacy and security.

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Seniors encouraged to make their lives 'a truly great story'

More than 130 members of the graduating senior class recently gathered in Mathey College Common Room for an evening celebrating their accomplishments and looking ahead to the new chapters of their lives after they leave Princeton.

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Video chat highlights Ebola response, lessons learned

Raphael Frankfurter, a 2013 Princeton graduate and executive director of the nonprofit group Wellbody Alliance, participated in a live video chat Thursday, May 7, to discuss the group's response to Ebola in Sierra Leone and the lessons learned from the outbreak.

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Senior thesis: Self-folding structure could slash energy use in buildings

Princeton student Denisa Buzatu's vision for an environmentally sustainable building is a sort of shape-shifting origami façade. For her senior thesis, Buzatu, a civil and environmental engineering major, is designing and prototyping a structure that shades the façade of a building by folding and adapting its shape in response to sunlight.

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A deadly shadow: Measles may weaken immune system up to three years

The measles virus can cause serious disease in children by temporarily suppressing their immune systems. This vulnerability was previously thought to last a month or two; however, a new study shows that children may in fact live in the immunological shadow of measles for up to three years, leaving them highly susceptible to a host of other deadly diseases.

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Senior thesis: Persistence yields insights into untested sexual assault kits

Princeton student Rebecca Basaldua's senior thesis relies on academic knowledge, research skill — and a generous helping of tenacity.

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Princeton Prize honors 27 high school students for promoting understanding, respect

Twenty-seven high school students from around the United States have been named recipients of the 2015 Princeton Prize in Race Relations. The students were honored April 24-25 during the annual Princeton Prize Symposium on Race held on the Princeton University campus.

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Johnson and Shaw receive Behrman Award for the humanities

Princeton professors Claudia Johnson and Brent Shaw have received the University's Howard T. Behrman Award for Distinguished Achievement in the Humanities.

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Gift establishes Kahneman and Treisman Center for Behavioral Science and Public Policy at Princeton

A $10 million gift will create the Daniel Kahneman and Anne Treisman Center for Behavioral Science and Public Policy at Princeton, enabling the University to strengthen its leading role in this emerging field and improve the development of effective policymaking.

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Class snapshot: 'Environmental Challenges and Urban Solutions'

This spring, 12 Princeton undergraduates are joining forces in the interdisciplinary course "Environmental Challenges and Urban Solutions" to confront urbanization and environmental problems and to rethink traditional theories about nature and city dynamics. 

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Identifying species imperiled by the wildlife trade may require a trip to the market

Princeton University-led research provides a new weapon in the struggle against the devastating wildlife trade: the very markets where animals are bought and sold. The researchers found that species that are disappearing as a result of the pet trade can be identified by changes in their market prices and trade volumes — increasing prices and decreasing availability could mean that wild populations are plummeting. Regular pet-market monitoring could help indicate when a particular species is in trouble so that measures could be taken to monitor and protect its wild population.

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Welcome website for Class of 2019 available

Incoming freshmen and their families can find important information about attending Princeton, as well as interact with University staff and students, via the welcome website Your Path to Princeton.

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Robertson awarded scholarship for postgraduate study at Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

Princeton senior Jake Robertson has been awarded a St. Andrew's Society Scholarship for postgraduate study at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. He will pursue a master's in classical and contemporary text (acting).

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Scheide donates rare books library to Princeton; collection is largest gift in University's history

Musician, musicologist, bibliophile and philanthropist William H. Scheide, a 1936 Princeton University alumnus who died in November at age 100, has left his extraordinary collection of some 2,500 rare printed books and manuscripts to Princeton University. With an expected appraised value of nearly $300 million, it is the largest gift in the University's history.

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FACULTY AWARD: Storey receives Mortimer Spiegelman Award for health statisticians under 40

John Storey, the William R. Harman '63 and Mary-Love Harman Professor in Genomics and professor of molecular biology and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics, has been awarded the 2015 Mortimer Spiegelman Award by the American Public Health Association (APHA). The award was created in 1970 to honor a statistician 40 years or younger who has made outstanding contributions to health statistics, especially public health statistics. The award's intent is to encourage talented young statisticians to become involved in public health. Storey, who also is director of Princeton's Center for Statistics and Machine Learning, will receive the award at the 2015 APHA annual meeting in November.

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FACULTY HONOR: Three elected to American Philosophical Society

Three Princeton faculty members have been elected to the American Philosophical Society. They were among 34 humanists, scientists, social scientists and leaders in civic and cultural affairs selected this year for their extraordinary intellectual accomplishments and leadership.

Among those elected this spring are the following Princeton faculty members: John Fleming, the Louis W. Fairchild '24 Professor of English and Comparative Literature, Emeritus; Martin Kern, the Greg '('84) and Joanna (P13) Zeluck Professor in Asian Studies; and Thomas Shenk, the James A. Elkins Jr. Professor in the Life Sciences.  

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RESEARCH AWARD: Delgado-Aparicio wins Office of Science Early Career Research Program award

Physicist Luis Delgado-Aparicio of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, has won a highly competitive Early Career Research award sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. The five-year grant of $2.6 million will fund Delgado-Aparicio's research aimed at eliminating a key barrier to developing fusion power as a safe, clean and abundant source of electric energy.

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FACULTY AWARD: Hinderer to receive Golden Goethe Medal

Walter Hinderer, professor of German emeritus, will receive the Golden Goethe Medal at a ceremony on May 28 at the National Theater of Weimar in Germany. The medal is the highest award of the Goethe Society, which was established in 1885. Hinderer has published widely on German literature, literary criticism and theory, and rhetoric and political literature from the 18th century to the present.

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FACULTY HONOR: Pringle named ESA Early Career Fellow for contributions to ecology

Robert Pringle, an assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, was named one of nine Early Career Fellows nationwide by the Ecological Society of America (ESA). Fellows are elected by ESA members, and the five-year fellowships recognize early-career researchers for their contributions and potential contributions to ecology.

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Eisgruber: Princeton saddened over reported deaths of John Nash and wife

The University community is "stunned and saddened" upon hearing news reports that Princeton mathematician John Nash and his wife, Alicia, were killed in a traffic accident, President Christopher L. Eisgruber said Sunday.

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