News at Princeton

Thursday, April 17, 2014
 Navy ROTC index

Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber (right) and Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus talk after signing the crosstown agreement among Princeton, the Navy and Rutgers University formally reinstating the Naval Reserve Officer Training Program at Princeton during a ceremony at Chancellor Green on April 15.

 

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Ceremony heralds return of NROTC program to Princeton

Flanked by midshipmen and prompted by the tune of a boatswain's pipe, Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber, United States Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, and President of Rutgers University Robert Barchi processed one-by-one into Chancellor Green on the Princeton campus. They gathered April 15 for a signing ceremony to formally reinstate the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) program at Princeton in partnership with Rutgers. 

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Six new faculty members appointed

The Princeton University Board of Trustees has approved the appointments of one full professor and five assistant professors.

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Marcoux honored to lead Princeton University athletics

At a media conference following her appointment as Princeton University's Ford Family Director of Athletics, legendary Princeton student-athlete Mollie Marcoux said she is thrilled to return to the University that played a transformative role in her life as a scholar, athlete and leader.

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Marcoux named Princeton's director of athletics

Mollie Marcoux, a legendary student-athlete at Princeton University who has played an integral role in the creation and management of the sports complexes of Chelsea Piers in New York City and Connecticut, has been appointed the University's Ford Family Director of Athletics, effective Aug. 4. She will succeed Gary Walters, who announced last fall that he would be stepping down after leading the athletics program at Princeton for 20 years. 

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Three Princeton student groups win Davis Projects for Peace

Three groups of Princeton University students each have been awarded $10,000 to travel this summer to Jordan, the Philippines and India, respectively, to implement their ideas for promoting peace through grants from the Davis Projects for Peace. The program awarded grants to students from universities across the country to pursue international endeavors during summer 2014.

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Experts urge balance between big data and privacy in health care

Big data technologies benefit researchers and consumers in the health care system, but privacy concerns must be carefully weighed, concluded speakers at the "Big Data and Health: Implications for New Jersey's Health Care System" conference held April 4 in Robertson Hall on the Princeton University campus.

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Looking to future, educators and policymakers see universities as agents for change

Concluding a three-day conference in Paris, education leaders and policymakers from around the world on Friday shared a vision of the future in which universities anticipate, influence and drive change in global society. 

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Princeton junior Stoner wins Beinecke Scholarship for graduate study in classics

Princeton junior Mary [Rosalie] Stoner has been awarded a Beinecke Scholarship, which supports promising students in their graduate studies in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

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'MOOC World': Experts clash over differing visions of education technology

University leaders and government officials from five continents on Thursday explored challenges and opportunities from economics to diversity that higher education faces. The second day of the Princeton-Fung Global Forum in Paris also featured vigorous debate on whether online learning platforms pose more risks or rewards for academia and society.

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NEWS BRIEF: Gellman plays big role in Washington Post Pulitzer; Bass a finalist

Washington Post reporter Barton Gellman, a visiting professional specialist at the Woodrow Wilson School and a visiting lecturer in public and international affairs, was the lead reporter on a series of stories about the National Security Agency's global surveillance programs that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for public service Monday. Gellman has played a key role in projects awarded two previous Pulitzer Prizes.

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Senior thesis: Sex reassignment surgery and infertility in Iranian society

Senior Miranda Kalvaria's thesis examines the impact of sex reassignment surgery and assisted reproductive technologies on various social groups in Iran. She argues that transsexuality and infertility have been medicalized — defined and treated as medical conditions in Iran. Kalvaria is a concentrator in Near Eastern studies.

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Princeton and PPPL share in $25 million nuclear arms-control project

The National Nuclear Security Administration has named Princeton University and the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as participants in a new $25 million, five-year project to address technology and policy issues related to nuclear arms control.

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Fifteen Princeton sophomores win Dale Summer Awards

Fifteen sophomores are winners of this year's Martin A. Dale '53 Summer Awards, which provide a $5,000 stipend to pursue a summer project not connected to students' academic coursework.

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Stressful environments genetically affect African American boys

Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on the genes of children as young as age 9, according to a study led by Princeton University and Pennsylvania State University researchers. Such chronic stress during youth leads to physiological weathering similar to aging.

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General Counsel McDonough to step down after 23 years at Princeton

Peter McDonough, a member of Princeton University's legal staff since 1990 and its general counsel since 2002, has announced his intention to step down from this position at the end of this academic year. He will then have a sabbatical year during which he will be available as needed to assist in the transition to his successor. 

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Princeton Preview welcomes admitted students, families

More than 2,000 people are expected to visit campus this month for Princeton Preview, as newly admitted students to the Class of 2018 and their families arrive to sample the University's academic, residential and social offerings. The annual hosting program will be held Thursday, April 10, and Monday, April 28.

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Eisgruber chooses 'Meaning in Life and Why It Matters' for Pre-read

President Christopher L. Eisgruber will ask incoming freshmen to read "Meaning in Life and Why It Matters" by Susan Wolf for the second year of the Princeton Pre-read, an introduction to the intellectual life of the University that centers on a book read by members of the freshman class and others in the Princeton community.

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HackPrinceton draws 500 students to brainstorm and build, but not sleep

For 36 hours ending Sunday afternoon, March 30, Jadwin Gym on the Princeton University campus was packed with some 500 undergraduates from more than 40 universities, working furiously on programming and hardware projects.

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Perseverance and support keys to women's success in STEM

Women from across Princeton University's science and engineering departments gathered to discuss — and find solutions to — the challenges that female scientists face during the March 29 Women in STEM symposium in Princeton's Icahn Laboratory Atrium. The event included a keynote address by Emily Carter, Princeton's Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, as well as a panel discussion with women in various stages of their scientific careers, from undergraduate students to administrators.

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Makela-Goodman named director of gift planning

Rochelle Makela-Goodman, a fundraising professional with 19 years of development experience, has joined the Princeton University Office of Development as director of gift planning.

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Pace Center service trip brings light to Peruvian village

With only the contents of a small plastic suitcase, seven Princeton University students were able to bring light to — and improve lives in — a remote village in Peru during their spring break March 15-22. The students traveled to Corpani Peñas, near the historical Machu Picchu site, as part of the Pace Center for Civic Engagement's first international service trip. The project "Solar Sustainable Service" brought reliable, low-cost energy to the isolated community of 16 homes via a solar suitcase developed by the nonprofit organization We Share Solar.

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Fung Global Fellows to focus on global diffusion

Six exceptional early-career scholars from around the world will come to Princeton University in the fall to begin a year of research, writing and collaboration as the second class of Fung Global Fellows.

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'Script to Screen': Students gain insights into Hollywood careers

Whether it's television, film, theater or video games, alumni and industry professionals in the entertainment field had one overarching piece of advice for Princeton University students during a recent campus workshop: there is no set path to a successful career in Hollywood. Screenwriters, producers, studio executives and others shared their experiences breaking into the business during the event "Careers in Hollywood: Script to Screen and Everything in Between," held March 29 in Frist Campus Center.

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Renew Theaters will operate Princeton Garden Theatre

Renew Theaters, a nonprofit organization with 21 years of experience running community movie theaters, has been selected to operate the historic Princeton Garden Theatre on Nassau Street. The lease agreement between Renew Theaters and Princeton University, which owns the property, will take effect June 1.

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Guenther: Perspective on history of medicine

Katja Guenther trained as an M.D. in Germany before she earned a Ph.D. in the history of science from Harvard University. She also holds an M.Sc. in neuroscience from the University of Oxford. Guenther joined Princeton as an assistant professor of history in 2009.

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Landsman and Malech named Fellows in the Creative and Performing Arts

Performance artist Aaron Landsman and poet Dora Malech will come to Princeton University in the fall to begin two years of teaching and collaboration as Fellows in the Creative and Performing Arts.

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Princeton employees honored for dedication and service

Five Princeton University staff members were recognized for their commitment to excellence and exceptional performance during the University's annual Service Recognition Luncheon on March 27 in Jadwin Gymnasium. In addition, two staff members were honored for their leadership potential.

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Princeton offers admission to 7.28 percent of applicants

Princeton University has offered admission to 1,939 students, or 7.28 percent of the near-record 26,641 applicants for the Class of 2018 in what is expected to be the most selective admission process in the University's history. This compares with Princeton's admission rate of a record-low 7.29 percent last year. 

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Four in 10 infants lack strong parental attachments

In a study of 14,000 U.S. children, 40 percent lack strong emotional bonds — what psychologists call "secure attachment" — with their parents that are crucial to success later in life, according to a new report. The researchers found that these children are more likely to face educational and behavioral problems.  

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Ask, write, edit: Princeton students discover journalistic paths

The Ferris McGraw Robbins Professors in Journalism have been teaching seminars at Princeton University since 1964. The program brings prominent journalists to campus for a semester. Students from a variety of disciplines, in addition to those interested in a career in journalism, are admitted by application only. "The seminars are designed to make all students more informed consumers of news and more articulate writers in expressing their views," said Kathleen Crown, executive director of the Council of the Humanities, which oversees the program.

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Sinai receives Abel Prize for lifelong influence on mathematics

Yakov Sinai, a Princeton University professor of mathematics, was awarded the 2014 Abel Prize by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters for his influential 50-year career in mathematics. The award is one of the most prestigious in the field of mathematics and includes a $1 million prize.

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Princeton senior receives Rangel Fellowship in international affairs

Princeton University senior Brittany Hardy has been awarded a Rangel Fellowship to pursue a master's degree focused on international affairs as preparation for a career in the U.S. Foreign Service. 

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Levin receives Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement

Simon Levin, the George M. Moffett Professor of Biology at Princeton University, has been awarded the 2014 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement for bridging ecological research and environmental policy, economics and social science.

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Two Princeton students named Goldwater Scholars

Two Princeton students have been awarded Goldwater Scholarships, the premier award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering. The 2013-14 winners are juniors Krysta Dummit, a chemistry major, and Daniel Mossing, a physics major. Dummit is from Shelburne, Vt., and Mossing is from Oxford, Miss.

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PPPL allows high school students to experiment with plasma online

Students at West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South in West Windsor, N.J., recently watched and controlled a glowing pink plasma on a screen in their classroom through a live video stream of an experiment five miles away at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The March 12 event marked the first demonstration of an invention that fills a gap in online education by providing students and instructors anywhere in the world with a way to take part in a laboratory experiment.

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Dust in the wind drove iron fertilization during ice age

Researchers from Princeton University and ETH Zurich have confirmed that during the last ice age iron fertilization caused plankton to thrive in a region of the Southern Ocean.

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What singing fruit flies can tell us about quick decisions

Princeton University researchers have discovered that the pitch and tempo of the male fruit fly's mating song is based on environmental cues rather than a stereotyped pattern. These findings could be substantial for understanding rapid decision-making in more advanced beings such as humans.

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Internet founders say flexible framework was key to explosive growth

Speaking before an overflow crowd in Princeton University's Friend Center auditorium, Internet pioneers Robert Kahn and Vinton Cerf said that flexibility, both social and technical, has been central to the growth and resilience of the Internet. 

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FACULTY HONOR: Tilghman elected honorary member of IEEE

Shirley M. Tilghman, president emerita of Princeton University and a professor of molecular biology, has been elected an honorary member of IEEE for her "leadership in bridging quantitative biology and engineering and for advancing higher education." Tilghman will be recognized at the 2014 IEEE Honors Ceremony in Amsterdam on Aug. 23.

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FACULTY AWARD: Three faculty win ACLS fellowships for humanistic research

Three members of the Princeton faculty have been awarded fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, which funds humanistic research. They are Devin Fore, associate professor of German; Robert Kaster, professor of classics; and Judith Weisenfeld, professor of religion.

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FACULTY HONOR: Botstein named AACR distinguished lecturer, fellow in recognition of cancer research

The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) has awarded Princeton University's David Botstein, the Anthony B. Evnin '62 Professor of Genomics, the AACR-Irving Weinstein Foundation Distinguished Lectureship in recognition of his accomplishments in and influence on cancer research. Botstein also was recently elected to the 2014 class of AACR Academy fellows, which is open only to scientists whose work has had a major impact on the field of cancer research.

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FACULTY HONOR: Seyedsayamdost named Searle Scholar

Mohammad Seyedsayamdost, an assistant professor of chemistry, has been named a 2014 Searle Scholar for his innovative research and potential for making significant contributions to chemical and biological research. Seyedsayamdost and 14 others from universities and research institutes in the United States were selected scholars, each of whom will receive $300,000 to support research programs over the next three years.

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FACULTY HONOR: Bass recognized for 'The Blood Telegram'

Gary J. Bass, a professor of politics and international affairs, is the winner of the 2014 Lionel Gelber Prize for his most recent book, "The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger, and a Forgotten Genocide." The Lionel Gelber Prize honors the world's best nonfiction book on foreign affairs. The prize is presented annually by the Lionel Gelber Foundation in partnership with Foreign Policy magazine and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. Bass will accept the award April 24 at the University of Toronto.

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FACULTY AWARD: Landweber receives Human Frontier Science Program grant

Laura Landweber, a Princeton University professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, is a co-recipient of one of only 24 Program Grants awarded worldwide by the Human Frontier Science Program, an international organization that supports new research in complex biological systems.

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FACULTY HONOR: Muldoon awarded Freedom of the City of London

Paul Muldoon, the Howard G.B. Clark '21 University Professor in the Humanities, professor of creative writing in the Lewis Center for the Arts, and chair of the Fund for Irish Studies, has been awarded the Freedom of the City of London in recognition of his outstanding contribution to poetry. He was nominated by The Honourable Irish Society, which commissioned Muldoon to write a cantata to celebrate the 400th anniversary of the society in 2013. Muldoon will receive the award, which is believed to have begun in 1237, at Guildhall, London, on March 17.

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FACULTY AWARD: Seven win Guggenheim Fellowships

Seven Princeton faculty members have received 2014 Guggenheim Fellowships: Mung Chiang, the Arthur LeGrand Doty Professor of Electrical Engineering, for "Information Engineering for Effective Learning at Massive Scale"; Andrew Cole, associate professor of English, for "The Renaissance of Late Medieval England"; Devin Fore, associate professor of German, for "All the Graphs: Soviet Factography and the Emergence of Avant-Garde Documentary"; Meghan O'Rourke, lecturer in creative writing and the Lewis Center for the Arts, for "What's Wrong with Me: The Uncertainties of Chronic Illness"; Serguei Oushakine, associate professor of anthropology and Slavic languages and literatures, for "Disowned History: Soviet Pasts in the Afterlives of Empire"; Emily Thompson, professor of history, for "Sound Effects: Technicians and the Talkies in the American Film Industry, 1925-1933"; and Claire Watkins, visiting assistant professor of creative writing and the Lewis Center for the Arts, for fiction.

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