News at Princeton

Monday, Sept. 26, 2016
 Princeton Profiles: Alex Lewis

Junior Alex Lewis sees a clear relationship between his swimming and his academics, believing he is excelling in his studies because of the sport. (Video still from Danielle Alio, Office of Communications)

 

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Princeton Profiles: Alex Lewis, using athletics to excel in academics

Princeton University junior Alex Lewis, a swimmer and computer science major, discusses his twin passions and how they relate. 

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Construction, renovation projects transform campus appearance

Most Princeton University students were away during the summer, but it was still a busy season on campus as major construction and renovation projects moved forward to expand initiatives in sustainability, arts, residential housing and other areas.

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U.S. Poet Laureate Herrera encourages students to speak out on social issues

Juan Felipe Herrera, named the first Latino United States poet laureate in 2015, spoke on Thursday evening, Sept. 22, to a standing-room only audience of students and community members at the Fields Center. The event ws presented by the Latino Graduate Student Association as part of the Latinx Heritage Month happening across campus.

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Satinsky will lead health promotion and prevention programs at Princeton

Sonya Satinsky, who has more than 12 years of experience in health promotion and higher education, has been named director of health promotion and prevention services for Princeton University Health Services (UHS). She will start Sept. 26.

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Graduate School reception focuses on diversity and inclusion

The Graduate School held a dinner reception at the Friend Center on Tuesday, Sept. 20, to welcome new and returning graduate students to the new academic year and introduce them to the diversity and inclusion staff at the Graduate School. Speakers included Dale Trevino, associate dean for diversity and inclusion in the Office of the Dean of the Graduate School; Sanjeev Kulkarni, dean of the Graduate School and a professor of electrical engineering; and Michele Minter, the vice provost for institutional equity and diversity. Attendees included faculty, staff and more than 35 graduate students from a range of academic fields.

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Part 2 — Eyewitness to history: The refugee crisis in Greece

This summer, six Princeton undergraduates embarked on Princeton's first journalism course abroad, in which students honed their on-the-ground reporting skills as they experienced firsthand the refugee crisis in Athens and on the island of Lesbos, Greece in the Ferris McGraw Seminar in Journalism "Reporting on the Front Lines of History — in Greece." This feature is Part 2 of a two-part series, "A Tale of Two Countries," focusing on new study abroad courses Princeton offered this summer. Part 1 introduces Princeton's first PIIRS (Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies) Global Seminar in France, in which students immersed themselves in the rich tradition of French theater from the heart of Paris to the countryside of Avignon.  

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The Next Four Years: The environment and climate change

Issues related to the environment and climate change will demand the new president's attention soon after he or she takes office Jan. 20 and throughout the next four years. In the second part of a Q&A series on challenges that will face the new president, Princeton University researchers Rob Nixon, Michael Oppenheimer and David Wilcove examine environmental and climate-change issues.

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University gives town residents, officials update on development of 2026 Campus Plan

Representatives of Princeton University gave a status report Monday, Sept. 19, to town of Princeton residents, council members and planning committee members on the 2026 Campus Plan that is being developed.

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PPPL and Princeton demonstrate a novel physical technique that may have applicability to future nuclear disarmament agreements

A system that can compare physical objects while potentially protecting sensitive information about the objects themselves has been demonstrated experimentally at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). This work, by researchers at Princeton University and PPPL, marks an initial confirmation of the application of a powerful cryptographic technique in the physical world.

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Part 1 — From script to stage: French theater in Paris and Avignon

Fifteen Princeton undergraduates embarked on a journey from the heart of Paris to the countryside of Avignon to immerse themselves in the rich tradition of French theater from the historical to the contemporary, and from the practical to the conceptual in the PIIRS Global Seminar "French Theater Today: Practice and Performance in Paris and at the Avignon Theater Festival." This feature is Part 1 of a two-part series, "A Tale of Two Countries," focusing on new study abroad courses Princeton offered this summer. Later this week, read about Princeton's first journalism course abroad, in which students honed their on-the-ground reporting skills as they experienced firsthand the refugee crisis in Athens and on the island of Lesbos, Greece.

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Community and Staff Day brings students and families together for fun, football and fireworks

Organized by the Office of Community and Regional Affairs, Princeton's annual Community and Staff Day on Saturday, Sept. 17, featured a Family Fun Fest at Princeton Stadium. Several local nonprofits and University departments set up booths with crafts, music, face painting, bounce houses and games throughout the stadium concourse. University student-athletes hosted a youth sports clinic — including baseball, basketball, crew, fencing, lacrosse, softball and track and field, among others — on Weaver Track next to the stadium. The fun concluded with the Princeton football team's home opener against Lafayette College, to which 12,000 area residents received free tickets. After the game — which Princeton won, 35 to 31 — fireworks lit up the sky.

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Bringing people together as scientists to save a zebra species

On Sept. 3, results were announced for the Great Grévy's Rally held in Kenya in January. The Princeton-sponsored event used 40,000 photos collected by 500 volunteers to track and identify the remaining wild population of the world's largest and most imperiled wild horse species, the Grévy's zebra. The rally revealed that 2,350 Grévy's remain, 95 percent of which live in just five counties in northern Kenya. The initiative was among the first to use "citizen scientists" to establish the population and range of an endangered mammal.

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Historian of religion Pagels awarded National Humanities Medal

Princeton University faculty member Elaine Pagels, an authority on the religions of late antiquity and the author of "The Gnostic Gospels" and "Beyond Belief: The Secret Gospel of Thomas," has been named a recipient of the 2015 National Humanities Medal. The announcement was made today by the White House. The medal will be conferred by President Barack Obama at a ceremony at the White House on Sept. 22.

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Off we go: Facts, figures and fun on the first day of classes

Wednesday, Sept. 14, marks the first day of classes for Princeton’s 2016-17 academic year. In honor of that new beginning, we’ve compiled a few fun facts and figures — beginning with a look way back and ending with a date many have circled on their calendars.

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The Next Four Years: The Economy

The next president will face a range of economic challenges from his or her first moment in office. In this Q&A, Princeton economists Alan Krueger and Cecilia Rouse explore the key economic issues ahead for the nation in the short and long term. This is the first in a series of Q&A articles with Princeton University experts leading up to the election titled “The Next Four Years.”

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Stiff and oxygen-deprived tumors promote spread of cancer

Researchers from Princeton University and the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center have found specific conditions — tumor hardness and a lack of oxygen at the tumor's core — that lead to breast-cancer progression in laboratory cultures. The research could have implications for developing more effective treatments for some forms of cancer.

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University takes steps to diversify naming of buildings and campus iconography

Princeton University has taken steps to carry out recommendations of the Trustee committee on Woodrow Wilson's legacy that are intended to bring greater diversity to the naming of campus buildings and spaces and to diversify the art and iconography on the campus.  

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Eisgruber welcomes Class of 2020: 'We're all in it together'

Stressing a theme of community, Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber welcomed the Class of 2020 to the University on Sunday, Sept. 11, during Opening Exercises marking the start of the academic year.

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Princeton students honored at Opening Exercises

Princeton University recognized the accomplishments of its students with the awarding of four undergraduate prizes at Opening Exercises on Sunday, Sept. 11.

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Immersive program exposes students to 'fascinating complexity' of startup businesses

This summer, 30 students worked at 19 early-stage startup companies in New York City as part of the Keller Center's new Princeton Start-Up Immersion Program (PSIP). Participants lived as a group and, through their daily work with startup companies, experienced the fast-paced world of entrepreneurs and emerging businesses.

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Gregory named chair of the Council of the Humanities

Eric Gregory, professor of religion, has been appointed chair of Princeton University's Council of the Humanities. He is also director of the Program in Humanistic Studies and the Stewart Seminars in Religion, serves on the Executive Committee of the University Center for Human Values and is a fellow of Whitman College, one of Princeton's six residential colleges.

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Sharing stories synchronizes group memories

People synchronize what they remember and what they forget after sharing memories with one another, according to research published by Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

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Climate change increased chances of record rains in Louisiana by at least 40 percent

Human­-caused climate warming increased the chances of the torrential rains that unleashed devastating floods in south Louisiana in mid-August by at least 40 percent, according to a team of scientists from Princeton University and partner institutions with the international research network World Weather Attribution (WWA). The research team, which conducted a rapid assessment of the role of climate on the historic heavy-rain event, also found that climate change boosted the chance of rain volume by 10 percent.

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Seeing the forest for the trees: World's largest reforestation program overlooks wildlife

Princeton University-led research found that China's reforestation program, the world's largest, overwhelmingly leads to the planting of monoculture forests that fall short of restoring the biodiversity of native forests — and can even harm existing wildlife. The researchers conclude that restoring the full complement of native trees would be best for biodiversity, with mixed forests of multiple tree species being a good second option.

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The brain performs feats of math to make sense of the world

Princeton University researchers have found that the brain is quite good at rapidly and subconsciously calculating the likelihood of various events, and remain flexible enough to account for new information. They traced these abilities to a region of the brain located just behind our eyes known as the orbitofrontal cortex.

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FACULTY NEWS BRIEF: Nordenson and Oppenheimer serve as structural engineers on new National Museum of African American History and Culture

The structural engineering for the National Museum of African American History and Culture, situated on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was done by two engineers teaching at Princeton University's School of Architecture. Professor of Architecture Guy Nordenson — of Guy Nordenson and Associates — served as structural engineer for the building's superstructure, and Visiting Lecturer in Architecture Nat Oppenheimer — of Robert Silman Associates New York — served as structural engineer for the building's substructure. The architect, David Adjaye, also taught at the School of Architecture for several years. The museum will open to the public on Saturday, Sept. 24.

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FACULTY AWARD: Five Princeton professors among inaugural HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholars

Five Princeton University faculty members have been selected as inaugural faculty scholars by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Simons Foundation and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Selected as HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholars were Clifford Brangwynne, an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering; Martin Jonikas, an assistant professor of molecular biology; and Coleen Murphy, professor of molecular biology and the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics. Mala Murthy, an associate professor of molecular biology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, and Celeste Nelson, professor of chemical and biological engineering, were named HHMI Faculty Scholars. They are among 84 early-career scientists from 43 American institutions to receive the five-year grants, which total about $83 million.

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FACULTY AWARD: Carey, Gunn receive NSF award to bring STEM to prisons

Two Princeton University faculty members have received a two-year National Science Foundation INCLUDES award to create a statewide educational pilot program called "STEPs to STEM" that would bring science education into New Jersey state prisons. Jannette Carey, an associate professor of chemistry, and James Gunn, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Astronomy, Emeritus, proposed to create a statewide STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) track within community-college programs established in state prisons through the New Jersey Scholarship and Transformative Education in Prisons Consortium (NJ-STEP).

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FACULTY HONOR: Mónica Ponce de León elected member of the National Academy

Mónica Ponce de León, dean of the School of Architecture and professor of architecture, has been selected as a member of the National Academy (formerly the Academy of Design), founded in 1825. Members are elected by their peers in recognition of their exceptional contributions to American art and architecture — representing a commitment to preserving the cultural heritage of the United States and pushing creative boundaries. The new members will be inducted in October.

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FACULTY AWARD: Torquato receives National American Chemical Society award

Salvatore Torquato, a Princeton University professor of chemistry and the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM), has received the Joel Henry Hildebrand Award in Theoretical and Experimental Chemistry of Liquids from the American Chemical Society. The award recognizes distinguished contributions to understanding the chemistry and physics of liquids.

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