News at Princeton

Thursday, April 27, 2017
 Heritage dining video Binita Gupta

Binita Gupta, Class of 2020, said she appreciates how Campus Dining serves food that reflects the variety of tastes of students who come to Princeton University from all over the country and the world. (Video still from Nick Donnoli, Office of Communications)

 

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Sharing new tastes through cultural heritage dining

Campus Dining exposes students to new cuisines and cultures, and also reflects the different tastes of students who come to Princeton University from all over the country and the world. 

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Jin Yun Chow named valedictorian, Grant Storey selected as salutatorian

Jin Yun Chow, a comparative literature major from Hong Kong, has been selected as valedictorian of Princeton's Class of 2017. Grant Storey, a computer science major from Berkeley, California, has been named the Latin salutatorian.

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Fung Global Fellows to focus on the culture and politics of resentment

Six exceptional early career scholars from around the world will come to Princeton University this fall to begin a year of research, writing and collaboration as the fifth cohort of Fung Global Fellows.

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Ten graduate students celebrated for excellence in teaching and service

The Graduate School has presented nine graduate students with its annual Teaching Awards in recognition of their outstanding abilities as teachers. An additional one-time Service in Teaching Award also was granted this year.

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Princeton supports Hawaii's legal challenge to federal immigration order

Princeton and the 30 other colleges and universities who filed a friend-of-the-court brief last month supporting a legal challenge to the Trump administration's March 6 revised executive order on immigration filed a similar brief Thursday, April 20, in another challenge to the order.

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Film director Baz Luhrmann selected as 2017 Class Day speaker

Academy Award-nominated film director, screenwriter and producer Baz Luhrmann has been selected to deliver the keynote address at the University's Class Day ceremony on Monday, June 5.

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Princeton unveils preview of new main website design

Princeton University has made public a preview version of a new design for its main website and is seeking comment from the University community and other visitors to the site. The preview site is at beta.princeton.edu.

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University opens new AccessAbility Center for students with disabilities

The opening of Princeton's AccessAbility Center on April 13 marked a significant step in the University's efforts to ensure equal access to its curricular and co-curricular opportunities for students with disabilities.

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Three Ph.D. candidates and two alumni awarded fellowships for new Americans

Princeton Ph.D. candidates Laura Chang, Bernardo Gouveia and Ashvin Swaminathan and recent alumni Mariana Olaizola and Shivani Radhakrishnan have been awarded the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans, a graduate school fellowship for outstanding immigrants and children of immigrants in the United States.

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University names West College for Toni Morrison; Wilson School auditorium for Arthur Lewis

Princeton University's trustees have approved recommendations to name West College, a prominent and central campus building, for the Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison, an emeritus faculty member at Princeton, and to name the major auditorium in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs for Sir Arthur Lewis, a Nobel Laureate in Economics, who served on the school's faculty from 1963 to 1983. The name of former University President Harold Dodds will be transferred from the auditorium to the adjacent atrium that serves as the entryway into Robertson Hall. The new names will take effect on July 1.

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Biased bots: Artificial-intelligence systems echo human prejudices

Princeton University-based researchers have found that machine-learning programs can acquire the cultural biases embedded in the patterns of wording, from a mere preference for flowers over insects, to discriminatory views on race and gender.

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Gerard Washnitzer, learned and spirited professor of mathematics, dies at 91

Gerard Washnitzer, a Princeton University professor of mathematics, emeritus, known for his work in algebraic geometry and lively personality, died April 2 in hospice in Scotch Plains, New Jersey. He was 91.

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University considers potential sites for residential college, engineering, environmental studies

Princeton University has identified a potential site for a new undergraduate residential college south of Poe Field and east of Elm Drive and potential sites for the expansion of engineering and environmental studies on lands along the north side of Ivy Lane and Western Way, west of FitzRandolph Road. 

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'At Home in the World': DiBattista and Nord reframe female literary tradition

In their new book, "At Home in the World: Women Writers and Public Life, from Austen to the Present," Princeton professors Maria DiBattista and Deborah Nord re-evaluate the past two centuries of female novelists as their characters leave the threshold of home. The scholars turn their attention to how these characters engage with the most pressing issues of public life: economic and social justice, slavery, warfare, democratic reforms, globalization and the clash of cultures. DiBattista is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and comparative literature. Nord is the Woodrow Wilson Professor of Literature and Professor of English.

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Four Princeton Nobel laureates share wisdom, parting advice to graduating seniors

Four Nobel Prize winners on the Princeton faculty shared anecdotes and stories about their careers on Thursday, April 13, in "A Conversations with Four Nobel Laureates: Reflections on Resilience Through Challenges," part of the "Last Lectures" series organized by the senior class. The laureates included: Duncan Haldane, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics (2016 Nobel laureate in physics); Christopher Sims, the John J.F. Sherrerd '52 Professor of Economics (2011 Nobel laureate in economics); Eric Wieschaus, the Squibb Professor in Molecular Biology (1995 Nobel laureate in physiology/medicine); and Angus Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of International Affairs, Emeritus, and professor of economics and international affairs, emeritus (2015 Nobel laureate in economics).

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Twice as bright: Earth-sized planets with two suns could still be habitable

Scientists know that two-star systems can support planets, but the question has remained whether an Earth-size terrestrial planet were orbiting two suns could it support life. A study in the journal Nature Communications has now found that an Earth-like planet orbiting two stars could be habitable if it were within a certain range from its two stars.

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Mathematician Pardon receives top national award for young scientists

John Pardon, a Princeton University professor of mathematics, has received a National Science Foundation Alan T. Waterman Award, which is the nation's highest honor for scientists and engineers younger than 35. The prize carries a five-year, $1 million grant. Pardon was recognized for "revolutionary, groundbreaking results in geometry and topology" that "have extended the power of tools of geometric analysis to solve deep problems in real and complex geometry, topology and dynamical systems."

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Returning from Washington, Felten seeks dialogue between technology and policy

Edward Felten, the Robert E. Kahn Professor of Computer Science and Public Affairs, recently returned to Princeton as the director of the Center for Information Technology Policy. Felten, who studies the intersection of public policy and information technology, served as a technology adviser at the Federal Trade Commission and the White House during portions of the Obama administration. Felten participated at the Princeton-Fung Global Forum in Berlin on liberty and the digital age in March. He  spoke about his experience working for the U.S. government in a recent interview. 

 

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Princeton-Fung Global Forum asks if liberty can survive the digital age

Understanding the balance between privacy and security — and how it affects liberty and democracy — was the theme of the fourth Princeton-Fung Global Forum held March 20-21 in Berlin.

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Princeton junior Rosen awarded Truman Scholarship for public service

Princeton University junior Miranda Rosen has been awarded a 2017 Truman Scholarship, which provides up to $30,000 toward graduate school and the opportunity to participate in professional development programs to prepare for careers in public service.

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Forty-six people become U.S. citizens at naturalization ceremony on campus

Forty-six people from 28 countries became citizens of the United States during a naturalization ceremony held Wednesday, April 12, at Princeton University.

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Tool for checking complex computer architectures reveals flaws in emerging design

With backing from some of the largest technology companies, a major project called RISC-V seeks to facilitate open-source design for computer chips, offering the possibility of opening chip designs beyond the few firms that dominate the space. As the project moves toward a formal release, researchers at Princeton University have discovered a series of errors in the RISC-V instruction specification that now are leading to changes in the new system.

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Andlinger Center panelists see routes to climate change progress despite political opposition

Drastic changes in climate policy under the Trump administration should not cause environmental advocates to lose hope, a panel of experts said at a recent symposium at Princeton University's Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment.

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Two seniors awarded ReachOut fellowships for public service

Princeton University seniors Destiny Crockett and Nicolas Trad have been awarded fellowships from ReachOut 56-81-06, an alumni-funded effort that supports year-long public service projects after graduation. Each senior will receive a stipend of $30,000 to pay for living expenses during their fellowship year.

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Princeton's annual financial aid budget grows 8.7 percent to $161.2 million

Princeton University's trustees have adopted the University's operating budget for 2017-18, which includes an 8.7 percent increase to $161.2 million in the undergraduate financial aid budget to continue to ensure that a Princeton education is genuinely affordable for every admitted student.

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Senior Parnagian to focus on US underserved communities through fellowship

Princeton University senior Melissa Parnagian has been awarded a Sheila C. Johnson Fellowship from Harvard Kennedy School, a full tuition scholarship for graduate students with a demonstrated interest in developing leadership skills focused on reducing disparities in underserved communities in the United States.

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Princeton employees honored for dedication and service

Six Princeton staff members were recognized for their commitment to excellence and exceptional performance during the University's annual Service Recognition Luncheon on March 28 in Jadwin Gymnasium. In addition, two staff members were honored for their leadership potential.

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Princeton announces plan to have 'bubble' over Powers Field each winter

A $3.5 million gift from an anonymous donor will now allow Powers Field to be covered by a climate-controlled seasonal air structure, or 'bubble,' that will enable the field to be used year-round. The bubble will cover the entire playing field of the facility and will have multiple uses and users.

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Four Princeton students named Goldwater Scholars for STEM study

Princeton juniors Lamia Ateshian, Sally Jiao, Jonathan Lu and Omkar Shende have been awarded one-year Goldwater Scholarships, the premier award for outstanding undergraduates interested in careers in mathematics, the natural sciences and engineering.

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Luijendijk, Rowley appointed college heads

AnneMarie Luijendijk, professor of religion, has been named head of Wilson College, and Clancy Rowley, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, has been named head of Rockefeller College. Both will begin their four-year terms as heads of two of Princeton University's six residential colleges on July 1.

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ˇAdelante Tigres! conference celebrates Princeton's Latino alumni

Recalling their Princeton experiences and looking forward to new ones, more than 750 Princeton University undergraduate and graduate alumni and guests returned to campus March 30-April 1 for the alumni conference "ˇAdelante Tigres! Celebrating Latino Alumni at Princeton University."

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President Eisgruber sends letter of support to Central European University in Hungary

Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber on Saturday sent a letter of support to the head of the Central European University, expressing concern over legislation proposed by the Hungarian government that could close the university.

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Princeton and other universities support challenge to second executive order travel ban

Princeton and 30 other colleges and universities filed a friend-of-the-court brief Friday, March 31, supporting a legal challenge to the Trump administration's March 6 revised executive order on immigration.

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Princeton offers admission to 6.1 percent of Class of 2021 applicants

Princeton University has offered admission to 1,890 students, or 6.1 percent of the record 31,056 applicants for the Class of 2021, in what is the University's most selective admission process to date. Last year, the University's admission rate was 6.46 percent. The class size is expected to be 1,308 students for the Class of 2021.

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Brain's 'GPS' does a lot more than just navigate

The part of the brain that creates mental maps of one's environment plays a much broader role in memory and learning than was previously thought, according to new research published today in the journal Nature by researchers at Princeton University.

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Vehicles, not farms, are likely source of smog-causing ammonia

Agriculture has long been blamed for smog-causing ammonia in the atmosphere, but vehicle tailpipes actually are a more important source of ammonia's contribution to the haze that hovers over big cities, according to new research by a team including Princeton engineers.

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William Graessley, emeritus chemical engineering professor and polymers expert, dies at 83

William Graessley, a Princeton professor of chemical engineering emeritus who spent his career seeking elegant solutions to problems involving long, entangled molecules known as polymers, died on Feb. 18 near Evanston, Illinois. He was 83.

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Four seniors win Labouisse Prize for international civic engagement projects

Princeton University seniors Ava Hoffman, Lara Norgaard, Vidushi Sharma and Achille Tenkiang have been awarded the Henry Richardson Labouisse '26 Prize to pursue international civic engagement projects for one year following graduation.

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From elegy to lyric, poet Stewart explores nature, love and memory in 'Cinder'

Susan Stewart is the Avalon Foundation University Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English. Her newest book, "Cinder" (Graywolf Press, 2017) is her first retrospective of new and selected poems.

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Senior Wenger awarded Keasbey Scholarship for study in Britain

Senior Ayelet Wenger has been awarded the Keasbey Scholarship, which provides the opportunity to study at selected British universities. Wenger, of Columbus, Ohio, is a classics major who is also pursuing certificates in Judaic studies and Hellenic studies. She will pursue an M.Phil. in Judaism and Christianity in the Graeco-Roman World at the University of Oxford.

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University to administer third 'We Speak' sexual misconduct awareness survey

Completing a three-year effort, Princeton University will again survey undergraduate and graduate students about their knowledge and experiences of inappropriate sexual behavior and about their awareness of University policies, procedures and resources.

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FACULTY HONOR: Seven named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Seven Princeton faculty members have been named fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. They are among 228 leaders in scholarship, business, the arts and public affairs elected this year in recognition of their contributions to their respective fields.  

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FACULTY AWARD: Eight win Guggenheim Fellowships

Eight Princeton faculty members have received 2017 Guggenheim Fellowships — they are among 173 fellowships from a group of almost 3,000 applicants awarded on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise. The recipients are: Mark Beissinger, the Henry W. Putnam Professor of Politics, for a project that concerns how revolution as a mode of regime-change has evolved globally over the past century; B. Andrei Bernevig, professor of physics, who focuses on quantum condensed matter physics; Linda Colley, the Shelby M.C. Davis 1958 Professor of History, for a forthcoming book on how rising levels of conflict after 1750 fostered the worldwide spread of new constitutions; Phil Klay, lecturer in creative writing and the Lewis Center for the Arts, for fiction; Aaron Landsman, visiting associate professor and Belknap Visiting Fellow in the Council of the Humanities, for drama and performance art; Fiona Maazel, lecturer in creative writing and the Lewis Center for the Arts, for fiction; Claudia Rankine, visiting professor of creative writing and the Lewis Center for the Arts, for poetry; and Stacy Wolf, professor of theater in the Lewis Center for the Arts, for her forthcoming book, "Beyond Broadway: Four Seasons of Amateur Musical Theatre in the U.S."

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RESEARCH HONOR: Coverdale receives ESA Graduate Student Policy Award

Tyler Coverdale, a graduate student in Princeton University's Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, was one of six graduate students nationwide to receive a Graduate Student Policy Award from The Ecological Society of America. Recipients will travel to Washington, D.C., to meet with policymakers and discuss the importance of federal funding for the biological and ecological sciences.

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