News at Princeton

Saturday, Nov. 22, 2014
 Kagan

Elena Kagan, an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of Princeton's Class of 1981, engages in a discussion with President Christopher L. Eisgruber, a renowned constitutional scholar, before answering questions from students and other members of the audience during an event Thursday, Nov. 20, in Richardson Auditorium.

 

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Kagan discusses the Constitution, the Supreme Court and her time at Princeton

In a conversation peppered with humor and warmth, Elena Kagan, an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court and a member of Princeton's Class of 1981, offered insights into her time at the University, the workings of the court and her legal philosophy on Thursday, Nov. 20, at Richardson Auditorium.

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Industry, academic collaborators push for energy solutions

Investigating long-term solutions to the world's energy needs and investing in sustainable technologies are crucial as the climate crisis comes into focus, a set of experts cautioned at Princeton University on Friday, Nov. 14. 

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Holiday outreach service initiatives planned

Members of the University community will have the opportunity to share the holiday spirit through a series of community service initiatives and special events planned for December and January.

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Board approves five appointments to Princeton faculty

The Princeton University Board of Trustees has approved the appointments of five faculty members, including one full professor, one associate professor and three assistant professors.

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Unique sense of 'touch' gives a prolific bacterium its ability to infect anything

A study led by Princeton University researchers found that one of the world's most prolific bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, manages to afflict humans, animals and even plants by way of a mechanism not before seen in any infectious microorganism — a sense of touch.

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Head coaching position for men's squash named for alumnus Bob Callahan

The head coaching position for Princeton's men's squash team will be named for Class of 1977 alumnus Bob Callahan, who was inducted into the U.S. Squash Hall of Fame in 2012 for his contributions to the game as a Princeton player and as the Universi...

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Alumnus William Scheide leaves 'lasting legacy' to Princeton

William Scheide, a member of the Class of 1936, musician, bibliophile and philanthropist committed to furthering the depth and breadth of the arts and humanities at Princeton University, died of natural causes at his home in Princeton, New Jersey, on Nov. 14. He was 100.

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Queen Noor, Eakes to receive top alumni awards

Princeton University will present its top honors for alumni to Her Majesty Queen Noor of Jordan, an advocate for humanitarian issues around the world, and Martin Eakes, a community organizer and economic strategist. The honorees speak to two priority areas of the University: internationalism and service.

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Bringing ancient Buddhism to light

The Mogao Caves in the desert of northwest China tell a story of art and Buddhism that began more than 1,500 years ago. Today, Princeton scholars are playing a key role as part of an international effort to understand this story, which unfolds at the heart of the ancient trade route known as the Silk Road.

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Princeton celebrates faculty inventions at annual event

A method for discovering antibiotics, a device for studying developing lungs and a fuel-efficient engine design were three of the innovations displayed at Celebrate Princeton Invention. The annual event, held Thursday, Nov. 13, honors Princeton faculty, staff and students whose research has the potential to improve lives and benefit society.

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Former Princeton trustee and civil rights lawyer John Doar dies at 92

John Doar, a 1944 Princeton graduate and nationally prominent civil rights attorney who as a University trustee from 1969 to 1979, played an instrumental role in the University's response to the Vietnam War, died of congestive heart failure at his home in New York City on Nov. 11. He was 92.

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Q&A: What's next for the Affordable Care Act?

The next open enrollment period for the Affordable Care Act begins Nov. 15. What can we expect to happen over the next year? And how many more uninsured Americans will gain access to care? Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs discussed the law with Heather Howard, director of the State Health Reform Assistance Network and a lecturer in public affairs at the Wilson School.  

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Students engage in public service during fall 'breakouts'

As part of the seven Breakout trips over fall break, 13 undergraduates participated in the trip "Hipsters and High-rises: The Socioeconomic Effects of Gentrification in New York City," to take a close look at the intersections of art, urban design, gentrification and community preservation in New York.

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Joyce Carol Oates 'Fest' celebrates her 'life-changing' influence on student writers

In a lively twist on the academic tradition of festschrift — a collection of writings published in honor of a scholar — colleagues and former students celebrated Joyce Carol Oates with stories and remembrances in Chancellor Green Rotunda on Friday, Nov. 7, before an audience of about 300 Princeton students, faculty and staff, and community members. Oates, the Roger S. Berlind '52 Professor of the Humanities who has taught in the Lewis Center for the Arts' Program in Creative Writing for 36 years, will retire from full-time teaching at the end of the academic year. She will continue to teach a course at Princeton each fall.  

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Research on site: The Princeton campus as living lab

Princeton researchers are embarking on sustainability research projects this fall using the campus as a living laboratory. The projects will enable faculty members and students to explore issues in energy-efficiency, watershed management and environmental monitoring in a real-life setting.

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Princeton launches website for strategic planning initiative

Princeton University has created a website that will serve as a source of information about the University's strategic planning process that President Christopher L. Eisgruber announced earlier this year. The website, www.princeton.edu/strategicplan, explains the strategic planning effort, identifies the task forces studying a wide range of issues and will serve as a central location for the campus community to access task force reports and other documents.

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Does life satisfaction increase with age? Only in some places, new study finds

Life satisfaction dips around middle age and rises in older age in high-income, English-speaking countries, but that is not a universal pattern, according to a new report published in The Lancet as part of a special series on aging. In contrast, residents of other regions — such as the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa — grow increasingly less satisfied as they age, said the researchers from Princeton and other institutions.

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OCR concludes investigation; new agreement brings Princeton into Title IX compliance

The U. S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR) has concluded its investigation of Title IX complaints against Princeton University that were filed in 2010 and 2011, and has released a resolution agreement which, according to OCR, "addresses the compliance concerns identified in OCR's investigation and, when fully implemented, will resolve the University’s non-compliance" with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 as it applies to sexual harassment and violence.  

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Q&A: Casting light on the Internet's shadows (and shadowing)

The specter of a faceless system collecting data from Web users and compiling personal profiles has raised alarms among privacy advocates worldwide. Arvind Narayanan, an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton University, founded the Web Transparency and Accountability Project (WebTAP) at the Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) to address difficult questions related to Internet privacy.

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Tracking the trackers: Investigators reveal pervasive profiling of Web users

Revealing and measuring the many commercial tools that invisibly track Web users is a key step toward improving transparency and privacy on the Internet, according to a set of privacy and technology experts who convened at Princeton University on Oct. 24.

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Eisgruber discusses open communication, respectful growth with Princeton Council

During an informal public discussion with Princeton town officials Monday, Nov. 3, Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber emphasized issues of mutual concern and ways "a great university and a great community" can flourish together.

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New Dinky station to open Nov. 17, marking Arts and Transit Project milestone

Princeton University's Arts and Transit Project will reach a major milestone when the new Princeton Station opens Nov. 17, marking the final stages of the transit portion of the project.

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Members appointed to new advisory committee on sexual misconduct

Princeton University faculty, staff and students have been appointed to the new Faculty-Student Committee on Sexual Misconduct and the group expects to hold its first meeting sometime in November. The committee serves as an advisory group regarding Princeton's work to prevent sexual misconduct, assure effective implementation of sexual misconduct policies and support students in compliance with the University's obligations under federal Title IX requirements.

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Online learners join Princeton students in 'Global History Lab'

Watch this video for an introduction to the "Global History Lab," an online course that allows participants from around the world to join Princeton undergraduates on a journey through world history.

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Compassion, service, joy: The Dalai Lama visits Princeton

With wisdom, honesty and humor, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama urged young people to take action to make the world more peaceful through compassion and service during a visit to Princeton University on Tuesday, Oct. 28.

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Wage disclosures for public officials lead to salary cuts, high turnover rates

In the era of big data, transparency has become a popular policy tool for addressing potential problems. But publicly disclosing personal information — such as government officials' income — may result in unintended consequences.  

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Turning loss to gain: cutting power could dramatically boost laser output

Lasers — devices that deliver beams of highly organized light — are so deeply integrated into modern technology that their basic operations would seem well understood. CD players, medical diagnostics and military surveillance all depend on lasers. Re-examining longstanding beliefs about the physics of these devices, Princeton engineers have now shown that carefully restricting the delivery of power to certain areas within a laser could boost its output by many orders of magnitude.

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What makes a tumor switch from dormant to malignant?

Cancer constantly wages war on the human body. Battles are won, lost or sometimes end in a stalemate. This stalemate, known as tumor dormancy, is extremely difficult to study in both cellular and animal models. A new computational model developed in the laboratory of Salvatore Torquato, a professor of chemistry at Princeton University, offers a way to probe the conditions surrounding tumor dormancy and the switch to a malignant state.

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Princeton launches new initiatives to increase socioeconomic diversity

Princeton has launched two new initiatives that aim to further increase the socioeconomic diversity of its student body and the range of students at Princeton who major in fields related to science and technology. The two initiatives fulfill commitments that were made this past January by President Christopher L. Eisgruber when he participated in a White House summit that sought to increase college opportunities for low-income and disadvantaged students nationwide. The University also has expanded its efforts to identify and recruit students from low-income and disadvantaged backgrounds.

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Princeton celebrates international partnership with 'University of Tokyo Day'

The presidents and other top officials from the University of Tokyo and Princeton University celebrated and deepened their research and teaching partnership in discussions on the Princeton campus Thursday, Oct. 23.

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Two years after Hurricane Sandy, recognition of Princeton's microgrid still surges

In the nearly two years since Hurricane Sandy hit New Jersey, attention has fallen on Princeton University's "microgrid," an efficient on-campus power generation and delivery network that remained active while surrounding areas lost power for days, as a national example of how to keep power running for residents, emergency workers and crucial facilities when the next disaster strikes.

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'Coming Back' conference brings together University's black alumni

The "Coming Back: Reconnecting Princeton's Black Alumni" conference, held Oct. 16-18, offered Princeton University's black alumni the opportunity to return to campus to participate in intellectual and social offerings. More than 750 undergraduate and graduate alumni and guests attended the conference — representing classes from 1962 to 2014, coming from more than 30 states and at least six other nations.

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FACULTY AWARD: Bass receives Cundill Prize for 'Blood Telegram'

Gary Bass, a professor of politics and international affairs, is the winner of the Cundill Prize in Historical Literature for his book, "The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger, and a Forgotten Genocide." The Cundill Prize is given annually to an individual who has published a book "determined to have a profound literary, social and academic impact in the area of history." Bass was awarded the prize at a Nov. 19 ceremony in Toronto.

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FACULTY AWARD: Princeton researchers among Foreign Policy's 2014 Leading Global Thinkers

Three Princeton University researchers, two current and one past, were recognized as among Foreign Policy magazine's 100 Leading Global Thinkers of 2014 for their novel approach to verifying the existence of nuclear warheads: Alexander Glaser, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and international affairs, Robert Goldston, a professor of astrophysical sciences in the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and Boaz Barak, an assistant professor of computer science now a senior researcher at Microsoft Research New England.

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FACULTY AWARD: Reinhardt receives New York Academy of Medicine Medal

Uwe Reinhardt, the James Madison Professor of Political Economy and professor of economics and public affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, was awarded a 2014 New York Academy of Medicine Medal for distinguished contributions by individuals in health policy, public health, clinical practice and biomedical research. Reinhardt was recognized for his important contributions to the public's understanding of health care financing and the implications of policy decisions about health care reform, which have both shaped these reforms and contributed to the health of the public.

Reinhardt received his award on Thursday, Nov. 6, in New York City.  

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FACULTY AWARD: Manabe named 2015 Franklin Institute Laureate

Syukuro Manabe, a senior meteorologist in Princeton University's Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, received the 2015 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Earth and Environmental Science from Philadelphia's Franklin Institute for his work developing accurate climate models.

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FACULTY HONOR: Bass wins Bernard Schwartz Book Award

Gary Bass, a professor of politics and international affairs, has been named the winner of the 2014 Bernard Schwartz Book Award for his book, "The Blood Telegram: Nixon, Kissinger, and a Forgotten Genocide." The Bernard Schwartz Book Award, presented by the Asia Society Policy Institute, recognizes nonfiction books for their outstanding contributions to the understanding of contemporary Asia or U.S.-Asia relations. Bass will be presented with a prize and honored at a special event to be held at the Asia Society's headquarters in New York City later this year. 

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FACULTY HONOR: Glaude elected vice president of American Academy of Religion

Eddie Glaude Jr., the William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies and chair of the Center for African American Studies, has been elected as vice president of the American Academy of Religion.

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FACULTY AWARD: Sundaresan receives Humboldt Research Award for lifetime achievement

Sankaran Sundaresan, a Princeton University professor of chemical and biological engineering, has been chosen to receive a Humboldt Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, in recognition of lifetime achievements in research. The award is presented to up to 100 non-German scientists each year who are nominated by their peers in Germany. Sundaresan, whose work involves transport phenomena and process engineering, is invited to spend up to a year cooperating on a long-term research research project with colleagues at an institution in Germany.

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FACULTY HONOR: Six Princeton professors inducted to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Six Princeton University professors were among 164 influential artists, scientists, scholars, authors and institutional leaders inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Oct. 11. The inductees from Princeton are: Neta Bahcall, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Astronomy and professor of astrophysical sciences; Charles Cameron, professor of politics and public affairs; Janet Currie, the Henry Putnam Professor of Economics and Public Affairs and chair of economics; David Gabai, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of Mathematics and department chair; Susan Naquin, professor of history and East Asian studies, emeritus; and Robert Socolow, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, emeritus. Founded in 1780, the academy is one of the nation's oldest and most prestigious learned societies.

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University contributions to Princeton town

Summary of the many ways in which Princeton University currently contributes to and engages with the Princeton community. Submitted in a memo by President Christopher L. Eisgruber to the Princeton mayor and council on Oct. 28, 2014.

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