News at Princeton

Thursday, Oct. 23, 2014
ComingBack_index

The "Coming Back: Reconnecting Princeton's Black Alumni" conference, held Oct. 16-18, offered Princeton University's black alumni the opportunity to return to campus to participate in intellectual and social offerings. More than 750 undergraduate and graduate alumni and guests attended the conference — representing classes from 1962 to 2014, coming from more than 30 states and at least six other nations. Above, alumni learn about new developments on campus — from construction to diversity initiatives — during a conversation in Richardson Auditorium with President Christopher L. Eisgruber.

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'Coming Back' conference brings together University's black alumni

The "Coming Back: Reconnecting Princeton's Black Alumni" conference, held Oct. 16-18, offered Princeton University's black alumni the opportunity to return to campus to participate in intellectual and social offerings. More than 750 undergraduate and graduate alumni and guests attended the conference — representing classes from 1962 to 2014, coming from more than 30 states and at least six other nations.

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TigerHub is new course planning, academic information site

Princeton University will launch a new online student portal, TigerHub, where undergraduate and graduate students plan and enroll in courses, access academic records and maintain personal information. TigerHub will launch the first week of November at www.princeton.edu/tigerhub and will replace the homepage of SCORE (the Student Course Online Registration Engine).

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Researchers resolve the Karakoram glacier anomaly, a cold case of climate science

Researchers from Princeton University and other institutions may have hit upon an answer to a climate-change puzzle that has eluded scientists for years, namely why glaciers in the Karakoram range of the Himalayas have remained stable and even increased in mass while glaciers nearby and worldwide have been receding. Understanding the "Karakoram anomaly" could help gauge the future availability of water for hundreds of millions of people.

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Immune proteins moonlight to regulate brain-cell connections

When it comes to the brain, "more is better" seems like an obvious assumption. But in the case of synapses, which are the connections between brain cells, too many or too few can both disrupt brain function. Researchers from Princeton University and the University of California-San Diego recently found an immune-system protein that moonlights in the nervous system to help regulate the number of synapses, and could play an unexpected role in conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes and autism.

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Alumni conference panels explore the black experience at Princeton

The "Coming Back: Reconnecting Princeton's Black Alumni" conference held Oct. 16-18 at Princeton University featured a variety of panel discussions with Princeton faculty, alumni, graduate students and undergraduates on topics including the changing social climate on campus, the role of the Center for African American Studies and affirmative action.

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Toni Morrison papers to reside at Princeton

The papers of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison are now part of the permanent library collections of Princeton University, where the renowned author served on the faculty for 17 years.

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Princeton endowment earns 19.6 percent return

For the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2014, Princeton University's endowment earned a 19.6 percent investment gain. The endowment value stood at $21.0 billion, an increase of about $2.8 billion from the previous year. The 10-year average return on the endowment, which grew to 10.5 percent, places the University's endowment among the top percentile of 520 institutions reporting to the Trust Universe Comparison Service.

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Q&A: How to tackle Ebola's tough ethical questions

Princeton public-health researcher Jason Schwartz explores some of the tough ethical questions that have emerged from the Ebola outbreak that has killed thousands in West Africa and spread concern around the world.

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Senior thesis research: Coming back from the field

Princeton undergraduates span the globe to conduct research for their senior theses, often delving deeply into their projects the summer before the start of senior year. The Office of Undergraduate Research invited members of the Class of 2015 to share their research experiences of the past summer, from locations such as the Shanghai theater district and the Cascade Range mountains of Washington state.

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Middlekauff named executive in residence to support tech-transfer experience

Princeton University's Office of Technology Licensing has named W. Bradford Middlekauff as its first executive in residence, a position aimed at offering an entrepreneurial and industry-based perspective to the faculty and students involved in the transfer of University discoveries to the marketplace.

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Board approves 20 appointments to Princeton faculty

The Princeton University Board of Trustees has approved the appointments of 20 faculty members, including one full professor and 19 assistant professors.

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Princeton faculty approves changes to grading policy

The Princeton faculty on Monday, Oct. 6, approved changes to the University's undergraduate grading policy that include removing numerical targets and replacing them with grading standards developed and articulated by each department.

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Historic New Jersey maps show state's evolution

With beautiful illustrations and incredible detail, a Princeton University exhibition of maps, engravings and photographs shows New Jersey's evolution from the 17th century to the present. Located in the Main Gallery of Firestone Library, the exhibition is titled "Nova Caesarea: A Cartographic Record of the Garden State, 1666-1888" and runs through Jan. 25.

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Capping decades of searching, Princeton scientists observe elusive particle that is its own antiparticle

Princeton University scientists have observed an exotic particle that behaves simultaneously like matter and antimatter, a feat of math and engineering that could eventually enable powerful computers based on quantum mechanics.

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Meetup offers a new way to 'HireTigers'

On a recent sunny Friday, hundreds of Princeton University students mingled with employers representing a variety of fields under a large tent behind the Office of Career Services. The inaugural HireTigers Meetup was an alternative to traditional career fairs as Career Services reimagines its programs to foster new and more meaningful connections between students and employers.

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Recessions result in lower birth rates in the long run

New research from Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs shows that women who were in their early 20s during the Great Recession will likely have fewer children in both the short and long term. Past recessions have resulted in an increase in the number of women who remain childless at age 40.

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Zaera-Polo steps down as dean of Princeton's School of Architecture

Alejandro Zaera-Polo has stepped down from the deanship of Princeton University's School of Architecture to devote greater attention to his research and other professional activities.

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Women don't always find power in numbers

Increasing the number of women in decision-making groups isn't necessarily enough to give them greater power, according to researchers at Princeton University and Brigham Young University.

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'Supersonic' William Surber, enthusiastic leader in electrical engineering, dies at 94

William Surber Jr., a professor of electrical engineering emeritus at Princeton University known for his enthusiasm for teaching and his research on feedback control systems, died on Aug. 27 at the Meadow Lakes retirement community in East Windsor, New Jersey. He was 94.

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Community and Staff Day unites students and families for football and fun

Princeton University welcomed thousands of visitors to campus Sept. 27 for the annual Community and Staff Day, organized by the Office of Community and Regional Affairs. This year's activities included a youth sports clinic; a Princeton football game, to which area residents received free tickets; a Family Fun Fest with children's entertainment and crafts and an information fair; and post-game fireworks.

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Civil liberties examined in context of war

As laws involving American civil liberties have evolved, individuals have needed to be especially vigilant about those rights in wartime, speakers concluded at the "Civil Liberties in Times of War" policy forum held Sept. 18 and 19 in Robertson Hall on the Princeton University campus.

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Genetic 'instruction set' for antibodies knocks down hepatitis C in mice

A study led by Princeton University researchers found that a triple-punch of antibodies both prevented hepatitis C infection and wiped out the disease after it had established itself in laboratory mice. Instead of delivering the antibodies directly, the researchers administered a genetic "instruction set" that, once in a cell, developed into antibodies that target the portions of the virus that do not mutate.

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Code the ode: Center for Digital Humanities marries technology and humanistic studies

The new Center for Digital Humanities — "a nexus of engagement with transformative technologies" that will foster and support interdisciplinary projects across the humanities, computer sciences and library sciences — will open with a reception at 4:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, at the center's new home in Green Hall. "Digital humanities brings computational tools such as large-scale databases and text-analysis software to bear on traditional humanities scholarship," said Meredith Martin, associate professor of English and director of the center.

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Arabic tweets point to U.S. influence as fuel for anti-Americanism

An analysis of millions of Arabic-language tweets confirms high levels of anti-Americanism there, provides new and interesting information about attitudes in the Middle East toward particular U.S. actions, and charts a path for using Twitter to measure public sentiment in ways opinion polls cannot.

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Nanotechnology leads to better, cheaper LEDs for phones and lighting

Princeton University researchers have developed a new method to increase the brightness, efficiency and clarity of LEDs, which are widely used on smartphones and portable electronics as well as becoming increasingly common in lighting.

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Romero named Princeton University's general counsel

Ramona Romero, a lawyer who has held senior positions in government and the private sector and who has been general counsel of the U.S. Department of Agriculture since 2011, will become general counsel at Princeton University effective Dec. 1. Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber announced the appointment Wednesday, Sept. 24.

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FACULTY AWARD: Petry receives 2014 Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering

Princeton University faculty member Sabine Petry, an assistant professor of molecular biology, was one of 18 early-career researchers nationwide to receive a 2014 Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

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FACULTY AWARD: Princeton physicists receive $7.2 million for quantum-materials research

Four Princeton University physicists were among 19 scientists nationwide to receive five-year, $1.8 million awards from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation intended to support "ambitious, high-risk research" in quantum materials: M. Zahid Hasan, a professor of physics; Nai Phuan Ong, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics and director of the Princeton Center for Complex Materials; Jason Petta, an associate professor of physics; and Ali Yazdani, a professor of physics.

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FACULTY AWARD: Three Princeton researchers named NIH New Innovators

Three Princeton University researchers have received 2014 Director's New Innovator Awards from the National Institutes of Health: Timothy Buschman, an assistant professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute (PNI); Michael McAlpine, an assistant professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering; and Mala Murthy, an assistant professor of molecular biology and PNI. The awards support innovative work by early-career scientists.

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FACULTY AWARD: Singer receives Moore Foundation award for data-driven discovery

Amit Singer, a Princeton University professor of mathematics and the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, was one of 14 researchers nationwide selected for a five-year, $1.5 million Investigators in Data-Driven Discovery award from the California-based Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

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AWARD: Two postdocs receive 2014 Blavatnik Regional Award honors

Recent Princeton University postdoctoral researchers Jeremy Palmer, of chemical and biological engineering, and Knut Drescher, of molecular biology, received 2014 Blavatnik Regional Awards for Young Scientists, which recognize outstanding postdoctoral scientists in New Jersey, New York and Connecticut.

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FACULTY AWARD: Two Princeton projects among first NIH BRAIN Initiative awards

Two Princeton University projects are among the first group of studies selected by the National Institutes of Health to receive an overall $46 million in funds related to the federal BRAIN Initiative, which aims to map the activity of all the brain's neurons.

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