News at Princeton

Wednesday, Oct. 01, 2014

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Breakthrough yields simple way to make microscopic electronics

In a breakthrough that could lead to dramatically smaller memory chips and other electronic components, Princeton scientists have found a way to mass produce devices that are so small they are at the limit of what can be viewed by the most powerful microscopes.

The achievement is an advance over current techniques, which require expensive and time-consuming procedures to create anything so small. The technique offers a relatively simple, low-cost production method that may lead to greater memory capacity and lower costs for computers, digital cameras and other devices. In addition, the scientists achieved unprecedented success in packing the minute structures into dense clusters.

The researchers, led by engineering professors Stephen Chou and Stephen Lyon , used a technique known as nanoimprinting, in which they press a mold into a layer of softened plastic on a silicon wafer, making microscopic patterns on the surface of the plastic. The patterns can then be transferred to the silicon where they could form the basis of miniature electronic circuits that store digital information.

The full story is available in a news release.

Contact: Eric Quinones (609) 258-3601

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