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Monday, July 28, 2014

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Early admission offered to 599 students for class of 2010

Princeton University has offered admission to 599 students from a pool of 2,236 high school seniors who applied through early decision for the class of 2010.

The number of early decision applicants increased 10 percent this year, the second year applicants could take advantage of Web-based forms. The admission office mailed notification letters to students Dec. 13.

"I was especially pleased with the quality of the pool which allowed us to choose the very best students for the class of 2010," Dean of Admission Janet Rapelye said. "These early decision admitted students include violinists, dancers, artists, orators, athletes, poets and thespians. Their teachers had the highest praise for their accomplishments."

The accepted early decision applicants are expected to make up 49 percent of the class of 2010, the same percentage as for the two previous classes.

The University offers prospective students whose first college choice is Princeton the opportunity to apply early decision with the condition that they agree to matriculate if admitted. The applicants cannot apply elsewhere. Deferred candidates will be reconsidered during the regular decision application process.

Candidates applying under regular decision must apply by Jan. 1 and will receive notification of admission by early April.

Twelve percent of the students accepted through early decision are international students, and 24 percent are students of color -- a continued increase from 23 percent last year and 18 percent for the class of 2008. Fifty-eight percent of the prospective students are men and 42 percent are women. They represent 26 countries, and 42 states and the District of Columbia.

Half of the students come from public schools, and 45 of the admitted students are the first in their families to attend college.

"We are looking forward to welcoming all of these students to campus next September," Rapelye said.

The Office of Admission offered prospective students for the class of 2010 several options for applying to the University: 16 percent used the paper version of the Common Application, a standardized form used by colleges and universities across the nation, and 21 percent used the online version of that application; 17 percent used the paper Princeton Application, and 46 percent used the online version of the Princeton form.

Average SAT I scores of the admitted students were 720 critical reading, 730 quantitative and 720 writing.

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