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Friday, Sept. 19, 2014

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Video: Student work: 'Rosaleen'


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Casey Ford Alexander profiles "Rosaleen," an original opera created by seniors Maxwell Mamon and Alexis Rodda, which premiers April 2-3 in Richardson Auditorium. More details.


Video Closed Captions

Alexis Rodda:
(singing) Cry, little child, cry. Cry, little child, cry.

Alexis Rodda:
(singing) Cry with the abundance of hope God has given.

Alexis Rodda:
(singing) Cry with the harsh knowledge of your mortality.

Alexis Rodda:
(singing) Cry, my baby, cry. Cry, my baby, cry.

Alexis Rodda:
(singing) Cry until your mother sings you asleep...

(chorus sings)

Max Mamon:
Hi, I'm Max Mamon, and I'm a senior. I am the composer of "Rosaleen." "Rosaleen" is a nice mix of arias.

Max Mamon:
There's some spoken dialogue. The style is kind of a mix of opera from the 20th century,

Max Mamon:
and art song with some pop influences.

cast:
(singing) Let not this flower fade. Hear my mute appeal. Let not this flower fade. Hear my mute appeal.

cast:
(singing) If love can sustain...

Alexis Rodda:
Rosaleen is a Victorian woman in New England who is highly educated for her day, but ends up

Alexis Rodda:
unfortunately encountering tragedy. And even though she attempts to be a modern woman,

Alexis Rodda:
she actually is a interesting mix of Victorian and modern, because through her inability to

Alexis Rodda:
mother a child ends up going mad. So, even though she tries to challenge some feminine

Alexis Rodda:
stereotypes, she also falls into some of those stereotypes herself.

cast:
(singing) Love! Love! We're yearning for love.

Casey Ford Alexander:
Hi, I'm Casey Ford Alexander, Class of 2010.

Vivian DeWoskin:
Hi, I'm Vivian DeWoskin, Class of 2011.

Casey Ford Alexander:
In "Rosaleen," we have to do a series of dances throughout the piece.

cast:
(singing)

Casey Ford Alexander:
A lot of the inspiration comes from Victorian dance.

Vivian DeWoskin:
Group dances.

Casey Ford Alexander:
And it's pretty cool. Whether there are happy scenes or sad scenes, I think Alexis has done

Casey Ford Alexander:
a really good job of making dances that are appropriate for whatever the mood is.

cast:
(singing) Cry, little child, cry. Cry, little child, cry. Cry until your mother sings you asleep.

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