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Thursday, April 24, 2014

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Welcome to Princeton's residential colleges


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Students, college masters and staff members describe the importance of life in Princeton's residential colleges. Read more.


Video Closed Captions

[music]

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
Welcome to the Princeton residential colleges.

[music]

Jeff Nunokawa:
This is your first home here at Princeton

Jeff Nunokawa:
and we do a great deal, we all of
us do, each of us in our own

Jeff Nunokawa:
way, to make it feel like home.

Jeff Nunokawa:
To make you feel like there's
a place for you here, no

Jeff Nunokawa:
matter where you're from,
and no matter

Jeff Nunokawa:
where you want to go.

Sanjeev Kulkarni:
Each of the colleges is having

Sanjeev Kulkarni:
a Master Chef night.

Sarah Paige:
Well, Butler always has wonderful events

Sarah Paige:
going on, but the master's dinner

Sarah Paige:
is definitely wonderful.

Jeff Nunokawa:
It kind of touches on what we think of as

Jeff Nunokawa:
the mission of the college, and
that's to make people feel

Jeff Nunokawa:
lively and at home.

Eduardo Cadava:
What the way the college is envisioned as is a

Eduardo Cadava:
place to bring together undergraduates, graduate

Eduardo Cadava:
students, and faculty in a place
where students live, in

Eduardo Cadava:
order to enhance the life that you have here.

Sanjeev Kulkarni:
Each of the colleges has

Sanjeev Kulkarni:
roughly about 500 students.

Eduardo Cadava:
Part of my charge is just to make sure

Eduardo Cadava:
that where the students live
continues to be a place where they learn.

Sarah Paige:
Well, I think that the residential colleges are a

Sarah Paige:
really special part of the Princeton experience that

Sarah Paige:
allow you to really get to know an extremely diverse

Sarah Paige:
community, but in a much more manageable way.

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
I think what I love most about the

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
residential college system is the sense of community that

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
you have. It's when you walk
into the dining hall and you

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
can sit down with anyone you know.

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
It's when you're walking along
the paths of your college, and

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
you find yourself saying,
"Hi," to so many people.

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
It's when you're studying in the
study rooms, and everyone

Adoley Ammah-Tagoe:
has the same sense of community
in the same environment.

Katelyn Scanlan:
For me, coming from a small town, it

Katelyn Scanlan:
seemed like such a big place.

Katelyn Scanlan:
But once I got here and got into
the residential college

Katelyn Scanlan:
system, into the residential
campus life, it really becomes

Katelyn Scanlan:
a small community and I was
really surprised by how

Katelyn Scanlan:
tight-knit our groups can be.

Katelyn Scanlan:
And I've made of my best friends in

Katelyn Scanlan:
the residential colleges.

Katelyn Scanlan:
So it's something really
unexpected and really, really

Katelyn Scanlan:
nice to have here at Princeton.

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Simon Krauss:
We have six residential colleges.

Simon Krauss:
You're assigned, and you stay
there for at least your

Simon Krauss:
freshman and sophomore year.

Katelyn Scanlan:
How you're sorted into residential

Katelyn Scanlan:
colleges, it's not like you can
put a sorting hat on your

Katelyn Scanlan:
head, like in Harry Potter.

Katelyn Scanlan:
It's done completely randomly.

Jessica Johnson:
Well I like that, in a sense, that it's

Jessica Johnson:
not just one demographic.

Jessica Johnson:
Because part of the reason why
you want to come to college is

Jessica Johnson:
so that you meet people that
aren't in your typical group

Jessica Johnson:
of friends.

Katelyn Scanlan:
Three residential colleges have just

Katelyn Scanlan:
freshmen and sophomores.

Katelyn Scanlan:
And then other residential colleges

Katelyn Scanlan:
are four-year colleges.

Katelyn Scanlan:
For instance, Mathey is the sister college of Rocky.

Katelyn Scanlan:
Rocky has freshmen and sophomores and

Katelyn Scanlan:
Mathey has all classes.

[music]

Victoria Hoss:
A lot ofupperclassmen are also

Victoria Hoss:
choosing to stay in Butler
because it's so nice.

Victoria Hoss:
So that I think, as a different
dynamic-- because

Victoria Hoss:
you don't just have sophomores
and freshmen-- you get to

Victoria Hoss:
interact with upperclassmen who
can help you out with Org-O (organic chemistry)

Victoria Hoss:
and stuff like that, which
is really helpful.

Jennifer Yeh:
Living in Butler
is wonderful, which is

Jennifer Yeh:
actually the reason that I'm
still in Butler as an upperclassman.

Jennifer Yeh:
And so you have a social and
academic network that's there

Jennifer Yeh:
backing you up the entire time.

[music]

Katelyn Scanlan:
Each residential college has some

Katelyn Scanlan:
kind of character.

Katelyn Scanlan:
And it's usually a reflection
of the Master of the College

Katelyn Scanlan:
and the kind of character of
the students that happen to

Katelyn Scanlan:
make up a certain class.

Yien Hao ("Mark") Lock:
What I really like about Whitman is the dining hall.

Yien Hao ("Mark") Lock:
I've been here for four years
and every time I come here,

Yien Hao ("Mark") Lock:
there's always people I know.

Malavika Balachandran:
You can walk into a study room, and

Malavika Balachandran:
it's always filled with people
and you know that you're never

Malavika Balachandran:
really alone.

Lauren Schwartz:
Forbes used to be a hotel, and it's really

Lauren Schwartz:
neat because some rooms even
have their own bathroom.

Lauren Schwartz:
So it's kind of like being
Eloise at the Plaza, only it's

Lauren Schwartz:
not so much pink.

Charquia Wright: It has beautiful views.

Maxim Botstein:
It's really interesting, architecturally,

Maxim Botstein:
so it's really fun to
walk down the halls.

Maxim Botstein:
And you can see how it
changes from a new

Maxim Botstein:
wing to the main Inn.

Owen Knights:
Well, I think Wilson College is special

Owen Knights:
because we have some tremendous academic resources.

Daniel Yeboah-Kordieh:
I'm from Ghana, Accra,

Daniel Yeboah-Kordieh:
and I'm an international
student living in Wilson College.

Eduardo Cadava:
Well, it was the first college.

Eduardo Cadava:
In the late '50s, some students got together and
went to the then-president,

Eduardo Cadava:
President Goheen, and made a case for
an alternative to the eating clubs.

Eduardo Cadava:
It was a place where students
could gather

Eduardo Cadava:
together with faculty. They would invite faculty and it
was a kind of template for

Eduardo Cadava:
the residential college systems.

Alesia Dechkoskaia:
It's next to Frist Campus Center where
you can get late meal and do homework.

Alesia Dechkoskaia:
It's close to some of the libraries.

Daniel Yeboah-Kordieh:
Trust me. If you're in Wilson, you're in the best place.

Akshata Shirahatti:
Rocky's just, in my opinion, the most
beautiful part of campus.

Akshata Shirahatti:
The Gothic architecture really makes for a
great place to live.

Sean Drohan:
The best thing about living in Rocky is that
you live in a castle.

Akshata Shirahatti:
Jeff Nunokawa, our
college Master is great.

Akshata Shirahatti:
I've had a lot of meals with
him and he's a great person to talk to.

Chad Horner, Jonathan Lack and Abraham Chaibi:
Go Rocky!

Sascha Brown:
My favorite part about being in Mathey is the

Sascha Brown:
activities that they put on for us.

Sascha Brown:
My personal favorites were the
two Broadway trips, one to

Sascha Brown:
Wicked, and one to The Lion King.

Peter Giovione:
There's a girl from Kenya.

Peter Giovione:
We're from all over the world.

Peter Giovione:
It's really a great experience
to meet them all.

Student:
I got placed in Mathey.

Student:
I feel like Mathey's full of artsy people.

Sanjeev Kulkarni:
I like to think of Butler as a

Sanjeev Kulkarni:
particularly friendly, collegial,

Sanjeev Kulkarni:
and welcoming place.

Mireille ("Mimi") Pichette:
I like the study break.

Kyle Schenthal:
The location's good for science majors.

Daisy Zhou:
Yeah.

Victoria Hoss:
We're all usually

Victoria Hoss:
outside playing or studying.

Victoria Hoss:
We're a pretty active group.

Kellie Lynch:
I would say so, yeah.

[music]

Charquia Wright:
What's happening tonight is

Charquia Wright:
vegetarian night at Forbes and
it's really popular on campus.

Julie Badessa:
We have a pretty loyal following.

Julie Badessa:
We usually feed about 500 people
for these dinners.

Alex Trimble:
Our entire staff becomes involved with it.

Lauren Schwartz:
The whole campus gravitates towards

Lauren Schwartz:
these special meals.

Alex Trimble:
We have, here at Forbes, absolutely the best culinary team.

[music]

Jessica Johnson:
Most people who graduated will tell you

Jessica Johnson:
that they were greatly impacted
by their time in the

Jessica Johnson:
residential college, whether
they choose to live there as

Jessica Johnson:
upperclassmen or not.

Yien Hao ("Mark") Lock:
And that tends to happen with a lot of people.

Yien Hao ("Mark") Lock:
They stay really attached to
their residential college

Yien Hao ("Mark") Lock:
because of the really close
nature of their friendships,

Yien Hao ("Mark") Lock:
starting in their freshman
and sophomore years.

Peter Giovone: It's really
It's really like a family for me.

Anna Kornfeld Simpson:
It's just a another great way that

Anna Kornfeld Simpson:
Princeton tries to make us all
into a community and form

Anna Kornfeld Simpson:
friendships that are going to
be meaningful to us for the

Anna Kornfeld Simpson:
rest of our lives.

[music]

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