News at Princeton

Monday, Sept. 22, 2014

News Releases

For immediate release: May 2, 2011
Media contact: Emily Aronson, earonson@princeton.edu, (609) 258-5733

Advisory: Princeton faculty experts on Osama bin Laden's death

The Princeton University faculty below may be resources for news media seeking expertise on issues related to terrorism, the Middle East and national security following the death of Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, who was killed by U.S. military forces in Pakistan on May 1, 2011, according to a White House announcement.

Media who would like to reserve the University's satellite uplink television studio or ISDN radio studio for interviews should contact the University's Broadcast Center at bctv@princeton.edu or (609) 258-7872. For more information, visit the Broadcast Center website.

Princeton faculty and their areas of expertise are as follows:

--GARY BASS
Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at the Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

Bass works on human rights, international justice, international security and ethics in international relations. He is the author of Stay the Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals, as well as articles and book chapters on international justice. His 2008 book was called Freedom's Battle: The Origins of Humanitarian Intervention.

--BARBARA BODINE
Diplomat in Residence and Lecturer of Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

Bodine is the former U.S. ambassador to Yemen and can provide expertise on issues of counter-terrorism. Her more than 30 years in the U.S. Foreign Service were spent primarily on Arabian Peninsula and great Persian Gulf issues, specifically U.S. bilateral and regional policy, strategic security issues, counterterrorism, and governance and reform.

--ROBERT FINN
Lecturer of Public and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Research Associate, Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at the Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

Finn served as the first U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan in more than 20 years, from March 2002 until August 2003. Previously, he had served as U.S. Ambassador to Tajikistan, 1998-2001. His other diplomatic postings include Istanbul, Ankara and Izmir, Turkey; Lahore, Pakistan; and Zagreb, Croatia. He opened the U.S. Embassy in Azerbaijan in 1992.

--AARON FRIEDBERG
Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at the Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

Friedberg's areas of interest include international security studies, and U.S. foreign and defense policies, with a focus on East Asia and on the interconnections between the subfields of political economy and security studies.

--ABDELLAH HAMMOUDI
Professor of Anthropology.

Contact: hammoudi@princeton.edu.

Hammoudi was Professor at the Mohammed V University in Rabat, Morocco, and the first holder of the Faisal Visiting Professorship at Princeton. He was the founding director of Princeton's Institute for the Transregional Study of the Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia. Hammoudi has done extensive work on the ethno-history of his native Morocco, fieldwork in Morocco, Libya and Saudi Arabia, in addition to participating in major development projects in these three countries. He teaches courses on Islamic movements, Middle East society, colonialism, French ethnographic theory and political anthropology.

--GREGORY JOHNSEN
Ph.D. candidate in Near Eastern studies.

Contact: gjohnsen@Princeton.edu.

Johnsen is an expert on al-Qaeda in Yemen and is a former Fulbright fellow in Yemen.

--DANIEL KURTZER
Lecturer in Public and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. S. Daniel Abraham Visiting Professor in Middle East Policy Studies.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at the Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

Following a 29-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, Kurtzer retired in 2005 with the rank of career-minister. From 2001-2005 he served as the United States ambassador to Israel and from 1997-2001 as the United States ambassador to Egypt. He served as a political officer at the American embassies in Cairo and Tel Aviv, deputy director of the Office of Egyptian Affairs, speechwriter on the Policy Planning Staff, deputy Assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern Affairs, and principal deputy assistant secretary of state for Intelligence and Research. Throughout his career, Kurtzer was instrumental in formulating and executing U.S. policy toward the Middle East peace process.

--NOLAN MCCARTY
Susan Dod Brown Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

McCarty's areas of expertise include U.S. politics, democratic political institutions, and political game theory. He is the co-author of two books: Political Game Theory (2006, Cambridge University Press with Adam Meirowitz) and Polarized America: The Dance of Ideology and Unequal Riches (2006, MIT Press with Keith Poole and Howard Rosenthal).

--ZIA MIAN
Research Scientist, Woodrow Wilson School and the Program on Science and Global Security. Lecturer in Public and International Affairs.

Contact: zia@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5468.

Mian directs Princeton's Project on Peace and Security in South Asia at the Program on Science and Global Security. Mian can offer expertise on Pakistan and issues of global security. His research and teaching focuses on nuclear weapons and nuclear energy policy, especially in Pakistan and India.

--LAWRENCE ROSEN
William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Anthropology.

Contact: lrosen@princeton.edu or (609) 258-2671.

Rosen is both an anthropologist and a lawyer. His main interests are in the relation between cultural concepts and their implementation in social and legal relationships. His main fieldwork has been in North Africa; he has also worked as an attorney on a number of American Indian legal cases. His publications include Bargaining for Reality: The Construction of Social Relations in a Muslim Community and The Anthropology of Justice: Law as Culture in Muslim Society.

--JACOB SHAPIRO
Assistant Professor of Politics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

Shapiro's primary research interests include terrorism and political violence, aid, and security policy. He can provide expertise on issues of counter-terrorism. Shapiro's research has been published in International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Security Studies, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy and other policy journals.

--ANNE-MARIE SLAUGHTER
Bert G. Kerstetter '66 University Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

Slaughter served as director of policy planning for the U.S. Department of State. She was Dean of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University from 2002-2009. Her areas of expertise include American foreign policy, national and international security, international law and institutions, and international relations theory.

--DIANE SNYDER
Lecturer in Politics.

Contact: dsnyder@princeton.edu or (609) 258-8326.

Snyder, a former CIA officer, has been teaching at Princeton since 1995. She teaches courses on national security, intelligence, terrorism and civil liberties.

--KEREN YARHI-MILO
Assistant Professor of Politics and Public and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Contact: For interview requests, please contact Elisabeth Donahue at the Woodrow Wilson School Office of External Affairs: edonahue@princeton.edu or (609) 258-5988.

Yarhi-Milo's research interest is in the area of international relations, with a focus on international security, foreign policy decision-making, intelligence and signaling. Her recent work examines assessments of an adversary's capabilities, intentions and behavior, with particular focus on current appraisals of the objectives of Iraq, Iran, North Korea and China; U.S. assessments of Soviet intentions during the Cold War; British evaluation of Nazi Germany's goals; and Israel's estimates of the objectives of Egypt under Sadat.

--JULIAN ZELIZER
Professor of History and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

Contact: jzelizer@princeton.edu or (609)258-8846. Media may also try reaching him on his cell phone, (609) 751-4147.

Julian Zelizer is the author and editor of numerous books that examine U.S. political leaders and policies, including the book "Arsenal of Democracy: The Politics of National Security - From World War II to the War on Terrorism" (Basic Books, 2010). Zelizer can provide expertise on issues of national security, and how foreign policy and foreign developments may affect domestic politics.


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