News at Princeton

Wednesday, Oct. 01, 2014

Multimedia: Featured

Princeton's involvement in global health


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Faculty members and undergraduate students speak about Princeton's interdisciplinary approach to global health and health policy. Read more.


Video Closed Captions

[Music]

Adel Mahmoud:
It's one thing to say, I
have a vial of vaccine.

Adel Mahmoud:
And it's another to say,
how can you implement a

Adel Mahmoud:
vaccination program?

[Music]

Adel Mahmoud:
Princeton University's approach
to global health is

Adel Mahmoud:
based on a very, very clear vision.

Christina Paxson:
It really does bridge science
into social science into

Christina Paxson:
public policy in a way
that very few other

Christina Paxson:
institutions can do.

Christina Paxson:
And if you really want to get a
handle on these issues, you

Christina Paxson:
need to have all of that together.

Christina Paxson:
The subject matter demands it.

Christina Paxson:
This multidisciplinary focus is not

Christina Paxson:
just nice, but essential.

Joao Biehl:
One of the hallmarks of our program is

Joao Biehl:
experiential learning.

Joao Biehl:
Learning from local communities,
learning from

Joao Biehl:
interventions on the ground.

[Music]

Joshua Oppenheimer:
When I came to Princeton
I knew that I was

Joshua Oppenheimer:
interested in medicine.

Joshua Oppenheimer:
And I also knew that I was
interested in politics.

Joshua Oppenheimer:
But I never really put
them together.

Joshua Oppenheimer:
I've been able to learn about
how Medicaid programs can

Joshua Oppenheimer:
better set up their design;
how Congress is trying to

Joshua Oppenheimer:
address health care at
the national level.

Joshua Oppenheimer:
And I've also been able to
learn how the Mexican

Joshua Oppenheimer:
government is trying to address their

Joshua Oppenheimer:
health policy issues.

Yolisa Nalule:
I took Professor Biehl's class,
Medical Anthropology.

Yolisa Nalule:
That class and the way he taught
us to view the world of

Yolisa Nalule:
health was the eye opener.

Yolisa Nalule:
It was that ah-ha moment that
you get when you're like, "This

Yolisa Nalule:
is what I want to do."

Yolisa Nalule:
I came up with my summer
internship which I designed to

Yolisa Nalule:
go to Uganda and look at how
doctors, nurses, NGOs --

Yolisa Nalule:
all these organizations that
had HIV/AIDS drugs and were

Yolisa Nalule:
giving them out to people -- how
they're dealing with the

Yolisa Nalule:
issue of drug resistance.

[Music]

Christina Paxson:
Leaders in global health need
to have a broad perspective.

Christina Paxson:
We live in a world where
societies are aging.

Christina Paxson:
Health issues are really
coming to the fore.

Christina Paxson:
We can launch students into
careers where they can make a

Christina Paxson:
difference doing something that's

Christina Paxson:
really, really important.

Yolisa Nalule:
The one thing Princeton has taught me is giving

Yolisa Nalule:
back and service.

Yolisa Nalule:
And the way I can do it is
in the field of health.

Yolisa Nalule:
I will not rest until health
is a human right.

[Music]

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