News at Princeton

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
 

Multimedia: Student

Video: Student Work: 'Science Plays'


To view the multimedia features on this page, you will need to download the latest version of Flash Player and/or enable JavaScript.


Jeffrey Kuperman '12 goes behind the scenes of a staged reading of winning entries from the Princeton science playwriting competition. It will take place 8 p.m., Oct. 17 in Taplin Auditorium.


Video Closed Captions

[music]

Chris Herzog:
I'm Chris Herzog. I'm an assistant professor
in the physics department. Last year, I ran

Chris Herzog:
the first Princeton science playwriting competition.
This year, I'd like to invite you to listen

Chris Herzog:
to the winning entries. We’re going to have
a staged reading on Monday, Oct. 17 at 8 p.m.,

Chris Herzog:
in Taplin Auditorium.

Erisa Apantaku:
I got the idea for "A Quantum Comedy" last
year in Integrated Science, when we were talking

Erisa Apantaku:
about concepts such as Heisenberg’s uncertainty
principle. I wrote about two guys in a dorm

Erisa Apantaku:
room and I thought that was something that
every college student could relate to.

Minqi Jiang:
So I wrote my play about the "Many Worlds"
interpretation of quantum mechanics, which

Minqi Jiang:
states that whenever an action entails multiple
possible outcomes, the universe splits into

Minqi Jiang:
different versions of itself, one to accommodate
each possible outcome.

Lily Yu:
Wu Chien-Shiung was a Chinese-American physicist
famous for violating the law of parity in

Lily Yu:
1953 in an elegant experiment at the national
bureau of standards in D.C. She came to Princeton

Lily Yu:
in 1943 as the first female instructor in
the physics department, although she left

Lily Yu:
for Columbia and the Manhattan Project the
next year. What I wrote is a compressed, surrealist

Lily Yu:
interpretation of her life up until the 1953 experiment.

Chris Herzog:
People are often turned off, I think, from
physics and math because they think it’s

Chris Herzog:
too hard. One thing that’s kept me going
is the idea that if it were really that hard,

Chris Herzog:
then no one would understand it. The fault was
somehow in a poor explanation. Science plays,

Chris Herzog:
I think, are a way of getting around this
problem. By definition, they excite and engage

Chris Herzog:
the audience, and ultimately, if they reach
some higher artistic level, they convey some

Chris Herzog:
deeper truth.

[music]

Back To Top